The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Kingston News (Kingston, ON), June 1, 1846


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p.2 Bay of Quinte - A change has taken place in the arrival and departure of the steamers employed on the Bay, which we have no doubt will prove highly satisfactory to the people of Victoria and Hastings. The trips are now performed in the daytime, the steamers Prince of Wales and City of Kingston leaving Kingston and Belleville at 9 a.m. instead of 6 p.m. as heretofore.

p.3

News Marine List.

Port of Kingston - Arrived.

May 28th - Schr. Europe, Toronto, 539 bbls. Flour, 5926 bush. Wheat; Schr. Elizabeth, Oakville, 699 bbls. Flour, 2520 bush. Wheat; Schr. Prince of Wales, 110 bbls. Pork, 514 bbls. Flour, 60 Hams; Schr. Jessie Woods, Port Credit, 100 bbls. Flour, 3177 bush. Wheat; Schr. Hectorine, Port Credit, 2147 bush. Wheat.

May 29th - Str. Sovereign, Lewiston & Toronto, 5 bxs. Glass, 690 bbls. Flour, 3 bbls. Ashes, 10 bxs. Soap; Stmr. Prince of Wales, Bay Quinte, 32 bbls. Ashes, 8 bbls. Scrap Iron, 350 bbls. Flour, 10 head Cattle, 38 Hogs; Schr. Ida, Port Windsor, 38 bbls. Ashes, 6500 pipe staves; Schr. Elizabeth, 909 bbls. Flour, 36 bbls. Pork.

Coasting Trade on the Lakes - We find the following correspondence between some gentlemen at Dunnville and the Commissioner of Customs, on the subject of the coasting trade, in the columns of the British Colonist:

Dunnville, 29th April, 1846.

Sir, - The merchants and other inhabitants of Dunnville experience inconvenience from the want of a British steam-vessel to take up the route formerly occupied by the unfortunate Kent - nor will they be able to obtain one from either Lake during the present season.

An American steamer would instantly be placed upon a route from Buffalo to Port Colborne, thence to Dunnville and Port Dover returning direct, without touching at any American port, if it could be done by such a vessel without infringing the Imperial Statutes, the Colonial Laws, or the regulations of the Customs.

The opinions of the local Custom House officers differ on the points involved in such an arrangement; nor have they authorities to define what they call coasting by foreign vessels, or to point out their power of interfering in such cases, provided the reports be regular, and the duties paid.

We will be obliged by learning from your department how far the laws and regulations of the Canadian Custom House prevent or interfere with such an arrangement; and if an American vessel, leaving Buffalo with goods and passengers for three Canadian ports, can land them at each respectively, and on the return trip take goods and passengers from either or all of them to Buffalo, without infringing the laws or regulations of the Customs in Canada? Can an American vessel carry goods and passengers, or passengers only, from one Canadian port to another?

The British navigation laws not being in force on the Lakes of Canada, the only British statute that we can find bearing on the subject is 6th Geo. 4th, chap. 110. "An Act to regulate the trade of the British possessions abroad," and we are uncertain of the construction your department put upon sects. 28 and 29 of that act.

We have the honor to be, Sir,

Your obedient servants,

John Jarron, Chisholm & Mivor,

Jas. McIndoe, R. Brown,

Jas. Stewart, L.J. Weatherby,

John Armour, John Martin.

To J.W. Dunscombe, Esq.,

Commissioner of Customs, Montreal.

No. 1.

Customs, Montreal, May 7th, 1846.

Sir, - I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a letter signed by yourself and certain merchants of Dunnville, under date of the 29th ultimo, setting forth the inconvenience which is felt by the inhabitants of that town "from the want of a British steam vessel to take up the route formerly occupied by the Kent."

Also stating, that an American steamer would be placed upon a route from Buffalo to Port Colborne, thence to Dunnville and Port Dover, without touching on its return at any American port, if it could be done without infringing the imperial statutes, the colonial laws, or the regulations of the customs. And inquiring if an American vessel, leaving Buffalo with goods and passengers for three Canadian ports, can land them at each respectively, and on the return trip take goods and passengers from either or all of them to Buffalo, without infringing the laws or regulations of the Customs in Canada?

In reply, I have the honor to acquaint you, that an American vessel, with cargo, brought by regular importation from Buffalo into this Province, and consigned to Port Colborne, Dunnville and Port Dover, is allowed to proceed from port to port, with a manifest, or other usual documentary evidence of its being in the pursuit of a legitimate voyage, provided it carries nothing by way of merchandize from one port to the other except what it originally brought from Buffalo, without having ever discharged the same.

I have the honor to be, Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

J.W. Dunscombe,

Commissioner Customs.

American vessels cannot carry goods and passengers from one British port to another, but passengers only.

John Jarron, Esq. and others, Dunnville.

Lake Superior Fisheries - A company has been formed at Rochester for the purpose of fishing in Lake Superior.


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Original:
June 1, 1846
Local identifier:
KN.4016
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
Rick Neilson
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
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Kingston News (Kingston, ON), June 1, 1846