The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Sandusky Clarion, 22 Oct 1825, p. 3

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A heavy blow commenced on the evening of the 15th, which continued with great violence until the 18th. the wind was principally from the north and north west. We learn that it was very severe upon the shipping down the lake; but the particulars, and the extent of injury done, we have not ascertained. It is said that the Steam-boat Pioneer, and the schooner Phebe, were driven ashore at Grand river on Sunday. It is also said that there are four schooners ashore at Cuyahoga--the northern termination of one of the Ohio canals! Their names are understood to be the Gen. Huntington, the William, the Prudence and the Neptune. We have not heard that any lives were lost.

When the storm was at its utmost pitch of severity, the sch. Mariner, of 96 tons, Capt. Blake, came safely into port. The schooners Commerce, Morning Star, and Fox, also arrived in safety, during the storm.


Welland Canal. The Niagara Gleaner says, that on the summit level of this canal more than a hundred buildings have been erected during the last year. From the level of the Chippewa, on the head waters of the 12 mile creek for about a mile the canal is nearly completed, the greatest depth of which is 17 feet of solid clay.

Buff. Pat.

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Date of Publication:
22 Oct 1825
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Geographic Coverage:
  • Ohio, United States
    Latitude: 41.51949 Longitude: -81.68874
  • Ohio, United States
    Latitude: 41.76032 Longitude: -81.28066
  • Ohio, United States
    Latitude: 41.44894 Longitude: -82.70796
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.042777 Longitude: -79.2125
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Maritime History of the Great Lakes
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Sandusky Clarion, 22 Oct 1825, p. 3