The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Daily British Whig (Kingston, ON), April 19, 1849


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p.2 The Upper Lake - The Steamers Emerald and Oregon will take their stations immediately upon the opening of the navigation, which we suppose will be in a few days, as the ice is fast taking leave of the Chaudiere Lake. Both vessels are in complete repair and will be commanded by the same gentlemen who were last year on board - viz.: Capt. Cumming on the Emerald, and Capt. Hilliard on the Oregon. Capt. Cumming, we believe, is also agent for the Union Line. [Bytown Packet]

What a Change - The number of steamboats on the Upper Lakes, up to the year 1825, was one! On the opening of navigation in the spring of 1849, there were on the entire length of the lakes, 95 steamers, 45 propellers, 5 barks, 93 brigs, 548 schooners, and 128 sloops with an aggregate tonnage of 153,426 62 (sic) one fifth of the whole tonnage of the United States. Some of the steamboats are of nearly 1600 tons burthen, and of the most splendid and costly construction. Who will attempt to say how numerous the craft on these mighty inland seas, will be in as many years more?

Opening of the Erie Canal - [Oswego Times]


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Original:
April 19, 1849
Local identifier:
KN.5651
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
Rick Neilson
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
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Daily British Whig (Kingston, ON), April 19, 1849