The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
British Whig (Kingston, ON), Aug. 22, 1884


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COLLIDING STEAMERS.

Rival Boats Run Into Each Other While Entering Montreal Harbor.

On Wednesday evening the steamers Corsican and Prince Arthur had a race into Montreal harbor. At St. Helen's Island the Prince Arthur essayed to pass the Corsican, and the latter struck her just at the paddle-box, starting some planks and raising an alarm among the passengers of both boats. The boats commenced the race down the rapids and kept pretty close to one another until they reached the point, where they had to turn in order to reach port and enter the canal. The captain of the Corsican states that while they were slowing up the Prince Arthur ran across their bows and was struck by the Corsican on the paddle-box, which was badly damaged. The Corsican was very slightly damaged in front of the paddle-box. Some persons inside felt the boat lurch to one side. The Prince Arthur seems to have attempted to get in front of the Corsican in order to be first in the canal basin.

Dr. Samuel W. Smith, of New York, a passenger on board, said that going down the river that vessel was first with the Corsican a short distance behind. Coming to the Victoria Bridge they were almost abreast, and as they passed through the Corsican was one pier higher on the St. Lambert side. The Prince Arthur was making the greatest speed, when the Corsican, in making the curve, was either sucked around by the current or from some other cause, was seen to be bearing right down on the Prince Arthur. The latter at once slowed, but it was of no avail, and amid excitement the bow of the Corsican ran into the Prince Arthur at the wheel-house, smashing the frame-work and carrying some of the timbers away. Fortunately no one was hurt. The Prince Arthur then made for the lock, where she landed her passengers.

MARINE INTELLIGENCE.

The schr. Norway has a very fascinating cook.

Sailors wages have been advanced to $1.50 per day.

Schr. White Oak has arrived at Swift's with 364 tons coal.

The yacht Una is being overhauled at Powers' shipyard.

Schr. Gazelle cleared for Deseronto with 9,000 feet of maple lumber.

The prop. Niagara from Manistee with 425,000 feet of pine deals is in port.

The str. John ? and barges are loading lumber at Ottawa for this port.

The schr. Gearing, Oswego, has arrived with 160 tons coal for R. Crawford.

The str. Algerian has been thoroughly repaired and is once more on the route.

Arrivals at Gunn's wharf - strs. Armenia, Chicago; Sumner, Oswego; Ontario, Alexandria Bay; Hero, Belleville.

The str. D.D. Calvin and schooners Norway, Bavaria, Prussia, Augusta and Denmark reached Garden Island yesterday with pine from Point au Sable.

An exchange says Captain Estes, of the str. St. Lawrence, is one of the most popular men on the river, and knows just how to run that handsome craft to perfection.

Arrivals at the K. & M.T. Co. - schrs. Samana, Chicago, 20,000 bushels of wheat; Sloan, Chicago, 20,000 bushels of wheat. Departures - str. Chieftain, Montreal, three barges, wheat and stone.

Yesterday morning business boomed. Vessels came in one after the other until nine vessels were in port. The M.T. Co.'s employees have not been busier all summer than now. They worked all last night and are still at it. They will probably work tonight. One said "this is the way we should be kept all summer. If it were, we could live comfortably and there would be no need of soup kitchens next winter." Fourteen vessels are on the way to Kingston. The rates from Chicago to Kingston are 3 5/8 cents. Although low American vessel captains are willing to take it, because they can get coal back to Chicago.

Arrivals at the M.T. Co. - schrs. C.A. King, Chicago, 19,092 bushels of corn; O. Mitchell, Chicago, 21,996 bushels of wheat; Vickery, Chicago, 20,182 bushels of wheat; Hoboken, Chicago, 20,414 bushels of wheat; Bolivia, Chicago, 25,000 bushels of corn; prop. Armenia lightened 9,000 bushels of corn; prop. Canada, Chicago, lightened 7,000 bushels of corn; tug Active, four barges, 2,400 tons coal, Charlotte. Departures: props. Canada and Armenia, Montreal; tug Active, schrs. Gaskin and Glenora, Charlotte, to load coal for Montreal; tug Bronson, six barges, 125,000 bushels of grain, Montreal; Glide, six barges, 100,000 bushels of grain and 600 tons of coal; schr. Vickery, Oswego, to load coal for Chicago; schrs. A.C. King and E.G. McVea, Charlotte, to load coal for Chicago.


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Original:
Aug. 22, 1884
Local identifier:
KN.15005
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
Rick Neilson
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
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Daily British Whig, 22 August 1884 Daily British Whig, 22 August 1884
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British Whig (Kingston, ON), Aug. 22, 1884