The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Unloading iron ore from lake vessels -- old and new methods -- Cleveland, O.


Description
Media Type:
Image
Item Type:
Stereographs
Description:
Across the river the 436 foot long Pittsburgh Steamship Company steam barge MANILA is being unloaded by the "new" method. On the near side the 204 foot schooner ZAPOTEC is being unloaded by a small clamshell is being handled by a single man as the railway ore is being filled. A second schooner appears to be coming into view from the right side of the image.
Inscriptions:

"7965 Unloading iron ore from lake vessels -- old and new methods -- Cleveland, O. Copyright Underwood & Underwood U-85928"
"Underwood & Underwood, Publishers, New York, London, Toronto-Canada, Ottawa-Kansas"
"Works and Studios - Arlington, N. J. Westwood, N. J."
"S196"

Reverse "7965. We are looking northwest across the ship canal known as the "old river bed." That lake steamer over yonder and the nearer vessel at our left have come down from the western end of Lake Superior laden with ore from the biggest and richest iron mines on earth for great steel mills at Youngstown, Pittsburg or Wheeling. Now their holds are being emptied into freight cars for the overland portion of the journey. Railroad tracks like these run along the side of that farther pier beyond the S. S. Manila.

A few years ago the unloading system which we see in operation directly before us was considered splendidly effective. That suspended bucket has been lowered into the vessel's hold and there filled, then lifted high enough to have a clear swing, drawn over here along that overhead trolly-beam, then lowered again for dumping.

To-day it is better economy to use the up-to-date unloading apparatus which looms grotesquely in the air above that farther pier. There 5 to 10 tons or ore can be lifted in one load, and the work is done much more quickly than with these suspended "pockets."

To watch the working of one of the new "clam" unloaders, use Stereographs 7963 and 7970. To see what becomes of this iron after it reaches Pittsburg, use Stereographs 5520 (melting in a blast furnace); 5521 (converters where iron is transformed into steel); 5523 (drawing out a 90 foot beam of red-hot steel). For the actual mining of the ore up in Minnesota, use 7954 (open-pit) and 7947 (underground).

From Notes of Travel No. 37, copyright by Underwood & Underwood.

Publisher:
Underwood & Underwood
Place of Publication:
New York, London, Toronto-Canada, Ottawa-Kansas
Date of Original:
c1910
Dimensions:
Width: 17.8 cm
Height: 8.8 cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
82
Language of Item:
English
  • Ohio, United States
    Latitude: 41.509477 Longitude: -81.693649
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Unloading iron ore from lake vessels -- old and new methods -- Cleveland, O.
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Unloading iron ore from lake vessels -- old and new methods -- Cleveland, O.


Across the river the 436 foot long Pittsburgh Steamship Company steam barge MANILA is being unloaded by the "new" method. On the near side the 204 foot schooner ZAPOTEC is being unloaded by a small clamshell is being handled by a single man as the railway ore is being filled. A second schooner appears to be coming into view from the right side of the image.