The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
John By (Steamboat), 23 Nov 1831


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LAUNCH OF THE " JOHN BY " STEAM BOAT. - On Wednesday last, the launch of this fine vessel took place from Mississagua Point, where little more than three months ago the first beam in her construction was laid. Notwithstanding the unfavorable state of the weather, multitudes were attracted to witness a sight connected so closely with the anticipated prosperity of Kingston, and indicative of the completion of that stupendous channel through which her future progress will be directed. Her appearance on the stocks, as she proudly overlooked her natural element, her deck covered with national banners, and ?????ded by an anxious multitude--were only equalled by her grand and majestic appearance as she glided into the water; and as if conscious of her dignity, floated proudly in the view of the admiring spectators. Mr. Drummond, with his usual enterprise, took the contract for her building with the company, and procured the superintendance of Mr. Crochet from New York, upon whose professional character as a ship-builder, this vessel reflects the utmost mechanical skill and genius.
Her length when finished will be 110 feet from stem to stern. Breadth of beam, 28 feet, or 30 feet over the guards; her draught of water when furnished with her engine, 3 feet 6 inches. She will have a gentleman's cabin on deck, 41 feet by 20; ladies cabin below, 22 feet by 24; with a promenade deck the full length of the vessel. Her engine, made by Bennet and Henderson of Montreal is of 75 horse power, and her burthen will be 200 tons.
      We have seldom seen a more elegant specimen of naval architecture; and we most sincerely hope that the expectations of her enterprising proprietors will be amply realized by the prosperity of her future career. Early next spring, she will commence her trips on the line of the Rideau, for which she is exclusively designed, to Grenville. The band of the 65th. were kindly furnished, to add their attractions to this novel and interesting spectacle; and the proprietors and public in general were much indebted to Captain Polly who, with the TORONTO, afforded them all the accommodation in her power, and towed this additional offspring of Kingston enterprise to her winter resting place. - Chronicle.
      Kingston Patriot
      Tuesday, November 29, 1831



"The risk of Lake Ontario, during the months of navigation, I am persuaded is not greater than of Long Island Sound. The best proof is, that since steam-boats have been introduced on the lake, (and there are now between thirty and forty, large and small, on Lake Ontario), there have been but two boats lost, viz: - the MARTHA OGDEN, in the summer of 1832 - a miserable old boat of about 30 horsepower, belonging to the port of Oswego - and the JOHN BY, belonging to Upper Canada, during this summer. The JOHN BY was a botched concern from the beginning, and neither she nor the MARTHA OGDEN would in fact have been looked upon as seaworthy, or as ensurable vessels, at the time they were lost."
      Oswego Free Press
      December 4, 1833


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
launch, Kingston
Date of Original:
1831
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.E.1104
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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John By (Steamboat), 23 Nov 1831