The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Keystone State (Steamboat), 1 May 1849


Description
Full Text

Truly the KEYSTONE STATE, is a model specimen of steamboat workmanship. The joiner work of this splendid boat is by Mr. John M. Smith, already so favorably known by many former achievements in this line of business, and the painting and decoration by Mr. James Smith, whose accurate knowledge of his art and excellent taste, has contributed much to the beauty and elegance of our lake marine, and to which every work that has passed under his hands bears witness. Buffalo has reason to be proud of the noble vessels (and finer, are no where to be found) which hail from her port, but far more of the individuals whose enterprise, genius and good taste have afforded her so many triumphs of admirable workmanship, and of none more in their line than the gentlemen who have made the KEYSTONE STATE (and that too, in the short space of six weeks) in point of fitting up, finish and decoration, a perfect model of elegance, grace and beauty.
The KEYSTONE STATE is owned by Mr. C. M. Reed, was modelled and built by Messrs. Bidwell and Banta, and will take her place in Reed's Line of Chicago boats.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      Tuesday, May 15, 1849 p.2

      . . . . .

      THE KEYSTONE STATE.---This boat has made a trip to Erie to try her machinery, and is to make another to Detroit before taking her place in the Chicago Line. In the notice our correspondent made of her yesterday, it was omitted to mention that the boat was modeled and the cabin designed by Captain E. Powers, who has suggested many improvements in the construction of our lake marine.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      Wednesday, May 16, 1849 p.2

      . . . . .

      THE KEYSTONE STATE.
      Although a correspondent noticed this new steamer, which has just been completed here, generally, yet we believe we have not given a detailed description of her several parts and capacities. She is the second boat upon the lakes in regard to size - strongly and staunchly built, and well adapted to the business which she is designed, freight and passage in Gen. Reeds Chicago Line. The following are her dimensions:
Length of hull, 288 feet.
Breadth of beam. 35
      " including guards, 63
Depth of hold. 14
Length of Dining Saloon, 230
Breadth of 16
Burden, carpenter's measure, 1460 tons.
      She has 70 large and commodious state rooms, 20 of which are family, or double bed rooms.- The ladies' cabin has 36 berths, with an ante and two family rooms, There are two large steerage cabins, one forward and the other aft, with 10 large family rooms of 9 and 12 berths each.
The main cabin which was designed by Capt. E. Powers - is one of the most elegant on the
lakes. Its furniture, from. the warehouse of J. Siasts, of this city, is in keeping with the rooms which it decorates.
The Keystone State is to be propelled by a powerful beam engine of 500 horse power, manufactured in New York, and though not designed for a fast boat, yet she will make as good average time as any other. She has a capacity for storing 6000 bbls. of flour, and her main deck is roomy and convenient. Altogether the KEYSTONE, is a splendid specimen of naval architecture, and well displays the skill of her designers and builders, Messrs. Bidwell & Banta, of this city, who are not surpassed upon the western waters in turning out specimens of workmanship, which for strength and beauty of model, and splendor of finish challenge the admiration of all who witness them.
The KEYSTONE STATE takes her place in Reed's Chicago Line, and intends leaving on Monday
evening. She, is under the charge of Capt. Richards, well known upon the lakea as an officer of long experience, with competent and gentlemanly assistants in the various departments. - - - [Com. Adv. of saturday.]
      Buffalo Daily Courier
      Saturday, May 19, 1849

      . . . . .

      Mr. Editor. --- In your paper of Wednesday last, it is intimated that the KEYSTONE STATE was "modeled and her cabin designed by Captain E. Powers," and your Saturday evening paper repeated the statement that her cabin was designed by that gentleman. This is so far from true in both particulars, and so well know to be so by every one who has worked on the boat, that it is a matter of some surprise how you should have been so much misled. The boat was modeled long before Captain Powers had any connection with her, and whatever of credit is due for the arrangemen and proportions of her cabin is fairly mine. Not only was no design furnished by that gentleman, but had I ever followed the alterations he suggested, her cabin "one of the most elegant on the lakes" would have been a laughing stock of all persons of judgment and taste. Captain Powers was employed by Mr.Reed to superintend the finishing of the boat, and it is quite natural that his friends---some one of whom must have imposed upon you---should seek to gain for him the credit dur for an effort now seen to be commendable, but which he had very little agency in producing. I have no wist to detract in the least degree from the just merits of any one connected in any way with the production of that fine specimen of steamboat workmanship, and a sense of self respect alone compels me to insist upon not being deprived of the credit due to my own efforts.
      I am, with respect, Your ob't servant, JOHN SMITH
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      Monday, May 21, 1849 p.2

      . . . . .

THE KEYSTONE STATE.---This new and beautiful boat of Gen. Reed leaves for Chicago on her first trip, today, and as we have not given a detailed description of her several parts and capacities, we copy the following from the Commercial:
"She is the second boat upon the lakes in regard to size--strong and staunchly built, and well adapted to the business for which she is designed, freight and passage in Gen. Reed's Chicago Line. The following are her dimensions:-
Length of hull . . . . . 288 feet
Beadth of beam . . . . . 35 feet

      Breadth of beam, including guards 63 feet
      Depth of hold . . . . . 14 feet
      Length of dining saloon, . . 230 feet
      Breadth of dining saloon . . 16 feet
      Burden, Carpenter's measure . . 1,460 tons
She has 70 large and commodious state rooms, 20 of which are family or double bed rooms. The Ladies cabin has 36 berths, with an ante and two family rooms. There are two large steerage cabins, one forward and the other aft, with 10 large family rooms of 9 and 12 berths each.
The main cabin, which was designed by Capt. E. Powers, is one of the most elegant on the lakes. Its furniture, from the warehouse of J. Stants, of this city, is in keeping with the rooms which it decorates.
The KEYSTONE STATE is to be propelled by a powerful beam engine of 500 horse power, manufactured in New York, and though not designed for a fast boat, yet she will make as good average time as any other. She has a capacity for storing 6,000 barrels of flour, and her main deck is roomy and convenient. Altogether the KEYSTONE is a splendid specimen of naval architecture, and well displays the skill of her designers and builders. Messrs. Bidwell & Banta, of this city, who are not surpassed on the western waters in turning out specimens of workmanship which, for strength and beauty of model, and splendor of finish, challenge the admiration of all who witness them.
The KEYSTONE takes her place in Reed's Chicago Line, and leaves this evening. She is under the charge of Capt. Richards, well known upon the lakes as an officer of long experience, with competent and gentlemanly assistants in the various departments."
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      May 21, 1849


Steam paddle KEYSTONE STATE. Of 1,354 tons. Built Buffalo N. Y., 1849. First home port, Presque Isle, Pa. DISPOSITION:-- Lost on Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, October 30, 1861, with the loss of 33 lives.
      Merchant Steam Vessels of the U. S.
      Lytle - Holdcamper List, 1790 to 1868
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
new vessel
Date of Original:
1849
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.E.2529
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Keystone State (Steamboat), 1 May 1849