The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
James Madison (Steamboat), 1 May 1837


Description
Full Text

New Steamboats The new steamboats James Madison and Bunker Hill made their first appearance in our harbor yesterday afternoon The Madison is another "monster' among our lake craft. measuring 181 feet in length on deck, with 30 feet breadth of beam, 12 1/2 depth of hold, and carrying 700 tons being the largest boat yet built on the western waters. She is designed expressly for the Chicago trade, running direct from Buffalo to that place, touching at the different ports on Lake Erie up and down, at mackinaw and Milwaukie on her way up, and at Michigan City, St. Josephs and Grand River, on her return. She will consume eighteen days in the whole voyage, including time spent in port, but it is intended to make the trip in five days between the two great points from which she plies.
      This new and splendid boat is an important addition to our western commerce. She combines both the conveniences and elegancies of a packet, with the utility of a freight boat, having spacious cabins, fitted up in first style, with storage room below decks for 2500 bbls, and calculated to carry in all 4,500 bbls. The cabins of the Madison are arranged somewhat differently from the ordinary custom, and it strikes up as an improvement. The ladies cabin, containing 30 berths, is below, communicating by a stair case with a vestibule by which access can easily be had to the dining cabin above, which is intended to be occupied, in common, as a saloon, by both ladies and gentlemen. This cabin, which has 33 berths for gentlemen, is surrounded by state rooms, 15 in number. with 2 berths each An important and very agreeable addition to these convenient arrangements, is a large saloon, with 12 berths on the hurricane deck, exclusively for gentlemen; where refreshments, &c. are furnished, and which makes a capital resort for the lovers of a lounge and a good cigar, after dinner. In connection with the spacious promenade at hand, on the after deck, which is protected from any disagreeable odor of the engine by the covered work amidships -- it must contribute vastly to enhance the pleasures of a voyage through the wild scenery of the upper lakes.
The Madison was built at Erie the past winter, under superintendence of John Richards. Her model, which is quite sharp fore and aft, with round stern, was designed by Capt F. Church. She is owned by Col. C.M. Reed, of Erie, and commanded by Capt. R. C. Bristol, her engine is high pressure, 8 feet stroke, 28 inch cylinder, and about 180 horse power -- made by Woden & Binney, Pittsburgh, and cost $20.000. The entire cost of the boat is estimated at $75.000. She leaves tomorrow evening on her first trip to Chicago, M. Kingman & Co., Principal agents in this city. We shall notice the " Bunker Hill" tomorrow.
      Buffalo Daily Commercial Advertiser
      Friday, May 19, 1837

      . . . . .

      Our wharves yesterday presented a scene of great bustle and animation. Six steamboats from Buffalo entered our harbor, deeply laden with passengers, merchandize, &c. It is estimated, and we think correctly too, that more than three thousand persons were journeying to the west on board the several boats arrived yesterday.
      Just at evening, a new leviathan of the deep, the JAMES MADISON of Presque Isle, with the banner "broad and gay" floated up to the dock, the admiration of hundreds of citizens assembled to welcome the beautiful stranger guest. A more magnificent spectacle has seldom been witnessed on western waters. From a thousand to twelve hundred persons came passengers in this spacious boat, mostly destined for Detroit and Chicago. We are indebted to the Buffalo Commercial Advertiser for the following description.
      " The MADISON is another "monster" among our lake craft, measuring 181 feet in length on deck, with 30 feet breadth of beam, 12 feet 6 inches depth of hold and carrying 700 tons - being the largest boat yet built on the western waters. She is designed expressly for the Chicago trade, running direct from Buffalo to that place, touching at the different ports on Lake Erie up and down, Mackinaw and Milwaukie on her way up, and at Michigan City, St. Josephs and Grand River, on her return. She will consume eighteen days in the whole voyage, including time spent in port, but it is intended to make the trip in five days between the two great points from which she plies.
      This new and splendid boat is an important addition to our western commerce She combines both the conveniences and elegancies of a packet, with the utility of a freight-boat - having spacious cabins, fitted up in first style, with steerage room below decks for 2,500 bbls. and calculated to carry, in all 4,500 bbls. The cabins of the MADISON are arranged somewhat differently from the ordinary custom, and it strikes us as an improvement. The ladies cabin, containing 30 berths, is below, communicating by a stair case with a vestibule by which access can easily be had to the dining cabin above, which is intended to be occupied, in common, as a saloon, by both ladies and gentlemen. This cabin, which has 23 berths for gentlemen, is surrounded by state rooms, 15 in number, with two berths each. An important and very agreeable addition to these convenient arrangements, is a large saloon, with 12 berths, on the hurricane deck, exclusively for gentlemen; where refreshments, &c., are furnished, and which makes a capital resort for the lovers of a lounge and a good cigar, after dinner. In connection with the spacious promenade at hand, on the after deck - which is protected from any disagreeable odor of the engine by the covered work amidships - it must contribute vastly to enhance the pleasures of a voyage through the wild scenery of the upper lakes, to that nurseling city of the west which is, as yet, the Ultima Thule of our commercial enterprise.
      The MADISON was built at Erie the past winter, under superintendence of Mr. John Richards. Her model, which is quite sharp fore and aft, with round stern, was designed by Capt. F. Church. She is owned by Col. C.M. Reed, of Erie, and commanded by Capt. R.C. Bristol. Her engine is high pressure, 8 feet stroke, 28 inch cylinder, and about 180 horse power - made by Woden and Binney, Pittsburgh and cost $20,000. The entire cost of the boat is estimated at $75,000."
      Cleveland Daily Herald & Gazette
      Wednesday, May 24, 1837 p.2 c.1



Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
new boat
Date of Original:
1837
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.E.2658
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










James Madison (Steamboat), 1 May 1837