The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
North America (Steamboat), 10 Jun 1834


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NEW STEAM BOAT. -- On Thursday the 4th inst. the books for the subscription to the stock, in the Steam Boat now building at this place, were opened, and upwards $11,000 subscribed in a few minutes. It is believed that from fifteen to twenty thousand dollars will be subscribed by citizens in this vicinity. We hail this spirited undertaking as a new and encouraging evidence of the growing prosperity of the place. - - - Conneaut Gazette.
      Cleveland Weekly Herald
      July 20, 1833; 3; 1.

      . . . . .

      Steamboat NORTH AMERICA, Capt. Appleby. - This new steamboat arrived in our city on Sunday last, from Conneaut, at which place she was built and is mostly owned. She is another neat and valuable acquisition to the numerous steamboats now plying between this place and the vast west, being 150 ft. in length and 170 tons burthen, and is propelled by a powerful high pressure engine of 140 horse power. She is not as yet entirely finished, but is to remain here to receive her remaining fixtures, and when completed will commence her regular weekly trips between this place and Detroit, touching at intermediate ports. R. Sears & Co. of this city are agents and part owners.
      Buffalo Patriot
      June 10, 1834 2-5

      . . . . .

THE NORTH AMERICA. -- Of the fabrication of Steam-Boats there is no end. They roam our lakes of all sizes and of every degree of speed; and they go and come at all hours both of night and day -- insomuch that to register their days or hours, or to know their times and seasons is hardly possible.
      We have just returned from viewing the NORTH AMERICA, Capt. Appleby, now in port. She is new, having just taken the lake -- was built at Conneaut, Ohio, and is owned by an incorporated Company. The AMERICA is certainly a fine looking boat upon the water; and is well fitted for comfort and convenience. She is one hundred and fifty feet long, upon deck, twenty six feet beam and will draw, when loaded, about six feet of water. Her Ladies' cabin is on deck, has sixteen berths and is surrounded by seven State Rooms, with two berths each. The Gentlemen's cabin is furnished with twenty-two, and the Steerage twenty-[?] berths. She is of 360 tuns burden, and is driven by a high pressure, horizontal engine of 180 horse power, with twenty-eight inch cylinder, and seven foot stroke. The power of her engine and her general appearance are much in favor of her speed. As a whole she is, at least to the eye of a landsman a boat of fine appearance and good promise. Not the least interesting fact touching this boat is that she is to have fitted, in a bar, upon deck, a 'soda fountain.' This will diminish dram drinking, vastly increase the comfort of passengers, and we hope, the profits of owners.
      The AMERICA is now receiving her paint, &c. and will be ready, we learn, to commence her regular trips, in the course of the present week. --- R. Sears & Co. agents and part owners.
      Buffalo Whig
      June 18, 1834 p. 2, c. 6-7

      . . . . .
     
      LAKE ERIE STEAM BOATS.
      We have frequent inquiries, from distant places, concerning the Steam Boats of these waters.
The following is an extract of a letter to us,
received yesterday, and dated. BOSTON, Mass., Dec. 8, 1834
"Of your city, and the region west of it, we know, in fact, but little; and form, for the most part, but very erroneous conclusions, in relation to either. We hear, often, of Lake Erie Steam boats, but know nothing of the number, and hardly more of their general character. If not too much trouble, may I ask that you will favour me with the names of the several Steam Boats upon Erie, and the more western lakes? Any facts relating to the business character of Buffalo, &c. would also be acceptable, should leisure permit. "
In compliance with the request of our correspondent, we have obtained from a gentleman who is an extensive owner the names of all our Steam Boats, and those of the British, which we subjoin.
We given them in this form, rather than in a private letter, that it may meet the eye of others, who are making similar inquiries.
      American Steam Boats on Erie and the Upper. Lakes.
      MICHIGAN, PENNSYLVANIA,
      THOMAS JEFFERSON, OHIO,
      SANDUSKY, GOVERNOR MARCY,
      GENERAL PORTER, DETROIT,
      DANIEL WEBSTER, OLIVER NEWBERRY,
      UNITED STATES, ENTERPRISE,
      CHARLES TOWNSEND, DELAWARE,
      NORTH AMERICA, WILLIAM PEACOCK,
      OLIVER H. PERRY, NIAGARA,
      MONROE, GENERAL BRADY,
      NEW-YORK, GENERAL GRATIOT,
      SUPERIOR, ANDREW JACKSON,
      UNCLE SAM, VICTORY,
      SHELDON THOMPSON, CAROLINE,
      WILLIAM PENN, MAJOR JACK DOWNING
      HENRY CLAY,
      British Do.
      MINESSETUNK, THAMES,
      ADELAIDE.
      Of the character of our Boats for strength, speed and elegance, we may challenge any water to a comparison. Many of them are of the largest class, and all well found.
Of facts relating to the business character of our city, we can at this moment do no more than refer our correspondent to our advertising columns; but will write him in a few days, in detail upon the subject.
      Buffalo Whig
      December 17, 1834
     
      . . . . .


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
new vessel
Date of Original:
1834
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.E.3080
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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North America (Steamboat), 10 Jun 1834