The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Phoenix (Propeller), 26 Apr 1845


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woodcut of PHOENIX from J. W. Halls Great Lake Marine Scrapbook, Sept. 1877.


      The propeller PHOENIX was launched from the shipyard of Capt. G.W. Jones, on the 26th inst. She is a fine model, built to combine speed with great strength in 147 ft. on deck, 138 ft. keel, 22 1/2 ft. beam, over guards 26 ft., 10 ft. hold, measures 305 tons, sits high in the water, and will draw only 5 ft. with everything on board ready for sea. The PHOENIX is intended for the enlarged Welland Canal, and will have ample accommodations for 300 passengers. Her engine 100 horse power, Loper's wheel, manufactured by the Cuyahoga Steam Furnace Co., under the superintendemce of Mr. Hall, the boilers from Mr. H.C. Morris' manufactory, constructed under the supervision of Mr. Johnson.
      The PHOENIX is owned by Messrs. Pease & Allen, E. Burkle and G.W. Jones, and will be ready to commence her trips on the 15th of June. - Cleveland Herald.
      Daily National Pilot
      May 1, 1845

      . . . . .

      The PHOENIX is a most beautiful vessel, of about 320 tons measurement. She belongs to Messrs. Pease & Allen, E.R. Burkle and her captain Geo. W. Jones. She is 145 ft. long, 23 ft. beam, and 10 ft. hold, including her guards, she is 26 ft. beam, this being the largest size vessel that can pass through the enlarged Welland Canal, for which trade the PHOENIX is designed after the present season.
      In one respect the PHOENIX differs from all the propellers I have ever seen. Her engine is place "midship," or nearly so, she having 2 freight holds, one aft and one forward of her machinery. On her main deck she has two cabins, which are also seperated by her engine room. The one aft, or gentlemen's cabin is fitted up with state rooms, and has berths for 30 passengers. The cabin is conveniently, neatly and elegantly furnished and finished. Her forward or steerage cabin is large conveniently arranged expressly for emigrants and that class of passengers, and is not excelled by any steamboat on the lakes. It will, with the standing berths and sacking frames give good accommodation to 200 passengers. Connected with it is a large kitchen, having cooking stove, pumps, &c. &c. Besides these two cabins, she has on her upper or promenade deck, a large saloon, with 8 berths, for cabin passengers; a wash room and a bar; with this she can, in her best cabin, well accommodate 40 passengers. She has one engine; the boiler is 20 ft. long, with 2 furnaces, each 5 by 3 ft.; 24 main flues, 15 ft. long and 9 inches in diameter; with steam chimney and heater, the heater forming a part of the smaoke pipe or chimney, and contains 38 one inch copper tubes, 3 ft. long, through which the exhaust steam passes, thence into the chimney. The entire fire surface of the boiler, from keelson up to and through the upper deck, is surrounded by having water back, water bottom, and (by the placing of the heater) a water jacket, through the deck extreme length of smoke pipe, including the steam chimney and heater, 42 ft.: Length above deck 33 ft.; diameter 38 inches. The cylinder is placed vertically; diameter 20 inches; stroke 43 3/8 inches; piston works from below; the main shafts are 48 ft. long, and in two parts connected by a sliding clutch coupling; inner end of the shaft 7 inches diameter; outer end 6 inches diameter; these main shafts are connected by a cross shaft by means of bevel gears, allowing the whole power of the engine to be worked as well upon one propeller alone as upon both, or if necessary, without moving either propeller; the power is applied direct to the main shafts through two connecting rods working at an angle from the cross head .
      The propellers are of Capt. R.F. Loper's patent, and were made under his direction at Philadelphia; diameter 8 ft., each having 4 buckets or blades, 4 ft. wide at outer edge, and 3 ft. 4 inches wide at the hub or eye, the angle of these buckets from the shaft is 32 degrees at the eye, and 52 degrees at the outer edge, are of wrought iron, and weigh each about one ton.
      Banner presentation - This beautiful banner painted by Mr. Stephenson, was this day presented to the propeller PHOENIX by the Phoenix Fire Co., No. 4. The ceremony took place at 10:00 at the foot of Superior Lane. E.B. Fisher in behalf of the company, made the presentation speech, which was responded to by G.W. Jones, Captain of the propeller. Those who heard the address say they were eloquent and appropriate.
      There was a fine pleasant party on board, accompanied by the Cleveland Brass Band. Their destination is Fairport. The propeller moved off in fine style and with a speed equal to the ordinary steamboats. She is a fine model of a vessel just such as our enterprising townmen Pease & Allen know how to make.
      Luck to the craft and her jolly crew. - Cleveland Herald.
      Daily National Pilot, Buffalo
      Tuesday, July 8, 1845

      . . . . .

      The new propeller PHOENIX, Capt. G.W. Jones, took a turn in the Bay last evening, and her working proved highly satisfactory. Her engine, which is constructed upon a new principle, the invention of Mr. Hall, the engineer, made 75 revolutions in a minute, and her speed was 11 or 12 miles the hour, as near as we could judge. As some new principles have been incorporated into the construction of her machinery, we shall give a description hereafter.
      Daily National Pilot, Buffalo
      Saturday, July 12, 1845

      . . . . .

      The propeller PHOENIX left on Saturday night for Chicago and the west, with a large number of emigrant passengers and quite a quantity of freight.
      Daily National Pilot, Buffalo
      Monday, July 14, 1845

      . . . . .

      PROPELLER " PHOENIX."
Considerable has already been said of this craft, but certainly not more than she deserves. But, as we proposed a few days since we will give a description of her machinery, which, in some respects is somewhat new. We together with a number of our citizens and most experienced seamen and engineers, were favored with a trip in the Bay on Friday last, for the purpose of observing the qualities of the boat and more particularly the operation of her machinery, which is of somewhat different construction from any other. During a portion of the time her engine made as high as 78 revolutions per minute, when it was estimated that her speed was equal to 12 miles an hour. It was concluded by those having much experience in these matters and capable of estimating their power and speed, that she may be set down as a fair 10 mile boat, at all times. All were satisfied with her, both for speed and as a sea boat. Her arrangements for passengers and freight are not surpassed, for the line of business for which she is designed. Her commander Capt. G.W. Jones, under whose superintendence she was built, is deserving much praise. Certainly in building the PHOENIX, he has shown himself well acquainted with the requisites of a boat, designed for the trade which she is employed.
      The engine, built after the plan, and under the particular direction of her engineer, Mr. David Hall, is the most compact, least complicated, most controllable, and best adapted to its objects of any that has yet been got up on any propeller.
      To Mr. H., much credit is due. He certainly may be considered a scientific mechanic, one who studies and operates upon principle. In the getting up of the engine of the PHOENIX, he has demonstrated a principle that almost all have contended against, viz: that quick working engines (such as are required upon propellers) may be of longer stroke, worked at as high speed with greater power by less amount of steam, than short stroke, with large cylinders; as seems generally to have been supposed by those getting up engines for like purposes. A description of her engine and its operation, will satisfy any one acquainted with such things, of its superiority. She has but one engine, the cylinder 20 inches in diameter and 43 3/8 inch stroke; the piston works from below, is connected to a cross shaft with bevel gears, which drives the propellers. The propellers are upon Loper's plan; 8 ft. in diameter, the buckets of which are 4 ft. wide at the outer edge and 3 ft. 4 inch wide at the hub. At the time we witnessed her operation she made with apparent ease, from 75 to 78 revolutions per minute.
      Many matters of convenience and economy have been considered in getting the PHOENIX and her machinery. First although it was an object to have an engine capable of being driven with the greatest power and smallest amount of steam, yet, not as is too frequently the case, will she ever lack steam, or for want of it, in any emergency be obliged to force her boiler so as to strain it, for it is so proportioned to the engine as to afford it an abundant supply, without extra fire, at the same time, were it necessary, the boiler is capable of sustaining a greater pressure than any other on the lakes, being made of heavier material and an extra amount of bracing. The boiler is 20 ft. long, with two furnaces, each 5 by 3 ft., 34 main flues, 12 ft. long and 5 inches in diameter, 12 return flues 15 ft. long and 9 inches in diameter, with a steam chimney and heater, the heater forming part of the chimney and containing 38 one inch copper tubes, 3 ft. long, through which the exhaust steam passes.
      Another very important arrangement is that in case her wheels become loose or any way deranged, the fixture about them are so contrived that they may be taken off and repaired without hauling the vessel out, or even it may be done while at sea, and being so arranged as to work one or both wheels, in the event of taking off a wheel there would be but little detention, or inconvenience.
      The engine and all the fixtures are permanent and well proportioned, and was constructed throughout under the direction of Mr. Hall. The work was executed at the Cuyahoga Works, Cleveland, is a fair specimen of the work they are capable of doing, and highly creditable to the mechanics through whose hands it passed, and we trust will be sufficient to convince our steamboat men that engines of as good description and finish can be built at ports on the lakes, a in any other part of the U.S., and that for work hereafter, they will patronize their friends and neighbors, rather than go abroad, and they will show that "some things can be done as well as others."
      Daily National Pilot, Buffalo
      Wednesday, July 16, 1845

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The prop. PHOENIX returned yesterday from her first trip to Chicago, having made the voyage in a little less than 12 days. She came down in 94 hours, the last 350 miles with only one wheel, the other having broken loose from the shaft. Her machinery works to a charm and shows the advantages which were claimed for it to have been a reality.
      Daily National Pilot, Buffalo
      Saturday, July 26, 1845

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Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
launch, Cleveland, &c.
Date of Original:
1845
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.E.3354
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Phoenix (Propeller), 26 Apr 1845