The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Princeton (Propeller), 1 Mar 1845


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Capt. Hart's new propeller VICTORY was launched yesterday from the shipyard of Messrs. Sanford & Moses, in fine style. She sits admirably in the water, and will rank number one in the popular class of steamboats.
The new prop. PRINCETON, built at Perrysburgh, was launched on Saturday last -- Cleveland Herald.
      National Daily Pilot
      March 17, 1845

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The "Miami of Lake Erie" (the romantic but awkward name of a very good paper published at Perrysburgh, Ohio, announces that Messrs. Hollisters' propeller PRINCETON, is expected to leave that port for Buffalo, on the 25th. inst.
      National Daily Pilot
      March 18, 1845

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The PRINCETON - A prettier model than this vessel presents, we have never seen, and the builder deserves great credit not only for his work, but for having overcome certain prejudices that assailed him while building the ST. LOUIS. He has made a vessel worthy of an artist, as far as water line goes, and we have no doubt she is excellent below.
The PRINCETON, built at Perrysburgh, has an upper deck cabin, with large and comfortable staterooms, and the dining room larger than most of our best steamboats, being more than 100 ft. in length. She has a steerage cabin, much more comfortable than the best cabin used to be a few years ago on board the steamboats, and she is able to berth more passengers both in steerage and upper cabin than any of our steamboats, except those of the largest class.
The PRINCETON has narrow guards, which enable her to give great cabin and passenger room, but we have fears these may be found not the thing in a gale of wind, with a heavy freight. The trial however, is worth making, and if it succeeds, the propellers will be quite as roomy, hereafter, as almost any of our steamboats.
On her way down, she made great speed, being under sail only, as her engines are not yet on board, and the supposition among seamen is that she will not only beat all the other propellers, but will hurry any of our steamboats.
Capt. Pratt, who is, we believe, interested in her, has made every arrangement to accommodate those who may sail with him, and when her two powerful engines are fitted up, we recommend to all our friends a visit to the boat and her commander, when they will see how well comfort and economy can be combined.
We shall speak more of this vessel at some future period. She is still too unfinished to touch upon many things that ought to be mentioned. This vessel belongs to the "Propeller Line" of the Messrs. Hollister & Co., and is a leviathan of her class.
      National Daily Pilot
      April 9, 1845

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      The propeller PRINCETON, owned by Messrs. Hollister, and belonging to the Chicago line, is now ready to take her place. She is a beautiful boat, one of the best looking propellers on the lakes, and more attention has been paid in her fitting up, to the passenger business, than on board of the others, having 90 berths and 36 staterooms in her cabins, and accommodations for about 250 in the steerage. She leaves tomorrow, for the upper lakes.
      Daily National Pilot, Buffalo
      May 10, 1845

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      THE PROPELLER PRINCETON. - This Great Britain of propellers upon the Lakes, which has been having her machinery somewhat altered at Perrysburgh, for 3 or 4 weeks past, is about to make her appearance upon the waters again. As the dimensions of the PRINCETON have never been given in this paper, some data in relation to her capacity, may not be out of place at this time.
      In length of keel, the PRINCETON is 174 ft., in extreme length, 172 1/2 ft. in breadth of beam, 27 ft., in breadth of beam including her guards, 38 ft.; in depth of hold 10 ft. Her tonnage is about 600 tons.
      The reader will perceive from the dimensions and tonnage of the PRINCETON, that her capacity is enormous, for the carrying of passengers as well as freight. But to get any thing like a definate idea of the structure of this mammoth steam vessel, one should go aboard of her. Her cabins, both Lady's and Gentlemen's, are well furnished as any parlor, being supplied with capacious an well lighted state rooms, the latter extending nearly the whole area of the upper deck. Her steerage cabin is also well adapted to the accommodation of that class of passengers, being airy and very commodious, and affording every convenience that the emigrant can wish.
      It is thought with the alterations which the PRINCETON has undergone, while she has been laid up at Perrysburg, by addind to her strength, so that the engine will be held to its place which was found before too powerdul for its fastenings, that the difficulties which she heretofore labored under will hereafter be entirely obviated, and that she will take her place again in the Chicago Line in fulfillment of the original intentions of her owners, as the mammoth steam propeller upon our lakes.
The owners of the PRINCETON are principally Capt. Pratt and Messrs. Hollister of Buffalo, Capt. Pratt is of course the commander. - Maumee River Times.
      Daily National Pilot, Buffalo
      Wednesday, August 27, 1845

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Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
launch &c.
Date of Original:
1845
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.E.3440
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Princeton (Propeller), 1 Mar 1845