The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Dean Richmond (Schooner), 17 Jul 1856


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FOR LIVERPOOL. - We learn from the Chicago Press that the new and splendid craft, DEAN RICHMOND, has been chartered to carry a cargo of wheat direct from that port to Liverpool, and will sail in the course of eight or ten days, in command of Capt. Dan Pearce. She takes 14,000 bushels of wheat at 30 cents freight. It is the intention of Capt. Pearce, if freight offers, to work a trip up the Mediterranean before he returns.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Thursday, July 3, 1856

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      Chicago, July 17. - The schooner DEAN RICHMOND cleared this afternoon with 12,000 bushels of wheat for Liverpool, England, direct. She takes part of her cargo at Milwaukee. Freight 30 cents.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Friday, July 18, 1856

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      Marine News.
The Schooner Dean Richmond, with a full cargo of wheat from Chicago and Milwaukee for Liverpool, passed Detroit Sunday last.
      Oswego Daily Times
      Thursday, October 31, 1856

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      The schooner DEAN RICHMOND, which cleared at Chicago a short time ago, with a cargo of wheat for Liverpool, left this port yesterday afternoon for Quebec, in tow of the steam tug JAMES McKENZIE, on her way across the ocean. By persons competant to judge, she is thought to be "over masted," while it is objected that her bowsprit has not sufficient elevation to clear the rolling seas of the Atlantic. The writer observed two ladies on board; for their safety, and for the safety of all concerned, we sincerely wish the vessel a speedy and safe voyage. - [ Montreal Gazette, 15.]
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Thursday, August 21, 1856

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      DIRECT TRADE BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND THE FAR WEST OF AMERICA.
      From the Liverpool Daily Post, Sept. 24.
It is only within the last week that a most important question has been solved, one which has deservedly received great attention on the other side of the Atlantic, viz. - Whether it is practicable and profitable to carry on a direct trade between Chicago, the 'ultima thule' of the American lakes, and this country, without transhipment or forwarding via Buffalo and New York, the course hitherto generally adopted. Experience proves not only the feasibility but the benefits of this through traffic. There is now in the Queen's Dock a vessel of 387 tons burthen, the DEAN RICHMOND, which has not only made the passage from Quebec, but has traversed 2,400 miles of inland water, bearing a cargo of 400 tons of grain, the first vessel and the first cargo which ever arrived here direct from Chicago, opening a new field for commercial enterprize, marking an epoch in the annals of the far west.
Nor is it a matter of local importance, or likely to result in the benefits of American interests only, else we should not refer to it. World-wide advantages may follow. Great benefits to us must arise from the success of this plan. Whatever conduces to cheapen food, facilitate its delivery, and increase its supply, must be to the general good; and the arrival of the DEAN RICHMOND gives promise of being the forerunner and opener of a trade which will produce the above results.
That we may not be supposed to have overrated the importance of Chicago, it may be as well to state a few facts with reference to the trade of that port. The population in 1850 was 29,000; in 1856 it has increased to 104,000. The shipments in 1855 were 2,200,000 Qrs., being the largest quantity shipped from any one port in the world; pork 77,000 brls; beef, 56,000 brls; imports, 40,000 tons iron; 110 tons coal; lumber 325 millions superficial feet; arrivals, 6,610 vessels, of 1,608,845 tons. The port possesses storage in warehouses for 500,000 qrs, of grain, at which 400 ton vessels have been loaded in four hours. We are indebted to Mr. Richmond and Captain Pierse, the owners of the DEAN RICHMOND, for these statistics.
It should not be forgotten that all this trade was carried on under the disadvantageous circumstances already referred to, all these vessels laden merely to be discharged into others, not one having come direct to Great Britain but the DEAN RICHMOND. To what vast proportions may not such a trade be extended, when provided with greater facilities ? Have we not all cause to hope that the experiment, so successfully brought to a close, may eventuate in a constant communication, to the mutual benefit of all ?
The north-western States, with their great railway and canal facilities, can lay down at the lake ports larger quantities of grain, at less cost, and deliver the same in England in a shorter time that the countries on the Black Sea. Hitherto, as we have stated, the trade has been carried on via New York, the goods passing through three or four different hands ere they reach England, each change entailing a commission, besides loss of time, and three several freights - in the aggregate amounting this season to 13s 8d per quarter, with an unusually low rate of carrage to Buffalo. The Black Sea freight at present are 13s per quarter, and the usual voyage from Galatz 60 to 100 days. The DEAN RICHMOND has made the entire passage in 60 days, including 12 days detention in the St. Lawrence, which would not be likely to occur; vessels, therefore, may be expected to make the run in 50 days; while a vast saving in expense will be gained, the freight and charges being less by several shillings than via New York or from the Black Sea. The canal dues on a cargo of 400 tons and the ship amount to 30 Pound, and steam tugs 30 Pound more; there are no port charges, light dues, or pilotage on the lake, and therefore the saving of commissions and freight is not counterbalanced by other imposts.
Another important matter is the improved condition of the grain which a direct trade would secure. At present the Liverpool merchants complain with justice of the state of wester grain when received via New York and Montreal, in large ships. That now discharging from the DEAN RICHMOND is in as good condition as when shipped, thus showing the advantage of the direct trade in vessels of 300 to 400 tons.
Nor should it be forgotten that the west requires the manufactures of Great Britain. Our iron, hardware, erthenware, &c., are imported via New York, imports, like exports, passing through several hands, increasing cost and occasioning delay. These goods could be imported direct, to the benefit of all concerned.
Now for a few words respecting the vessel, (which, with the cargo, came consigned to Messrs. Bigland, Athya & Co., of this port.) The DEAN RICHMOND is a fore and aft schooner of 380 tons register; her length is 145 feet over all; beam 26 feet; depth of hold 12 feet. She drew nine and a half feet with 400 tons of wheat in her, and has beaten many vessels from Quebec by two and three weeks. The DEAN RICHMOND is built entirely of oak; except the decks, and is fitted with a new centre-board, which in deep water gives her a draught of 18 feet. She has immense spars for her size, and altogether has a very rakish appearance. At present she is the largest vessel which can come through the canals; but by a moderate outlay upon them we are given to understand ships of 800 to 1,000 tons could easily by admitted.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Friday, October 17, 1856

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      Departed Montreal with cargo of wheat for Liverpool, England July 7, 1856 and arrived at Liverpool on September 17, 1856. Was sold to British buyers for $27,000. Reportedly in staves trade from England to Brazil in 1859. Final US register surrendered at Liverpool, England, January 9, 1858, and endorsed "sold to foreign buyers."
      Institute for Great Lakes Research
      Master Sheet on Dean Richmond

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FIRST VESSEL FOR LIVERPOOL DIRECT -The fine new schooner DEAN RICHMOND is chartered to take wheat to Liverpool direct, without trans-shipment, via the St. Lawrence, at 30c per bushel. This is but the commencement of direct shipments to Europe from this port. The advantage gained by rapid and uninterrupted communication with the grand markets of the old world, which the St. Lawrence route most unquestionably furnishes, has yet to be fully tested. We are satisfied that it will occupy the proper place in the public attention. The Richmond is a clipper built craft, built in Cleveland, and commanded by Capt. Pearce. Success to him and his new enterprise. May he have many imitators in his new extension of shipping enterprise.
      Chicago Tribune
      June 28, 1856

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CHICAGO AND LIVERPOOL - Yesterday evening witnessed the first departure of a Chicago vessel from this port direct to Europe. The vessel is the schooner DEAN RICHMOND, owned by Charles Y. Richmond of this city, and her captain, D. Columbus Pierce. She takes a cargo of 16,000 bushels of wheat, owned by the vessel owners, direct to Liverpool via the Welland canal, the St. Lawrence river, &c. She is a very staunch, new schooner, just built by Lenaire (sic) & Martin, of Cleveland, after the same model of the GOLD HUNTER, built by the same shipwrights for Mather & Co. of this city; and the best judges say she is perfectly safe in any sea, and could double Cape Horn with ease. Her capacity can be judged from the cargo taken. She left our harbor in tow of the steam tug HAMILTON MORTON, and had the British ensign as well as the American stars and stripes floating from her different mast-heads. A number of the Board of Trade members accompanied the vessel an hour's sail on her voyage, all of whom are deeply interested in this first experiment of shipping direct to Europe.
      Chicago Tribune
      July 18, 1856

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INSURANCE ON THE DEAN RICHMOND - It having been ascertained that the insurance companies were averse to taking full risks on the DEAN RICHMOND, and her cargo, for a trip to Liverpool, the Chicago Board of Trade have undertaken to effect the object by individual subscriptions, the Chicago insurance companies taking each a risk of $2,500. The whole amount had not been made up on Saturday, but will be before the vessel leaves Milwaukee, as our businessmen feel too great an interest in the experiment of shipping grain direct from Chicago to Europe, to allow the opposition of Eastern insurance companies to stand in the way. We doubt not that the owners of the vessel, C.Y. Ricmond and Capt. Pierce, would go on without insurance and at their own risk, relying on their splendid vessel and "good luck" rather than fail in the experiment. But they will not be compelled to do so.
      Chicago Press
      July 21, 1856

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THE SCHOONER DEAN RICHMOND - This schooner, bound from Chicago to Liverpool direct with a cargo of wheat, arrived at this port on Sunday morning last (27th), and left this afternoon. We learn that she, with another boat, was towed down the St. Clair Flats by the tug JULIUS D. MORTON, and that the tug LION was towing up three vessel: several of the vessels collided, causing some outside damage to the bows of the DEAN RICHMOND, and somewhat disfiguring one or two other vessels. The DEAN RICHMOND presented a fine appearance, bearing the international colors, and we are happy to learn that no delay was caused by the slight accident she met with.
      Detroit Free Press
      July 29, 1856

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SCHOONER DEAN RICHMOND - We learn from Mr. Kershaw, who shipped the wheat from this city by the Dean Richmond, bound for Liverpool, that the RICHMOND reached Lake Ontario all right, on Saturday (Aug 2), and would soon be wending her way down the noble St. Lawrence to the ocean. Mr. Kershaw also informed us that he had received a letter from a gentleman who had read in the *Sentinel* the account of the DEAN RICHMOND's departure hence for Liverpool, ordering him to charter and load a vessel with wheat, direct for Glasgow.
      Milwaukee Sentinel
      Aug 5, 1856
      (copied in Detroit Free Press the 8th)

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THE SCHOONER DEAN RICHMOND - The Thorold (C.W.) *Gazette,* of the 6th inst., gives the proceedings of a public meeting held there to welcome the schooner DEAN RICHMOND, now on her way to Liverpool, from Chicago. A lengthly address was made to the Captain and owners by a deputation of the citizens.
      Detroit Free Press
      Aug 14, 1856

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THE DEAN RICHMOND - This vessel, which cleared at Chicago a short time ago, with a cargo of wheat for Liverpool, left this port yeaterday afternoon for Quebec, in tow of the steam-tug JOHN MACKENZIE, on her way across the ocean. By persons competant to judge, the D. R. is thought to be "over-masted," while it is objected that her bowsprit has not sufficient elevation to clear the rolling seas of the Atlantic. The writer observed two ladies aboard: for their safety, and the safety of all concerned, we sincerely wish the Dean a speedy and safe voyage.
      Montreal Gazette
      Aug 15, 1856
(copied in the Detroit Free Press of the 24th)

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We learn from a late number of the Montreal "Pilot" that the schooner DEAN RICHMOND, which left Chicago a few weeks since with a full cargo of wheat for Liverpool direct, passed that port on the 15th inst.
      Detroit Free Press
      Aug 22, 1856

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      Direct Trade with Europe--Sale of the DEAN RICHMOND
      Liverpool, Nov. 15, 1856

      Perceiving in the paper published here an extract taken from your edition of the 18th ult. relative to the price fo the "DEAN RICHMOND," and drawing a comparison from the sale of sail vessel with what her cost was, a profit is set forth of $9,520; and fearing such statement would lead many others to follow the example set, of sending their vessels here for sale, our object in addressing you is simply to put the matter in its proper light which you will perceive on going into figure gives a loss and not a profit. The vessel sold for ¬£2,600 or say $13,000; she cost as stated in your paper, $19,000; less in dollars; $6,000.
      We have no desire to check the feeling that is gaining ground, of sending vessels with grain cargoes direct, but, on the contrary, hail the enterprise with delight but would like your neighbors to know exactly how matters stand, or we shall soon lose the traffic so well begun; and we are sure you will do all in your power to put the transaction in it[s] proper light, and conclude you have been misinformed in the present instance.
      Before concluding we say a word in the sort of vessels to send. The DEAN RICHMOND had a sliding keel. This is an objection, and millitates against the sale as it interferes with the vessel getting a class at Lloyd's and we would advise your neighbors sending forward their ships with fixed keels and copper fastened, not iron fastened; then the field becomes wide for purchasers and the [more?] competition you can bring to bear, the more likely you are to obtain best price.
      Yours very respectfully
      Cunard, Breit & Austin
      Weekly British Whig
      December 11, 1856, p. 1



Morris E. Lee, marine attorney and adjuster at Cape Vincent, N. Y., took from the lakes to Europe the first centre board schooner that ever crossed the Atlantic. The name of the schooner was DEAN RICHMOND.
      Marine Review
      April 2, 1896


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Liverpool voyage
Date of Original:
1856
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.E.3604
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Dean Richmond (Schooner), 17 Jul 1856