The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Detroit Free Press (Detroit, MI), 11 Jul 1902


Description
Full Text
THE THOMAS W. LAWSON, LARGEST SAILING VESSEL EVER CONSTRUCTED, TO BE LAUNCHED TO-DAY

At Quincy, Mass., to-day will be launched a boat that has the three-fold distinction of being the largest sailing vessel ever built, the first American-built steel-hulled schooner, and the only seven-masted schooner ever constructed. She is owned by a syndicate which includes Thomas W. Lawson, the "copper king" of Boston, and for him the ship has been named. He has shown his appreciation by presenting the vessel with the finest set of colors that have ever floated from a masthead. From bowsprit to stern this wonderful craft measures 500 feet. Within the enormous hull, which has a displacement of 11,000 tons, there is room for a cargo of 8,100 tons. Each mast is 155 feet high. The enormous spread of sail will be moved by five engines and another engine will run the capstan. The interior of the Lawson will be lighted by electricity, a telephone system will connect the various sections and the cabin accomodations will be ample. Her cost will be $250,000, and she will be sailed by a crew of sixteen men.**


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Below a sketch of the vessel. LAWSON was 369x50x35, 5218 gt, and carried 43,000 square feet of sails. The lakes steel schooner-barge MAIA, part of a class of the largest steel lake barges built by Chicago Shipbuilding in 1898, was 376x48x26, 3804 gt. These vessels were technically schooner-barges, but that is a stretch, as only a few had masts at all and none are known to have carried sails.
Date of Original:
11 Jul 1902
Local identifier:
GLN.1916
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
Dave Swayze
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Detroit Free Press (Detroit, MI), 11 Jul 1902