The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Atlantic (Steamboat), 20 Mar 1852


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WARD'S STEAMERS ON LAKE ERIE, HURON AND MICHIGAN.
      We give below a list of Messrs. E. B. & S. Ward's Steamers, (says the Detroit Tribune,) and the routes on which they will be engaged on Lake Erie, Huron and Michigan, during the year 1852. These arrangements may not all be considered permanent for the season, but on the opening of navigation, they will be disposed of as follows:--

      " The OCEAN, which has obtained a world-wide celebrity and popularity, has no superior (except the MAY FLOWER,) on the Western waters. She was built in 1849, is 247 feet long, 33 feet beam, 13 feet depth of hold, 1100 tons burthen and is propelled by a low pressure engine of 69 inch cylinder and 11 feet stroke. Her average speed in 16 miles, and her cost $100,000. She will take her old place in the North Shore Line, between Detroit and Buffalo, in connection with the Michigan Central Railroad, under the command of Capt. Mc Bride, formerly of the ATLANTIC. Capt. Willoughby, her old and favorite commander, will take the MAY FLOWER.

      The ATLANTIC, Capt. Petty, (formerly Mate,) was built in 1848, is 261 feet long, 33 feet beam, 13 feet 6 inches depth of hold, 1150 tons burthen, low pressure engine 60 inch cylinder and 11 feet stroke. Her average speed in 15 miles -- cost $75,000. She also will resume her station in the North Shore Line.

      The CASPIAN, Capt. C. K. Cooper, was built in 1850, is 252 feet long, 31 feet beam, 12 feet depth of hold, 900 tons burthen, low pressure engine, 60 inch cylinder, 10 feet stroke, her average speed is 15 miles. Cost $75,000. She will run in the North Shore Line, in connection with the OCEAN and ATLANTIC, until the MAY FLOWER is ready to take her old position.

      The ST. LOUIS, Capt. Hopkins, 618 tons burthen, low pressure engine, will run between Detroit and Cleveland until the CLEVELAND is ready to take her place.

The CLEVELAND, Capt. C. C. Stannard, will run between Cleveland and Detroit during the season -- leaving Detroit at 6 P. M. , and Cleveland at 6 P. M.

      The PEARL, Capt. Goodsell, is one of the most beautiful and perfect river boats in the United States. She was built in 1851 -- is 160 feet long, 21 feet beam, 275 tons burthen, low pressure engine, 34-1/2 inch cylinder, 9 feet stroke. She will run regularly during the season between Detroit, St. Clair and Lexington, leaving Detroit every Monday, Wednesday and Friday morning.

      The HUDSON, Capt. Cottrell, is a new boat of 450 tons burden, 165 feet long, 24 feet beam, 9 feet 6 inches hold, low pressure engine, 31 inch cylinder, and 8 feet stroke. She will make two trips a week to Saginaw, regularly during the season.

      The LONDON, Capt. Robinson, 433 tons burthen, low pressure engine, will leave Detroit every Tuesday for Sault Ste. Marie, via Mackinac.

The SAM WARD, Capt. Eastbrook, 440 tons burthen, low pressure engine, will leave Detroit once a week. Friday, for Sault Ste. Marie via Mackinac.

The PENINSULA, Propeller, Capt. Jones, will make two trips a month between Cleveland and Sault Ste. Marie, touching at Detroit, Lexington, Point Au Barque, Au Sauble, and Thunder Bay Island.

      The ARCTIC, Capt. Butlin, 800 tons burthen, low pressure, built in 1850: The PACIFIC, Capt. Howe, 500 tons burthen, low pressure, built in 1848, and the TELEGRAPH, Capt. Burr, 481 tons burthen, low pressure, will form the line from Chicago, touching at the intermediate ports, to Three Rivers, Wisconsin.

The DETROIT, 365 tons burthen, low pressure, will probably run between Grand Haven and Milwaukee, Wis.

      The FOREST CITY, Capt. N. L. Pierce, a new boat of 550 tons burthen, low pressure, will run between Detroit and Cleveland, in connection with the Michigan Central Railroad Co. Her model indicates great speed.

      A new steamboat of 600 tons burthen now building at Newport, with a low pressure engine of 32 inch cylinder and 11 feet stroke, will take the place of the SAM WARD on the Sault Ste. Marie route about the 20th of June.

      Messrs. Wards own, and will have in actual commission this season sixteen steamboats, of a total of 9,162 tons, and aggregate cost of $700,000. Twelve years ago, their Lake Fleet consisted of the steamer HURON, of 147 tons, and a schooner, called the HARRISON, cost of both $20,000.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Saturday, March 20, 1852


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Ward's steamers, list
Date of Original:
1852
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.E.7229
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Atlantic (Steamboat), 20 Mar 1852