The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Rough & Ready (Schooner), sunk by collision, 9 Jun 1847


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ANOTHER COLLISION. - We learn from the Cleveland Herald, of the 10th inst. that the steamer CONSTELLATION ran into the schooner ROUGH & READY, on the same night as that of the collision between the CHESAPEKE and PORTER. The schooner immediately sunk, but all on board were saved.
      Buffalo Daily Courier
      Monday, June 14, 1847

      . . . . .

      Schooner ROUGH & READY, we understand this vessel, which was run down night before last by the CONSTELLATION, had on board 600 barrels of flour and 4,000 bushels wheat. She was a new scow built schooner, from our own shipyards, and owned in part by her commander, Capt. Ballou.
      Cleveland Herald
      Wednesday, June 16, 1847

      . . . . .

ROUGH & READY Schooner, was ran into and sunk near Conneaut by the steamer CONSTITUTION. Vessel and Cargo loss about $7,000
      Buffalo Courier (casualty list)
      March 17, 1848

      . . . . .

      ROUGH & READY Scow, ran into near Conneaut by the Steamer CONSTELLATION June 9, 1847 and sunk - cargo 5,000 bushels corn, 500 barrels flour - crew all saved. Vessel loss $2,000; corn loss $3,000; flour loss $2,000 - Total $7,000.
      Casualty List for 1847
      Erik Hyle's private papers

NOTE :- Difference on Steamers name ? suggest CONSTELLATION

      . . . . .

The schooner "ROUGH & READY," of Cleveland, came in collision with the steamer CONSTELLATION on Thursday and sunk. At first it was supposed to be the schooner of the same name, of Detroit, but it proves not to be the case.
      Detroit Free Press
      Sat. June 12, 1847

      . . . . .

      The schooner ROUGH & READY, which had a collision with the steamer CONSTELLATION, had on board 4,000 bushels wheat and 500 bbls. flour, insured. The vessel belonged to the captain and a Mr. Thompson of Chicago, and is a wreck
      Detroit Free Press
      Monday, June 14, 1847

      . . . . .

      U. S. Steamer " MICHIGAN."
      Erie, Penn., June 16, 1847.
Gentlemen :- We left port on the 11th inst., after hearing of the disaster which had befallen the schooner " ROUGH and READY," laden with grain and flour, consigned to R.H. Heywood, Esq., of Buffalo, and after cruising about three hours came opposite Northeast, some 18 or 20 miles from this place, with floating pieces of wrecks and barrels of flour, some three miles from shore.
      We secured 132 barrels of flour, though we saw nothing of the schooner, which has probably drifted down the lake or gone to pieces in the late gale. We also picked up one satin vest, containing a gold pen and silver case, two sixpenny pieces, one lead pencil and a black silk handkerchief, and a bill against Mr. Little, probably the steward of the " CHESAPEAKE." Also one black frock coat, containing two pairs of gloves, two pocket handkerchiefs, one tobacco box, and three yards of ribbon. Also three boxes of little or no value
      Stephen Champlain
      Commander U. S. N.
      Buffalo Daily Courier
      June 18, 1847
     
      . . . . .

The schr. ROUGH AND READY, of Cleveland, was run into by the steamer CONSTELLATION, when abreast of this port, on Wednesday night last. The ROUGH AND READY was a scow built schooner and had 600 barrels of flour and 4,000 bu. of wheat. She went down immediately; the crew saved; the steamer not materially injured. On Friday the ROUGH AND READY was met by the steamer CHAMPION below Erie, the hull just visible. The captain of the CHAMPION made fast to the wreck and attempted to tow it into Erie, but it was so filled with water that the effort was ineffectual.
      The Conneaut Reporter
      June 17, 1847
      . . . . .

On Wednesday night the 9th inst. the stm. CONSTELLATION ran into the schr. ROUGH AND READY, about 6 miles below Conneaut. Threatening to sink, the hands immediately took refuge on board the CONSTELLATION. She floated down the lake past Barcelon, where a steamer took her in tow, and we believe, she is now in port at Buffalo. The ROUGH AND READY is owned at Cleveland, and was laden with flour, grain and seed.

We are indebted to the politeness of Capt. Champlin commander of the U.S. Steamer MICHIGAN, for the following account of the bearings of the schr. JOHN PORTER and of the stm. CHESAPEAKE, sunk off Conneaut on Wednesday nightof last week, from coming in collision.
The MICHIGAN with commendable dilegence collected all the furniture, trunks, baggage and freight from the wrecked vessels that could be found, and brough them into port. She also picked up some 130 barrels flour, which is supposed to have floated from the schr. ROUGH AND READY, and which was run into by the stm. CONSTELLATION, on the same night and near the same place where the CHESAPEAKE and PORTER came in collision.
      Erie Gazette
      June 17, 1847

      . . . . .

      CIRCUIT COURT
      Reported for the Commercial Advertiser. September 26, 1849
The case of Heywood vs. Clark, Administrator, &c., was finally concluded this evening. It was an action on the cause brought by the plaintif for the loss of a cargo of flour and corn, shipped on board the schooner ROUGH and READY, occasioned by a collision between the defendant's steamboat, CONSTELLATION, Capt. E. Clark and the schooner.
It appears that in June 1847, the ROUGH and READY, coming down the lake, was met by the steamboat between Erie and Conneaut, about 11 o'clock P.M., having the Brig GIDDINGS and another vessel in tow. A collision ensued by which the schooner was sunk and the cargo of flour and corn mainly lost.
The cause was considered and treated as highly important, in consideration as well of the amount of the loss sustained, as of the principle involved in the action--regulating the relative rights and duties of all, who navigate the lake
The plaintif had no interest in the ROUGH and READY, but had chartered her as a common carrier to transport his produce, and for this reason the defendant's counsel moved the Court to non-suit the plaintif. Holding, that as the owner of the schooner, having possession of the vessel and cargo, was at all events, liable to the plaintif for all his loss, he should have been the plaintif for the recovery of all the damages occasioned by the collision. The Circuit Judge overruled the motion and decided that, although the owner of the schooner might be liable to him, the plaintif had a right of action directly against the party who had committed the injury by which his property was lost. But that in establishing the liability of the defendant, the plaintif would be held responsible for any negligence or improper management on the part of those having charge the ROUGH and READY in the same degree as if the suit were on behalf of her owner--consequently the main question for the consideration of the Court and Jury, by whose negligence or misconduct was the collision occasioned ? And upon this question many witnesses were examined on both sides and a great amount of testimony exhibited.
It appears the lights of the respective vessels were discovered by each, when they were some four miles distance, and when there was no apprehension or danger of a collision. The plaintif attempted to establish that when the lights of the steamboat were first discovered on board the ROUGH and READY she was on her usual course down the lake, and that the steamboat was on a track some half or three-quarter of a mile in land pursuing her course up. That the first mate of the ROUGH and READY took her helm and altered her course one point to the left, carrying the vessel farther out to sea so as to give the steamboat a wider berth. That the steamboat changed her course to the right with the apparent intention of passing on the outside of the schooner, when she ought to have kept her course and passed her inside towards the land.
On the other side the defendant's alleged and attempted to show that the line on which the ROUGH and READY was standing, was inside the steamboat, and that the schooner altered her course so as to pass on the outside of the steamer, and necessarily crossing her track and rendering the collision unavoidable.
Thus each party contended that the collision was occasioned by the neglence, carelessness or improper management of those having the direction of their respective vessels----and on the part of the defendant it was argued that the plaintif, to recover, must, in addition, show that he was himself without fault.
The case was ably tried by General Williams and Verplauck for the plaintif, and Messrs Sherwood & Havens for defendant, all of whom submitted their views in a very concise and intelligent manner to the Jury. The Circuit Judge gave the cause to the Jury in a plain, intelligent and eloquent charge, designating the respective duties of the Court and Jury and their independence of each other in their discharge. That, although it was true that the collision was occasioned by, or was the unavoidable consequence of the conduct of the ROUGH and READY, the plaintif could not recover----still the plaintif was not bound to show he was not at fault.
A man has no right to place a log in the highway, whereby a traveller's carriage may be injured----but if the traveller sees the log, and unnecessarily runs his carriage upon it, he has no action. And although the ROUGH and READY had changed her course when she ought not to have done it----it the steamboat, by a judicious and proper management could have avoided her, she was bound to do so.
There can be no exact rule laid down to govern this case, and no general rule so good as that established by the Great Law Giver, from its benign influence and Christian percept called the Golden Rule----that under all circumstances a man should do unto his neighbor as he would have it done unto him. The strict observance of this rule was the line of every man's duty, and must control this case. And if neither part has violated this and damages and loss had ensued, nobody was liable----and the party who had suffered must bear his loss. That it was for the Jury, in the light which the evidence afforded, to apply this rule to the case in hand, and that party should suffer who had violated it. After recapitulating and commenting upon the testimony and its bearing upon the case, the Judge submitted the cause. It had been settled and agreed on between the parties, that if the plaintif was entitled to recover, he should have the sum of $5,535.31.
The Jury having retired, upon short consultation returned a verdict for the plaintif for that sum.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      Thursday, September 27, 1849 p.2

      . . . . .

      From the Buffalo Courier
U.S. Steamer MICHIGAN, Erie, Penn., June 16, 1847
Gentelmen: - We left port on the 11th inst., after hearing of the disaster which had befallen the schr. ROUGH AND READY, laden with grain and flour consigned to R.H. Haywood, of Buffalo and afte cruising about 3 hours came opposite Northeast, some 18 or 20 miles from this place, with floating pieces of wreck and barrels of flour, some 3 miles from shore.
We secured 132 barrles of flour, though we saw nothing of the schooner, which has probably drifted down the lake or gone to pieces in the last gale. We also picked up one satin vest containing a gold pen and silver case, tow six penny pieces, one lead pencil and a black silk handkerchief, and a bill against Mr. Lyttle, probably the steward of the CHESAPEAKE. Also one black frock coat, containing 2 pairs of gloves, 2 pocket handkerchiefs, one tobacco box, and 3 yards of ribbon. Also 3 boxes of little or no value.
      Respectfully Yours,
      Stephen Champlin
      Commander U.S.N.
      Conneuat Reporter
      June 16, 1847


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk by collision
Lives: nil
Hull damage: $2,000
Cargo: $5,500
Freight: flour & wheat
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1847
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.578
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ohio, United States
    Latitude: 41.94756 Longitude: -80.55424
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Rough & Ready (Schooner), sunk by collision, 9 Jun 1847