The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Detroit Free Press (Detroit, MI), 16 Sep, 1870, page 4


Description
Full Text

DRY DOCK AT PORT HURON - Messrs Fitzgerald and Leighton purchased in Buffalo the hull of the old Plymouth Rock and brought the same to this city to use as a dry dock. The Plymouth Rock was a side-wheel steamer, which once plied between Buffalo and Detroit, but was converted to a dry dock about six years since. Another hull from the same line was taken to Saginaw last spring and is being used as a dry dock there. The Plymouth Rock contains a thirty horse-power engine, capable of pumping her out in an hour and a quarter, and is fitted up complete for receiving vessels. Only one man is required to attend to the operation. The dry dock thus constituted is 250 feet long, 44 feet in breadth, 18 feet mean depth, and 14 feet to the blocks. Vessels 220 feet in length, 36 feet beam, and drawing 12 feet of water, can be received. She is now lying in Black River, but a place is being prepared just above Messrs. F. & L.'s ship-yard, where the dock will be permanently located. One of Brown's dredges from the Flats is expected on Monday next, to make the necessary excavation, and the proprietors confidently expect to be ready for business the latter part of the week. The gates will be down the stream so that vessels can be easily run from the ship-yard into the dry dock. Its cost in Buffalo was $3,000, and $2,000 more to tow it here and get it into position. - [Times.


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Column 7 The hull converted to a drydock at Bay City, Michigan, (not Saginaw) on the Saginaw River, was the PLYMOUTH ROCK's sister WESTERN WORLD. The Saginaw River dock was used into the 20th Century, and remnants of it are still visible. Articles on the 1854 launches are at this site.      
Date of Original:
16 Sep, 1870
Local identifier:
GLN.3271
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
Dave Swayze
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
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Detroit Free Press (Detroit, MI), 16 Sep, 1870, page 4