The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
C. P. Williams (Schooner), U4364, aground, 25 Aug 1853


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WILLIAMS, C.P. Schooner, beached on Manitou Island, cargo corn. Got off. Property loss $4,394
      Buffalo Express
      Jan. 2, 1854 (casualty list)

      . . . . .

ASHORE. - The Chicago Dem. Press says: " Vessels arriving from below within
the last day or two, have reported having seen a vessel ashore at the Manitous,
which it was feared might be the C.P. WILLIAMS, the new clipper schooner, built
at Michigan City for Thomas Dyer, Esq., of this city, and which left on her
first trip last Sunday evening. A letter received today by her owner from the
Captain, confirms the surmise and conveys the intelligence that she went ashore
on the S.W. shore of the South Manitou, in a dense fog on Tuesday night, the
wind blowing fresh from the South. At the time of writing, she lay easy in nine
feet water, the bottom of clay and rock. She had received no injury, and made
no water, and the Captain thought if she could be lightened a fourth of her
cargo, she could be got off without trouble. She had on 17,500 bushels of
wheat. The propeller ILLINOIS left port last evening at 6 o'clock, to go to her
relief and after taking out her cargo, and hauling her off would proceed with
the grain to Buffalo, while the WILLIAMS would return here. The wind here blew
fresh on yesterday from the South-west, and fears were entertained lest it would
raise a sea that would break her to pieces. The mate, however, who arrived
yesterday afternoon in the schooner FLYING CLOUD, thinks that an out-lying reef
would effectually protect her position.
The WILLIAMS was insured in the Sun Mutual, and Mercantile Insurance Co's.
New York, for $12,000, about equally in each. The cargoe was insured at 60
cents per bushel in the Buffalo Mutual, and Chicago Mutual Insurance Co's."
at 60 cents per bushel in the Buffalo Mutual and Chicago Mutual Insurance
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Tuesday, August 30, 1853

      . . . . .

Schr. C.P. WILLIAMS. - The Chicago Dem. Press says; Passengers by the steamer
GARDEN CITY report that the new schooner C.P. WILLIAMS remained ashore
yesterday morning on the head of the South Manitou. The propeller ILLINOIS, which
went to her assistance, was lying under the lee of the Islands at anchor, waiting for
fair weather, before she proceeded to take out the schooner's cargo.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Saturday, September 3, 1853

      . . . . .

The schooner C.P. WILLIAMS recently ashore at the Manitous, has been gotten
off. The propeller ILLINOIS took off her load of corn and brought it to this city.
The schr. has been found in sailing condition, and was hourly expected at Chicago.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Wednesday, September 7, 1853


      . . . . .

      ARRIVED.-The Chicago Tribune says the new schooner C.P. WILLIAMS, of
Chicago, Capt. Dobson, arrived yesterday afternoon, after having been ashore at
the Manitous, on her passage from Michigan City to Buffalo: She brought back
about 4,000 bushels of corn, the propeller ILLINOIS, which was sent to her relief,
being unable to take the whole of her cargo on board. The WILLIAMS left the
Manitous on Friday evening last, but did not get a fair wind until Monday night
She requires pumping about two-thirds of the time to keep her free of water.
Her rudder is split and many of her seams started, but the full extent of her
injuries cannot be ascertained till she is placed in the dry dock. The captain,
mate and one seaman were sick when the vessel arrived. The sailor was
immediately conveyed to the Marine Hospital; A large number of merchants and
masters of vessels visited the WILLIAMS after her arrival, and all expressed
themselves pleased with her proportions.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Friday, September 9, 1853

      . . . . .

The Chicago Dem. Press says,"the C.P. WILLIAMS went into the Dry Dock on
Saturday, and an examination of her bottom shows that she must have an entire
new keel, and nearly the whole of her bottom must be replanked. The keel is
ground off in many places even with the planking, and the planks are worn half
way through wherever she rested on the rocks. There are no holes in her, there
are spots where it would require but little thumping to make one. She does not
appear, from a first inspection, to be strained or otherwise injured. It will
require four weeks to place her in readiness for service. She is pronounced by
all ship builders who have looked at her to be the best built and fastened
vessel on the lakes, and her model combining speed with profitable towage.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Tuesday, September 13, 1853



Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: nil
Freight: corn
Remarks: Got off
Date of Original:
1853
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.2112
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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C. P. Williams (Schooner), U4364, aground, 25 Aug 1853