The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Arctic (Steamboat), aground, 29 May 1860


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Steamer ARCTIC, stranded on Huron Island, Lake Superior. Total loss, May 1860. Property loss $30,000
      Buffalo Morning Express
      March 11, 1861. (Casualty list, 1860)

      . . . . .

ARCTIC, steamer of 861 tons. Built Newport, Mich., 1851. Home port (1851) Detroit. Stranded Huron Island, Mich. May 29, 1860. No lives lost.
      Merchant Steam Vessels of the U.S.A
      Lytle - Holdcamper List 1790 - 1868

      . . . . .

      THE ARCTIC
      The Detroit Tribune furnishes some additional particulars in regard to the loss of the steamer ARCTIC:
"The officers were all on deck at the time the calamity occurred. The point on which the ill-fated steamer struck is one remarkably bleak and rocky, and the passengers were panic-stricken. The officers maintained their coolness and
self possession in a manner which elicited the highest encomiums. They thought of nothing but the safety of the lives and property entrusted to their care.
"The ARCTIC was commanded by Capt. F.S. Miller, and was owned by the Clement Steamboat Co., of which J. Hutchins, Esq. is a stock-holder and agent. She was 8 years old, and valued by the Underwriters at $30,000. Some $8,000 was expended on her last season, and she was considered every way sea worthy. She was purchased by the Company about three years ago of E.B. Ward, Esq., by whom she was insured for $16,000, which was the only insurance upon the boat. We understand it is the intention of the Company to put another steamer up on the
line without delay."
      Cleveland Plain Dealer
      Thursday Evening, June 7, 1860

      . . . . .

      TOTAL LOSS OF THE STEAMER " ARCTIC."
      ------------------------
The steamer FOUNTAIN CITY, Capt. Peck, arrived from Ontonagon last night. She brought news of the total loss of the steamboat ARCTIC, on Tuesday of last week.
The ARCTIC, upward bound, struck the westernmost of the Huron Islands, Lake Superior, between Marquette and Portage Entry, at about half past six o'clock in the morning, in a dense fog, and commenced leaking. Immediately preparations were made by Capt. Miller to stop the leak and work her off, but the sea commenced making soon after, and in a short time, every effort made to save her became fruitless, and she went to pieces. Her engine lies in about four fathoms of water, and her hull and other wood-work were broken into fragments and scattered everywhere.
      The island is rock, and so bluff that one could step from her bows upon it. The passengers and crew were all safely landed, and a portion of the freight. The party remained on the island till Thursday evening, when the FOUNTAIN CITY, passing up, was hailed by a small boat sent out. They were taken aboard and landed at their various ports of destination. Capt. Miller and a portion of the crew came down on the FOUNTAIN CITY, and the remainder will arrive on the SEA BIRD. The freight that was saved was also forwarded.
      The ARCTIC was quite an old boat, and was owned in whole or in part by Mr. John Hutchings of this city. We are not apprised as to her value, insurance, on amount of freight lost, owing to the lateness of the hour of the arrival of the
FOUNTAIN CITY. - Detroit Advertiser.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Thursday, June 7, 1860

      . . . . .

The steamer ARCTIC of the Lake Superior Line struck on one of the Huron Islands on the 28th. and will probably be a total loss. The FOUNTAIN CITY took off her passengers.
The ARCTIC was owned by Drew & Goodrich of Chicago and Hutchins & Dickinson of Detroit. Her insurance amounting to $16,000 has been paid.
      Milwaukee Daily Sentinel
      June 8, 1860

      LOSS OF THE ARCTIC.
A correspondent of the detroit Free Press, writing from Ontonogon, June 1, give some additional particulars of the loss of the steamer ARCTIC:
We left Marquette at 2 A.M.,on Tuesday, the 29th, with sixty-five passengers, and a crew all told of about thirty-five--in all one hundred. At 6 o'clock in the morning the boat hauled up on her course for Portage Entry, and a few moments
after, while running under check, struck the island about eighty rods from the point.
      The captain and first officer were both on deck, but the dense fog which prevailed rendered it impossible to see more than a hundred yards ahead, and it was too late then to attempt to stop. It became at once evident that the boat could not be saved, and the boats were at once lowered and the passengers taken ashore. The baggage, most of the furniture, and provisions followed; the cattle were thrown over and towed to the rocks; a camp built, and everything done to save the freight, --- but a heavy northeast gale springing up, accompanied with a tremendous sea, rendered it impossible. At noon the boat was abandoned, she having sunk to the main deck, with the sea running so the boat could not be
approached with safety. She sank entirely at at 4 P.M., and one hour later the cabins and upper-works were gone, leaving nothing in sight but part of one wheel and the walking-beam. These followed at sunset. The sea was now running mountains high, and was dashing fearfully over the rocks. All the freight which had been thrown upon the rocks near where the vessel struck was washed off, as were also all the cattle excepting two. There were provisions, bedding and tents in abundance on the island, but the latter were but ill calculated to keep out the rain, and the passengers were all thoroughly soaked through before morning. On Wednesday it rained all day, and not until a short time before dark did it clear away. The second night was very comfortably passed under the circumstances, and the passengers awoke on Thursday morning to find a clear, bright day and the weather perfectly calm.
      A boat was sent to Portage Entry at sunrise with the news, but before the Portage Lake boats arrived the steamer FOUNTAIN CITY came in sight and was signaled, and a most welcome sight it was. The passengers were taken on board
leaving the Captain and crew on the island to pick up the scattered freight.
      All of the crew and most of the passengers worked with a will. The officers from the Captain to the cook, behaved like men, and nothing that could be done for the safety and comfort of the passengers under such circumstances was left
undone.
      Cleveland Plain Dealer
      Sat. Evening, June 9, 1860

      . . . . .

The Tribune learns that soon after the opening of navigation on Lake Superior E.B. Ward, will send an expedition provided with all the necessary appliances to recover the machinery of the steamers ARCTIC and GAZELLE, lost last year on Lake Superior.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      March 4, 1861

      . . . . .



Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: nil
Hull damage: $30,000
Freight: cattle, supplies
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1860
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.3952
Language of Item:
English
  • Michigan, United States
    Latitude: 46.95437 Longitude: -87.97735
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Arctic (Steamboat), aground, 29 May 1860