The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Jersey City (Propeller), aground, 25 Nov 1860


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Propeller JERSEY CITY, cargo flour and pork, stranded in a snow storm on Long Point, Lake Erie. Total loss with 19 of her crew.
      Buffalo Morning Express
      March 11, 1861. (Casualty List, 1860)

      . . . . .

      L O S S O F T H E P R O P E L L E R " J E R S E Y C I T Y."
      THE CREW PERISH IN THE STORM.
      The telegraph despatch from Port Dover last night, says the propeller JERSEY CITY, from Cleveland with a cargo of flour and pork, is a total wreck, two miles from Long Point. Sixteen of her crew and one passenger are lost. The saved, are Captain Monroe, two firemen, one wheelsman, and one passenger named Randall. Two bodies were picked up. Those saved report that nearly all reached shore, but perished in the snow storm. The captain and passengers had their hands badly frozen. The two engineers were frozen to death three hundred yards from the light-house, locked in each other's arms. The cargo is strewn along the beach for miles. The captain arrived here today.
Nothing further from the JERSEY CITY has been heard this morning. Mr. Caldwell, the agent of the N.Y. and Erie Railroad, at Dunkirk, passed through this city last night, on his way to the wreck, to make arrangements to secure the bodies of those that have perished, and any portion of the wreck that should be washed ashore. We may probably receive something later from him by telegraph before we go to press.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Wednesday, November 28, 1860

      . . . . .

      THE PROPELLER JERSEY CITY. - Nothing of any great importance has been heard from the wreck of the JERSEY CITY, than we gave in our last. From some sailors who came down on the Buffalo & Lake Huron train last night, we learn that only the four persons that we have before mentioned are known to have been saved. Some more of the bodies had been washed ashore, but we could not learn whether they were identified or not. Mr. Caldwell, the agent, was still on the spot, making every exertion to secure the wreck and cargo that washed ashore.
      This unfortunate propeller was built in 1855, at Cleveland. She was 633 tons burthen, valued at $25,000, and rated A No. 2. She was owned by S. D. Caldwell, of Dunkirk. She was officered by Capt. Monroe, who will be remembered as the brave man who some years since, when the brig OMAH was wrecked in Cleveland, on the West Pier, in a furious storm of wind and snow, risked his own life in saving the half-frozen crew of the brig. He resided somewhere near Dunkirk. The Clerk, A. H. Derby, was from Cleveland. He leaves a wife, to mourn his loss. The first engineer, Mr. Manchester, was a single man, and has a mother and two sisters in western New York, who depended on him for support. A few weeks since he went to the Insurance Agency, in Cleveland, and took out a life insurance policy for $2,000, for the benefit of his mother.
      The mate, ----- Langley, was from Buffalo. These are all the names that we could ascertain.
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Friday, November 30, 1860

      . . . . .

The stm. GENESEE CHIEF left this port on Tuesday (12/4), for the wreck of the JERSEY CITY, at Long Pt. She had a scow in tow, to assist in securing such portions of the wreck and cargo as can be saved.
      Buffalo Morning Express
      December 8, 1860 2-5

      . . . . .

      The Dunkirk Union says that the GENESEE CHIEF returned from Long Point on Tuesday of last week, with the remainder of the cargo of the JERSEY CITY, consisting of 1,300 barrels of flour, and other freight equal to about 400 barrels. Last Saturday the CHIEF went over again to pick up the available portion of the wreck, and brought away everything except the engines and boilers, which lie in about 15 feet of water. On Sunday the body of a man, which had been recently found by the watchman of the cargo, was buried. The body was that of a man 5 1/2 feet high, light complection and hair, was well dressed in sailor's cloths, and was apparently about 33 years old. It was of course impossible to recognise him.
      Detroit Free Press
      April 20, 1861

      . . . . .



Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: 19
Hull damage: $35,000
Cargo: $30,000
Freight: flour & pork
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1860
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.4220
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 42.555833 Longitude: -80.197222
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Jersey City (Propeller), aground, 25 Nov 1860