The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Curtis Mann (Schooner), aground, 25 Nov 1860


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Schooner CURTIS MANN, cargo wheat, ashore in a snow-storm at Goderich, Lake Huron.
      Buffalo Morning Express
      March 11, 1861. (Casualty List, 1860)
     
      . . . . .

      WRECK OF THE SCHOONERS " CURTIS MANN " and "J. S. NEWHOUSE" AT GODERICH.
      (from the Huron Signal Nov. 28)
      A snow storm of unuasual severity for this season of the year has swept Lake Huron since Friday morning last. The fears expressed by those experienced in Lake navigation, that much of the western shipping might be exposed to it's fury, has proved to be too well founded. About dark on the evening of Saturday the 24th., when the gale was at it's height, two American vessels were driven ashore quite close to Goderich Harbour. Owing to the severe frost which accompanied the storm, they had become unmanageable, and were consequently placed at the mercy of the raging elements. The first that struck the beach was the schooner J.S.NEWHOUSE, H.J. Blair, master, from Chicago to Buffalo, with 17,000 bushels of Corn. She now lies at the spot where she first came ashore, a few rods above the north pier, and it is feared that both vessel and cargo are seariously damaged.
      About two hours after dark the schooner CURTIS MANN, E.J. Thomas, master, from Chicago to Buffalo, with 18,000 bushels of wheat, drifted ashore a few rods to the northwards of the J.S. NEWHOUSE. She is also in a precarious position and her cargo is supposed to be badly damaged.
      THE RESCUE
      The officers and crew of both vessels - twenty-one men in all - were saved with great difficulty. The scene presented at the rescue was one of thrilling yet painful interest, and it required the utmost efforts of the willing hands and stout hearts of even sailors to save the distressed on such a night. The snow was sweeping the beach in blinding drifts, and as the raging surf was dashed over the stranded vessels, some of the poor fellows who were clinging to the bulwarks and rigging were frozen to their places - so bitter was the cold - and had to be cut loose by their comrads.
      Although the vessels were near the shore, it was found that the sufferers could not be rescued by means of boats on account of the heavy breakers, and after one boat had been disabled the attempt was given up. Lines were now procured, and after many unsuccessful attempts they were thrown on board and made fast. Communications between the vessels and the shore being thus established the men were all landed safely, atthough several had narrow escapes from drowning, and most were badly frostbitten.
      Much praise is due to Captain T.L. Dancy, of the schooner LILLY; P. Moore; William McKay; .Sanders, and others of our hardy mariners who happened to be in port, and who, at much personal risk, rushed several times into the water in their efforts to throw the lines or to save those who fell, benumbed and powerless into the surf, when attempting to reach the shore. --- Huron Signal Dispatch
      Toronto Daily GLOBE
      Thursday, November 29, 1860
     
     
NOTE - American schooner SUPPLY, of 396 tons built Buffalo 1855 by Hardison. Owned by H.N. Strong. Vessel registered at Detroit. Classed as E.. Valued at $9,000. Remarks, formerly CURTIS MANN, very large repairs in 1861
      Lake Underwriters Register 1864

      . . . . .

      Rescue Of The Crews Of The Schooners NEWHOUSE and CURTIS MANN.
      -------
The Goderich (Lake Huron) Signal, after giving an account of the above-named vessels going ashore in the recent gale, remarks:
      The officers and crews of both vessels, 71 men in all, were saved with great difficulty. The scene presented at the rescue was one of thrilling yet painful interest, and it required the utmost efforts of the willing hands and stout hearts of even sailors to save the distressed on such a night. The snow was sweeping the beach in blinding drifts, and as the raging surf was dashed over the stranded vessels, some of the poor fellows who were clinging to the bulwark and rigging were frozen to their places, and had to be cut loose by their comrades. Although the vessels were near the shore, it was found that the sufferers could not be rescued by means of boats on account of the heavy breakers, and, after one boat had been disabled, the attempt was given up. Lines were now procured, and after many unsuccessful attempts, they were thrown on board and made fast. Communication between the vessels and the shore being thus established, the men were all safely landed, although several had very narrow escapes from drowning, and most were badly frost-bitten.
      Since the above was in type, we are informed that no less than twelve vessels are ashore between Bayfield and Kincardine, but of these we have, up to the time of going to press, no authentic particulars. - Goderich Signal
      Buffalo Daily Republic
      Friday, December 7, 1860
      . . . . .
     
      MARINE. - We understand that a force of thirty men are at work at Goderich, getting off the schooner CURTIS MANN, driven ashore there last fall. Preparations are also being made to get off the schooner J.S. NEWHOUSE, which, our readers will remember, was also wrecked at that place. Both these vessels were employed in the grain trade between Buffalo and the Upper Lakes, during the season of 1860.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      February 26, 1861
      . . . . .

NOTE :- CURTIS MANN rebuilt as schooner SUPPLY

      . . . . .


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: nil
Hull damage: $5,000
Cargo: $18,000
Freight: wheat
Remarks: Got off
Date of Original:
1860
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.4275
Language of Item:
English
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.75008 Longitude: -81.71648
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Curtis Mann (Schooner), aground, 25 Nov 1860