The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Brooklyn (Propeller), U2151, exploded boiler, 22 Oct 1874


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Propeller BROOKLYN, merchandise, exploded on Detroit River October 1874. Total loss 24 lives lost. Property loss hull $24,000, cargo $8,000.
      Casualty List for 1874
      Chicago Inter-Ocean, Dec. 25, 1874


      Story of the propeller BROOKLYN disaster of October 22, 1874: At 2 o'clock p.m., 10 miles below Detroit near the head of Grassy Island, the propeller BROOKLYN's boiler exploded, killing 22. The cause was low water in the boilers. (The Capt. died on the 25th. of Nov. making the total 23)
      Port Huron Daily Times
      Friday, October 23, 1874


The ill-fated BROOKLYN has been raised from the bottom and removed from the channel which is now clear. Two bodies were found in the wreck which were not recognizable. The number now known to have been found lost is twenty-two. The wreckers were recovering the chains and anchors besides other effects on Friday.
      Amherstburg Echo
      November 27, 1874


      The wreck of the BROOKLYN has drifted from the Canadian shore down and across the river until it now lies about a quarter of a mile above Mamajuda light on a line with the lower mill at Ecorse. As it is entirely covered with water, barely visable at night, it is exceedingly dangerous.
      Amherstburg Echo
      May 28, 1875


The wrecking scow the MONEY MAKER is taking a large quantity of bar, rod and scrap iron from the wreck of the propeller BROOKLYN a short distance up the river.
      Amherstburg Echo
      June 4, 1875


      Says the Detroit Tribune:- From personal observations we can state that the wreck of the BROOKLYN should be removed. It lies right off Grassy Island, and certainly no more than 100 feet out of the regular channel. She lies in about twelve feet of water aft, but her pall post is not more than four feet from the surface forward.
      The Toronto Daily Globe
      Tuesday, August 31, 1875



Says the Detroit Tribune: -- From personal observations we can state that the wreck of the BROOKLYN should be removed. It lies right off Grassy Island, and certainly no more than 100 feet out of the regular channel. She lies in about twelve feet of water aft, but her pall post is not more than four feet from the surface forward.
      Amherstburg Echo
      September 3, 1875
     

THE WRECK OF THE BROOKLYN. -- The wreck of the propeller BROOKLYN, of the old V. C. Line, moved during the past winter, owing to the action of the ice, about three hundred feet further down and to the westward, and is nearer to Mama Juda light than formerly, and somewhat further out of the channel. The BROOKLYN lies in about twenty-five or thirty feet of water at present, and about ten feet of water cover the hull. Her pall post, which was visable last summer, is now entirely out of sight. Vessels of ordinary draft could pass over on each side of her. The break or eddy in the water is still visable by daylight. The danger, however, arising from the proximity of the wreck to the main thoroughfare is not so great as it was last season. -- Detroit Tribune.
      Cleveland Herald
      June 17, 1876


      OPERATIONS ON THE BROOKLYN
It is understood that Mr. John Quinn, the well known diver, is at work on the wreck of the Northern Transportation propeller BROOKLYN, which blew up near Fighting Island about five years ago, and which now lies among the rushes near Grassy Island.
      Detroit Post & Tribune
      June 26, 1879


An attempt will be made soon to recover the machinery of the propeller BROOKLYN, which exploded near Fighting Island about nine years ago.
      Cleveland Herald
      July 26, 1881



      The tug PACIFIC, Captain William Littleton, left Detroit Friday with Frank Dwyer, the diver, to search for the wreck of the propeller BROOKLYN, near Fighting Island.
      Cleveland Herald
      Monday, August 1, 1881


      Captain Frank Littleton and Frank Dwyer went down on the tug PACIFIC Sunday and examined the wreck of the propeller BROOKLYN. The forward part of the wreck was found in good condition from the main deck to the keel, but the upper works have all been carried away by the ice. It is not yet known whether an attempt will be made to raise and rebuild the hull.
      Cleveland Herald
      Wednesday, August 3, 1881
     

BROOKLYN Propeller of 466 tons, built 1866 at Cleveland. Official U. S. No. 2151. First home port, Cleveland. Exploded on Detroit River October 22, 1874. 20 lives lost.
      Merchant Steam Vessels of the United States
      the Lytle - Holdcamper list, 1790 to 1868


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: exploded boiler
Lives: 24
Hull damage: $24,000
Cargo: $8,000
Freight: merchandise
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1874
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.11555
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 42.081944 Longitude: -83.125555
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Brooklyn (Propeller), U2151, exploded boiler, 22 Oct 1874