The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
William Sanderson (Schooner), aground, 1 Nov 1874


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CAPTAIN DROWNED. - Messrs. Scott & Brown, of this city, received a dispatch Saturday forenoon from Mackinaw Straits announcing the arrival of the schooner Wm. Sanderson, and that Capt. John Canfield, the master, was drowned, and two of the seamen were disabled. The Sanderson was laden with lumber taken on at Alpena, and was en route to Chicago. It would appear form the dispatch that the vessel otherwise had suffered no damage, but was awaiting additional crew to proceed on her voyage. Capt. Canfield was a resident of Buffalo,
where he leaves a family. His employers speak of him as a thorough and efficient navigator, and in every respect a very worthy man. A new captain, with two seamen, were expected to leave last evening by the propeller City of Concord for the vessel.
      Detroit Tribune
      November 2, 1874



Notes: W. SANDERSON mentioned as being one of the few vessels out on the lakes as a heavy gale hit.
      Detroit Free Press
      November 24, 1874
     
     



Notes:Concern expressed as to the safety of W. SANDERSON, as she left Chicago the 20th, not heard of since. Bound for Oswego with wheat.
      Detroit. Free Press
      November 29, 1874



THE SANDERSON - The last seen of the schooner Wm. Sanderson was at Cheboygan after the gale, at which place she called, it is thought, for repairs, if disabled by the storm. Snow storms subsequently set in which would probably further delay her.
      Detroit. Free Press
      December 1, 1874



MAKING INQUIRIES. - Messrs. Scott & Brown, owners of the schooner W. Sanderson, which is still missing, are making diligent inquiries and collecting all the information possible as to her whereabouts. It is their purpose to obtain the deposition of vessel masters who may have seen the Sanderson and or after her departure from Chicago. Among others thus far heard from is the statement of the captain of the schooner Guiding Star, who is positive he saw the Sanderson come to at Cheboygan, and in this he claims he cannot be mistaken. The
Sanderson had her name painted on her quarter in very large letters, which were plainly discernable at a distance of three-quarters of a mile. If these statements are correct it is plainly the fact that if loss the vessel foundered in Lake Huron and all hands doubtless perished. The Sanderson was full canal size, 385 tons burden and a good sailer. Capt. Brown, her master, was a man of ripe experience and a thorough, practical sailor.
      Detroit Free Press
      December 3, 1874



THE WM. SANDERSON LOST, WITH ALL HANDS. - The fate of the schooner Wm. Sanderson and that of her entire crew, which for some days past has been a mystery to her owners, has at length been solved by the discovery of the wreck broken up at Sleeping Bear, on the east shore of Lake Michigan, with not a soul left to tell the tale of her sad fate. A letter, which is dated at Empire, a place located between Point Betsie and Sleeping Bear, on November 26th, and signed by George Aylesworth, a wood dealer, directed to a Chicago firm, states that the wreck of the Wm. Sanderson was found broken up on the beach, with her small boat attached and not a trace of the crew, appearances indicating that she went to pieces before reaching the shore. The Chicago firm immediately advised Messr. Scoot & Brown, the owners in this city. The Anderson was valued at $22,000, and insured for $15,000. The cargo consisted of 19,500 bushels of wheat consigned to Oswego, and was also insured at the usual proportion. Her freight list was also insured at $1,700. The Sanderson was built at Oswego, by George Goble, and came out in 1853. She had a crew on board of nine persons. Capt. John C. Brown commanded her, and John Woodruff was mate, which are the only names that have thus far been ascertained.
      Detroit Tribune
      December 4, 1874



WRECK OF THE SANDERSON. - Relative to the wreck of the Wm. Sanderson, the Chicago Inter-Ocean of the 3rd says: Empire dock is at the foot of Lake Michigan between Sleeping Bear and Point Betsey. There is a steep sandy bluff extending for miles and lake masters say it is one of the most dangerous localities on the whole chain of lakes. A Mr. George Aylesworth writes from Empire Dock to Mr. O. Schuennemann, of this city, under date of
November 26th, that the wreck has been discovered there; that the boat is with the wreck, and that nothing is known of the crew. The writer says that the vessel is a total loss, having been broken up, and wants to be made custodian of the remains. As announced several days ago, the Sanderson left Chicago November 20th, bound for Oswego. Her cargo consisted of 20,000 bushels of No. 1 wheat shipped by D. W. Irwin & Co. and insured in the Pacific Mutual of New York. She was built at Oswego in 1853, but received repairs last winter, and rated B1. Her measurement was 331 tons, and she was owned in Detroit by Scott & Brown. Valued at $15,000, she was insured for about $12,000 in the Detroit Fire and Marine and other companies.
She was commanded by Capt. Brown, who, if he is lost, leaves a wife and three or four children, who reside in Detroit. It is thought the rest of the crew were mainly from Oswego. Their names cannot be learned.
      Detroit Tribune
      December 4, 1874



GONE TO THE WRECK. - Captain H. L. Brown, of the firm of Scott & Brown, left this city Wednesday evening for Sleeping Bear to examine into the condition of the schooner W. Sanderson, and discover if possible the whereabouts of the crew and if any of the bodies have been cast upon the beach.
      Detroit Free Press
      December 4, 1874



The fate of the schr. WILLIAM SANDERSON and that of her entire crew, which for some days past has been a mystery to her owners, has at length been solved by the discovery of the wreck broken up at Sleeping Bear, on the east shore of Lake Michigan, and not a soul saved. The SANDERSON was valued at $22,000, and insured for $15,000. The cargo consisted of 19,500 bushels wheat consigned to Oswego, and was also insured at the usual proportion. Her freight list was also insured at $1,700. The SANDERSON was built at Oswego, by George Goble, and came out in 1856. She had a crew on board of 9 persons, all told. Captain John C. Brown commanded her, and John Woodruff was mate, which are the only names that have thus far been ascertained. The Captain was married, his wife at present being at Kingsville, Ont.
      Detroit Free Press
      December 4, 1874



CAPT. BROWN RETURNED. - Capt. H. L. Brown, of Scott & Brown, who left here a few days since for Sleeping Bear to investigate concerning the loss of the schooner Wm. Sanderson, has just returned from that place. The vessel, broken up into fragments, was found strewn along the beach for quite a distance, besides portions of her cargo. The bodies of none of her crew has come ashore, and it is quite probable that they were swept from the decks some distance from shore. There is a bar out from shore on which the vessel struck, causing her to break up and become a total wreck in a few moments. Before leaving there Captain Brown employed a watch to be kept along the coast in the event of the bodies coming ashore, that they may receive proper interment.
      Detroit Tribune
      December 8, 1874


      The schooner WILLIAM SANDERSON has been lost with all hands on Lake Michigan. The wife of Captain J. C. Brown, who commanded her, lives at Kingville, Ont.
      Amherstburg Echo
      December 11, 1874



W. SANDERSON Schooner, cargo wheat, total loss with crew on Lake Michigan, November 1874. Property loss, hull $22,000, cagro $25,000.
      Casualty List for 1874
      Chicago Inter-Ocean, Dec. 25, 1874

      . . . . .







Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: all
Hull damage: $22,000
Cargo: $25,000
Freight: wheat
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1874
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.11827
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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William Sanderson (Schooner), aground, 1 Nov 1874