The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Comet (Schooner), sunk, 9 Nov 1835


Description
Full Text

GALE ON LAKE ERIE. -- At Conneaut, Ohio, the schooner FREE TRADER, of Otter Creek, U. C. came ashore on Friday, with only one person alive on board, having been capsized, and thirteen persons lost. The schooner COMET, of this port, it is also feared is lost, her hatches and part of her binnacle having been found, drifted ashore above.
      Buffalo Whig & Journal
      November 18, 1835
     
      . . . . .

THE GALE.-- We continue to receive further particulars in regard to the late gale. The Schooner COMET, Captain Smith, we learn from the Fredonia Censor, foundered 2 miles above Dunkirk, and all on board, 7 individuals, perished. The schooner ALLISON, Capt. Ward, with salt and iron, was driven into Silver Creek harbor, capsized, and filled with water, and 2 hands drowned. One or two wrecks are said to have been seen off Dunkirk on Monday last.
      Cleveland Daily Herald
      Saturday, November 21, 1835 p.2 col.1

      . . . . .

      The schr. COMET, Capt. Green, under the charge of the mate, from Geauga, with castings, having on board 5 passengers and 3 hands is believed to have been lost; the captain having left her some days since for this place by land, has recognized her hatches and masts, drifted ashore a short distance above this harbor. - Dunkirk Beacon.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      November 19, 1835

      . . . . .

      SCHOONER COMET. - There remains no doubt but that this schooner, with six hands and one passenger, has been lost. She left Madison, about 12 miles this side of Grand River, with a cargo consisting of fifteen tons iron, and five tons ashes. She was seen at about 9 o'clock, P.M. by the schooner GEAUGA, at which time she was sailing very rapidly down the lake. The Captain, Seth Green, of this city, had been detained by business, and leaving the schooner in charge of the mate, Robert Haggerty, proceeded down, on board the steamboat UNITED STATES The names of the persons lost, are Robert Haggerty, aged about 22; John Herrin of this city, about 35 years old; Philip DeSilvy, aged 45, Portugeese; Joseph Boclaire, a Frenchman, from near Detroit, 24; John Decker, from Albany, aged about 21; another, name unknown. The COMET is supposed to have stranded on Washington Reef, about a mile above Dunkirk, and about a mile and a half from the shore. Two schooner top-masts, were seen by the passengers on board the PEACOCK, on her last trip, and several articles have floated ashore, which have been recognized as belonging to her. --- Buffalo Commercial Advertiser ( part)
      Buffalo Daily Star
      Thursday, November 26, 1835

      . . . . .

      Schooner COMET. - There remains no doubt that this schooner, with six hands and one passenger, has been lost. She left Madison, about 12 miles this side of Grand River, with a cargo consisting of fifteen tons of iron, and five tons of ashes. She was seen about 9 o'clock P. M. by the schooner Geauga, at which time she was sailing very rapidly down the Lake. The Captain, Seth Green, of this city, had been detained by business, and leaving the schooner in charge of the mate, Robert Haggerty, proceeded down on board the United States. The names of the persons lost are Robert Haggerty, aged about 22; John Herrin, of this city, about 35 years old; Philip Dasilvy, aged 45, Portugese; Joseph Boclaire, a Frenchman, from near Detroit, 24; John Decker, from Albany, where his friends reside, aged about 21; another, name unknown. The Comet is supposed to have stranded on Washington reef, about a mile above Dunkirk, and about a mile and a half from the shore. Two schooner top masts, were seen by the passengers on board the Peacock, on her last trip and several articles have floated ashore, which have been recognized as belonging to her.
The passenger mentioned above, was Truman Chittenden - an orphan - a grandson of the Hon'ble. Truman Chittenden, of Williston, Vt., who was on his way from his uncle's, Henry Chittenden, London, Monroe Co., M. T. Reaching Monroe at a time when no steam boat was expected in, he took passage on board the Comet for Buffalo. On the 9th inst., the Comet then lying in Grand River, he was recognized by a passenger on board the steam boat Monroe, which touched at that place, and to a suggestion to take passage on board the Monroe, he replied: "I wish to observe the manner of navigating a vessel on Lake Erie." Young Chittenden was on his way to Vermont, to attend school. He will be recollected by our citizens, - having resided in this city some two years since. He was about 19 years of age. ---- Buffalo Adv.
      Canadian Emigrant
      Tuesday, December 15, 1835

      . . . . .

COMMENDABLE. - Mr. John Herrin, lost in the Schooner COMET, in the late gale, left in this city a destitute widow and an orphan child. He was a member of Fire Engine Company, No. 3, and at a meeting of that Company, on Monday evening last, a purse of fifty dollars was raised for the widow and child -- which sum was forthwith transmitted to Mrs. Herrin, through the hands of a committee.
      Buffalo Whig & Journal
      December 9, 1835 p. 2, c. 3


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk
Lives: 7
Freight: iron, ashes
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1835
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.13017
Language of Item:
English
  • New York, United States
    Latitude: 42.4795 Longitude: -79.33393
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
Comment on this item
Groups of Related Records
Shipwreck news
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Comet (Schooner), sunk, 9 Nov 1835