The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Albemarle (Schooner), U1730, aground, 1 Nov 1867


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The Detroit Post says the three masted schooner ALBEMARLE is ashore near Duncan City full of water. She is from Escanaba with a cargo of ore.
      Erie Daily Dispatch
      Tuesday, November 19, 1867

      . . . . .

      The Sentinel learns that the schr. ALBEMARLE, sunk in the Straits, has the appearance of being broken in two. Her rails amidships is over 2 ft. under water, while her bow and stern are well out, and her mainmast is badly bent near the masthead by the strain of the triatic stay upon it, caused by the settling of the vessel. As the ABLEMARLE is almost entirely devoid of shear, there is hardly a doubt but she is broken in two and will prove a total loss.
      Detroit Post
      November 19, 1867

      . . . . .

From Lake Huron and the Straits - The propeller GALENA, belonging to the New York Central line of steamers, arrived here at noon yesterday from Buffalo. Her commander, Capt. Penny, has placed us under obligations for a budget of highly interesting marine intelligence from Lake Huron and the Straits, which we append:
Capt. Penny reports that on Thursday last, 14th inst, the propeller PORTSMOUTH, bound down from Lake Superior with a cargo of ore, dragged her anchors and went ashore upon the northeast end of Middle Island, Lake Huron. When the GALENA passed, the seas were breaking over her in a wild manner., and it is feared she will prove a total loss. She lies upon a hard, stony bottom. The PORTSMOUTH is owned by the Erie Railway Company, and valued at $16,000. She was built at Buffalo in 1853, by Messrs. Bidwell & Banta, and is therefore fourteen years old. In 1861 she received large repairs. Her measurement is 525 tons old style. Vessel and cargo are in all probability insured.
The pier of Messrs. S. Pease & Co., at Pine River, Mich., was washed away the night of the 14th. A small coasting propeller called the SUNNYSIDE, owned by Messrs. Hannah, Lay & Co., of Traverse City, which was moored at the pier when it began to break up, was driven ashore and dashed to pieces. She had a full cargo of merchandise on board, all of which was lost. The SUNNYSIDE was worth in the neighborhood of $12,000.
Captain Penny met the wrecking tug LEVIATHAN at Mackinac with the schooner REPUBLIC, which she had taken from the beach at Mackinac Island. The vessel's cargo of wheat was being discharged upon the dock in a damaged condition, and when this work is finished, the LEVIATHAN will tow her to Milwaukee for repairs. Capt. Gonnio, of the LEVIATHAN, stated that the schooner ALBEMARLE will prove a total loss.
The schooner ESSEX was still on the reef at Point Waugoshance, and will prove a total loss. We erroneously stated yesterday that this vessel was upbound with wheat. We meant to write bound down.
      Detroit Free Press
      November 23, 1867


NOTE: PORTSMOUTH and ALBEMARLE became a total losses. SUNNYSIDE was recovered, only to be wrecked the following May. ESSEX was recovered and repaired at a cost of $4,000, almost her entire value. REPUBLIC was actually repaired at Detroit instead of Milwaukee.



      The fate of the schr. ALBEMARLE, as far as we can learn, may be considered as fully decided upon, and all efforts thus far having failed, there is little hope for her. A reliable tug was dispatched to her relief with steam pumps, but on arriving at the scene of the disaster nothing was attempted, the situation of the vessel being such as to preclude the idea of ever removing her from the spot where she lies. The ALBEMARLE came out new this season, was of the largest class, and one of the finest vessels that ever floated on the lakes. She
belonged to Messrs. Winslows, of Buffalo.
      Detroit Post
      November 26, 1867

      . . . . .

MARINE ITEMS. - The schooner ALBEMARLE proves a total loss.
      Erie Daily Dispatch
      Saturday, November 30, 1867

      . . . . .
     
      CARGO TO BE RECOVERED:- Efforts are being made to recover the cargo of the schooner ALBEMARLE, sunk at Mackinac. It consists of iron ore.
      Chicago Tribune
      Thursday, July 30, 1868

      . . . . .

      WRECKING AT MACKINAC:- Captain James Smith, who has in hand the undertaking for raising the schooner ALBEMARLE, in Mackinac Straits, has just reached Detroit from that point, and reports favorable progress. The vessel as many will remember, sprung a leak, last fall outside of the Straits, and sunk in the channel. She was from Escanaba, with a full cargo of iron ore, some 900 tons, which went down with her in deep water. After various efforts to raise her, by different parties, expert in such enterprises, she was finally abandoned as beyond possible recovery. Mr. Smith has with him, marine divers, and has already succeeded in recovering 300 tons of the ore, and is now on his return with steam pumps and other apparatus to raise her. The ALBEMARLE, as already stated, was a new craft, and of the largest class, as well as one of the finest vessels on the lakes.
      Chicago Tribune
      Thursday, August 20, 1868

      . . . . .

GONE TO MACKINAC. -- A number of steam pumps, with engineers, was on Monday evening shipped on board the MAGNET, from Detroit to Mackinac, for the purpose of raising the schooner ALBEMARLE, sunk at that point. Nearly all of her cargo has been recovered, and with the aid of pumps there will be no difficulty in bringing her to the surface and thence to a port for repairs.
      Chicago Tribune
      Friday, August 28, 1868

      . . . . .

      The Captain of the propeller MAYFLOWER, reports that when he came through the Straits on Sunday, the steam pumps brought up by the MAGNET for the purpose of raising the ALBEMARLE were all in active operation, and there was every prospect that she would be raised in a ver short time.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      September 3, 1868 3-4

      . . . . .

      The attemp to raise the schooner ALBEMARLE, sunk near the Straits of Mackinac, has been abandoned.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      September 5, 1868 3-4

      . . . . .

      THE ALBEMARLE PROBABLY A TOTAL LOSS:- The efforts to raise this vessel have again proved unsuccessful. The expedition to save her was one of the best appointed that could be imagined, including no fewer than six steam pumps; but she has been so strained that for every foot of water expelled a foot of sand was admitted. She lies 'humped up' on a reef amidships, with both ends hanging in deep water. If another effort is made to save her, it must necessarily be with chains.
      Chicago Tribune
      Monday, September 7, 1868


Schooner AKBEMARLE. U. S. No. 1730. Of 412.71 tons gross. Home port, Buffalo Creek.
      Merchant Vessel List, 1870
     
     
      Schooner ARBEMARLE. U. S. No. 1730. Of 412 tons gross. Built Buffalo, N.Y., 1867 by Mason & Bidwell. Noted as sunk 1867.
      Herman Runge Notes


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: nil
Hull damage: $9,000
Cargo: inc.
Freight: iron ore
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1867
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.14304
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Albemarle (Schooner), U1730, aground, 1 Nov 1867