The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
William H. Mack (Propeller), U81857, collision, 3 Oct 1905

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Detroit, Oct 4. - The big tug WINSLOW, owned by the Reid Wrecking Co., had her cabins and boilerhouse badly wrecked in a collision with the steamer W.H. MACK near the mouth of the Detroit River. The tug will be out of commission for the balance of the season.
      The WINSLOW was towing an oil barge when something went wrong with the MACK which was just ahead, causing the steamer to sheer towards the bank. As the tug started to pass astern, the MACK backed up and her fanrail raked the tug, nearly capsizing her. The oil barge then bumped into the steamer amidships, but without doing much injury. Temporary repairs were made to the WINSLOW at Amherstburg to enable her to return to Sarnia. The tug OTTAWA will take her place in towing the oil barge.
      Buffalo Evening News
      October 4, 1905

Steam screw WILLIAM HENRY MACK. U. S. No. 81857. Of 3,781 tons gross; 2,923 tons net. Built Cleveland, Ohio, 1903. Home port, Cleveland, Ohio. 354.0 x 48.0 x 28.0 Of 1,300 indicated horsepower. Crew of 21. Steel built. Passenger service.
      Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1909
      . . . . .

NOTE - The WINSLOW was built Cleveland in 1865 and became Canadian in 1903.

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Reason: collision
Lives: nil
Remarks: Uninjured ?
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  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 42.081944 Longitude: -83.125555
William R. McNeil
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William H. Mack (Propeller), U81857, collision, 3 Oct 1905