The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Sunrise (Schooner), U223449, sunk by collision, 22 May 1896


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Chicago, May 22 - The schr. SUNRISE was sunk by a collision with the whaleback barge No. 133 in tow of the steamer W.H. GRATWICK, in mid lake, about 6 miles from Chicago, early this morning. The crew of the lost schooner arrived here this morning on board the GRATWICK.
      According to the story of Capt. Buchanan, the SUNRISE was running free with a south wind, all light canvas being in, when 3 blasts of the steamer were heard from the fog. She passed the steamer all right, with nothing to indicate that she had a boat in tow. The next thing he knew, the whaleback barge had cut his boat clean off, 15 ft. back.
      The boat was immediately lowered and the 8 members of the crew succeeded in getting into it before the SUNRISE went down. Louis Brisay, the mate, was badly jammed between the yawl and the schooner. The tow-line had been parted by the collision and the sunrise crew was taken on board the whaleback. The GRATWICK did not discover that the barge had broken loose until she had gone 15 miles. She then returned, picked up her tow and took the crew of the SUNRISE aboard.
      The SUNRISE was owned by Henry Scheedle of Sheboygan and Capt. Buchanan. She was worth $8,000 and had no insurance. She was bound light to Cockburn Island.
      The crew of the whaleback say the SUNRISE struck the tow-line before coming into the barge. It is certain an attempt to hold the barge liable for the loss will be made. She is insured abroad, with collision liability covered.
      Whaleback barge No. 133 was taken to the dry-dock at South Chicago for an examination and repairs. Three of her plates in the port bow had been jammed in, but further than that, there was apparently no damage done.
      Detroit Tribune
      May 23, 1896

      . . . . .
     
      Chicago, May 22 - The schr. SUNRISE was sunk by a collision with the whaleback 133 in tow of the stm. W.H. GRATWICK (wood) in midlake about 60 miles from Chicago, early yesterday morning. The crew of the lost schooner arrived here this morning on board the GRATWICK. According to the story of Capt. Buchanan, the SUNRISE was running free with a south wind, all light canvas being in, when the 3 blasts of the steamer were heard in the fog. She passed the steamer all right with nothing to indicate that she had a boat in tow. The next thing he knew the whaleback had cut his bow clean off 15 ft. back. The yawl boat was immediately lowered. The 8 members of the crew succeeded in getting into it before the SUNRISE went down. Louis Brosay, the mate, was badly jammed between the yawl and the schooner. The towline was parted by the collision and the Sunrise's crew was taken on board the whaleback. The GRATWICK did not discover that the barge had broken loose until she had gone 15 miles. She then returned, picked up her tow and took the crew of the SUNRISE aboard. The SUNRISE was owned by Henry Scheele of Sheboygan and Capt. Buchanan, was worth $8,000 and had no insurance. Capt. Buchanan lost $98 in money, which was in the cabin. The lost schooner was bound light to Cockburn Island.
The whaleback is not damaged much. There is a break on the starboard bow above the waterline, and that is all. Her crew claims that the SUNRISE struck the tow line before coming into the barge. It is certain that an attempt to hold the barge liable for the loss will be made. She was insured abroad, with collision liability covered.
Whaleback barge 133 was taken to the dry-dock at South Chicago yesterday afternoon for examination and repairs. Examination showed that of her plate on the port bow had been jammed in, but further than this there was apparently no harm done.
      Buffalo Morning Express
      May 23, 1896 3-1


The case of Henry Scheele, Jr., as owner of the schooner SUNRISE, against the steamer WILLIAM H. GRATWICK and whaleback barge 133, in tow of the GRATWICK, for the sinking of the SUNRISE by collision with the 133 on Lake Michigan, May 21, 1896, was decided by Judge Grosscup on June 1. The GRATWICK was exonerated; the 133 was held at fault for not having an efficient bell, and the SUNRISE for not altering her course. Several interesting questions, as to the duty of a steamer with tow in fog, the location of bell, etc., were considered, but as the full text of the opinion is not at hand the determination of these questions can not be given.
      The Marine Review
      June 3, 1897


Sheboygan, Wis., June 3. -- The sinking of the Sheboyan schooner SUNRISE in midlake a week ago by a collision with the McDougall pig 133, is likely to cause considerable condemnation among mariners and ship owners towards the law-makers at Washington. The sinking of the SUNRISE is due more to a defective law than any one other reason, and it will not be surprising if the government should hear from the owners of the SUNRISE: In other words, the government may be held responsible for the loss of the vessel. Years ago there was a law in effect that compelled vessels having tows to give three blasts to warn other vessels of the existence of the tow, single vessels only giving one blast. This law worked with perfect success. Then someone had the law changed to compel all vessels to give three blasts. The result is well exemplified in the SUNRISE collision.
      Evening Wisconsin
      June 4, 1896
     

Schooner SUNRISE. U. S. No. 223449. Of 429.33 tons gross; 417.37 tons net. Built Cleveland, O., 1862. Home port, Chicago, Ill.
      Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1884
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk by collision
Lives: nil
Freight: nil
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1896
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.15129
Language of Item:
English
  • Michigan, United States
    Latitude: 43.68473 Longitude: -86.53036
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Sunrise (Schooner), U223449, sunk by collision, 22 May 1896