The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Tanner (Bark), aground, 9 Sep 1875


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Milwaukee, Sept. 10. -- During the gale last night the barque TANNER attempted to make the port in charge of a tug, but the tow line parted, and the vessel drifted southward of the pier, and at an early hour this morning she sank. The crew were rescued, but Captain Howard, in attempting to swim ashore, was drowned.
      Toronto Daily Globe
      Saturday, September 11, 1875
     


      The Milwaukee News says: The bark TANNER, which sunk just south of the pier is fast going to pieces, and aside from the rigging and masts is already so. The stern was at first smashed in, the cabin carried away, the rear mast fell over, and then the whole structure became splintered and broken. The ship was insured for $12,000 and the cargo for $35,000. About $1,500 worth of rigging will be saved from the vessel, and the wheat, cleanly washed and much swollen from being in the water, is fast disappearing in row boats, scows, etc.,
everybody aiding who has any use for soaked wheat. It is taken from the beach, and also from the hold of the vessel.
      Detroit Free Press
      September 17, 1875



The September Gale.-- On Thursday and Friday of last week a terrible gale raged on the lakes, causing many disasters Besides the loss of the EQUINOX many other vessels were wrecked or damaged. The schooner JOHN DUNN went ashore at Chicago Friday night and will prove a total loss. She was built last season at a cost of $23,600 and was insured for $12,000. The schooner MAJOR FERRY and scow-schooner M.J. GAINES also went ashore at the same time and place. The bark TANNER sank off Milwaukee, her master, Capt. Howard, being drowned. The schooner ONEONTA was driven into the north pier at Chicago Friday night, her master, Capt. Sam Bean, being drowned. The bark CITY OF BUFFALO, ore laden, while passing through the St. Mary's River struck a rock and began leaking. Upon her arrival at Sand Beach, Lake Huron, there was six feet of water in her hold. The vessel was beached and sunk in sixteen feet of water. The crew was saved The scow THOMAS RICHARDS of Detroit is on the beach near Port Hope, Lake Huron. Her crew were saved. The tug RESCUE was unable to tow the schooner FAREWELL through and beached her near Marine City in the St. Clair River, where her grain will be transferred. The tug MAYFLOWER with six barges in tow was caught in the severe gale opposite Port Austin and cut loose all of her tow but two, the EDWARD KEAN and the SPAULDING. Three of those cast adrift dropped anchors but dragged them, owing to the violence of the gale, and drifted on to the Port Austin reef. The SOPHIA SMITH, being light, went on broadside against the rocky shore and her crew without much difficulty stepped off on the land. The crews of the barges on the Port Austin reef were taken off by shore boats. Numerous other reports of lost deck loads, serious leaks and carrying away of sails and rigging of vessels on Lake Michigan were received and the general opinion expressed was that the storm of Thursday and Friday and its effects is the most serious that has taken place on the lakes for many years.
      Amherstburg Echo
      September 17, 1875


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: 1
Freight: grain
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1875
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.15428
Language of Item:
English
  • Wisconsin, United States
    Latitude: 43.0389 Longitude: -87.90647
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Tanner (Bark), aground, 9 Sep 1875