The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Dundee (Schooner), U157366, sunk, 13 Sep 1900


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STEAMER JOHN B. LYON FOUNDERS AND 14 OF THE CREW PERISH.
      Cleveland, Sept. 12. -- The tail end of the west Indian Hurricane, which swept over lake Erie last night, proves to have been the most disastrous storm that has visited this section in several years. The winds at one time attained a velocity of 60 miles an hour, and it was then blowing directly from the west, having practically a clear sweep of the whole lake. Dispatches tonight begin to tell of the shipping disasters that resulted from the gale. At least two vessels were sunk, carrying down with them several persons, and a number of vessels have reached port in a badly demolished condition.
      The JOHN B. LYON, a 255 foot steamer, owned by J. C. Gilchrist of this city, foundered about five miles off Conneaut, O., and all but two of her crew of 16 were lost. The schooner DUNDEE sank about fifteen miles off this port, and the cook, a woman, was drowned, the master and crew escaping on a raft.
      The steamer CITY OF ERIE, with 300 passengers aboard, left Buffalo at 7 o'clock last evening. A moderate wind was blowing at the time. When off the port of Conneaut the steamer was struck by a terrific westerly gale that had begun blowing. She encountered a tidal wave which went clear over the bulwarks, smashing some of the upper works. The engine was slowed down and the steamer headed for the Canadian shore for safety. She arrived here at 4 o'clock this afternoon, 10 hours late, with all her passengers safe.
      The steamer MAGIC left this port Tuesday evening, but was unable to buffet the sea. She was badly battered, but a tug finally brought her back to port.
      The steamer CORNELL, light, left last evening for Fairport, to pick up her consort, the schooner BRYN MAWR, which had dragged her anchor and drifted eight miles down the lake. The CORNELL finally succeeded in picking up the BRYN MAWR, but the sea knocked off her smokestack and damaged her otherwise.
      The steamer IROQUOIS ashore near this city, but was taken off by a tug.
      The tug MORGAN, bound down the lake with a Standard Oil barge in tow, encountered the steamer ROBERT RHODES in distress, making for shelter behind Pelee Island. The RHODES had been badly battered and most of her bulwarks were gone.
      The steamer LYON, which was sunk off Conneaut, was valued at $60,000. The names of the crew, only two of whom were said to have escaped, are : Capt. A. H. Fenghas, master; L. Carlson, first mate; G. Taylor, second mate; Charles Willows, chief engineer; B. Brown, second engineer; G. Laskiel, cook; Mrs. Laskiel, second cook; J. Spencer and W. Smith, firemen; F. King and M. Nestor, watchmen; W. Brand and P. Bishop, wheelmen; M. Robinson; C. Glover and C, J Vanasky, deck hands.
      Saginaw Courier-Herald
      September 13, 1900

      . . . . .

      CONSORT DUNDEE LOST.
      FOUNDERED YESTERDAY 11 MILES WEST OF CLEVELAND, WITH ONE LIFE.
      Cleveland, Sept. 12. -- At least two Cleveland vessels were lost in Tuesday night's gale. The schooner DUNDEE, owned by the Minch Transit Company, in tow of the steamer JOHN N. GLIDDEN, foundered about 11 miles west of this port at an early hour this morning.
      The boats were bound for Ashtabula with ore, and the storm struck them about 8 o'clock this morning, shortly after they passed the "dummy". The DUNDEE lost her rudder, and a large sea boarded her and carried away her forward hatch. The crew all took to the rigging with the exception of Kate Hoffman, the cook, who was drowned. The men were in the rigging for about half an hour before the boat foundered, and were picked up by the steamer C. TOWER Jr., of the Wilson fleet, which started for Cleveland with them, but put them aboard the tug ALVA D.
      The cook lived in Milan, O. Capt. Martin Elnen, the master of the DUNDEE, who lives at Milan, is in bad shape, and had to be put to bed at the life-saving station. The other members of the crew are first mate Albert Johnson, of Chicago, and seaman Charles Anderson, and Chris Olson of Chicago. Harry Sym of Rochester and John Hedburg, of providence. The men lost nearly all their clothing and the crew of the TOWER had to furnish most of items.
The GLIDDEN, which had the DUNDEE in tow, put in here about 6 o'clock tonight.
      The wooden schooner DUNDEE was built at West bay City by James Davidson seven years ago, was of 1,043 gross tons 211 feet long, 35 feet beam and 17 feet deep, rated A 1 star, and is insured for the greater part of her value with Smith, Davis & Co., of Buffalo.
      Detroit Free Press
      September 13, 1900

      . . . . .

      Cleveland, Sept. 13 - Capt. E. Elnen of the lost schr. DUNDEE was removed from the Life Saving Station to St. Joseph's Hospital today. He is very ill and needs the best of care. Capt. Motley, of the Lifesaving crew went out to the DUNDEE wreck today. The spars were found sticking out of the water 17 miles northwest of Cleveland. Capt. Gerlach, manager of the Minch fleet, will send a diver tomorrow to search for the body of the lost cook, Kate Hoffman.
      Also
Chicago, Sept. 13 - The lost schr. DUNDEE was insured for $4,000 divided generally between the lake companies through Smith, Davis & Co. of Buffalo. The cargo of iron ore aboard the DUNDEE was insured by the Atlantic Mutual.
      Buffalo Morning Express
      September 14, 1900 8-1

      . . . . .

      The wreck of the schooner DUNDEE has been found 17 miles northwest of Cleveland. Capt. Elnen is very ill from exposure. The DUNDEE was insured for $40,000, divided generally between lake companies, through Smith, Davis & Co., of Buffalo. The cargo of iron ore aboard the DUNDEE was insured by the Atlantic Mutual.
      Saginaw Courier-Herald
      September 15, 1900
     
      . . . . .
     
      It is reported from Detroit that no effort will be made to raise the steamer JOHM B. LYON, which foundered a week ago in lake Erie. She lies in about 60 feet of water, five miles off shore, midway between Ashtabula and Conneaut. From the accounts of the disaster it appears that the vessel is so badly wrecked that it will not pay to raise her.
      The schooner DUNDEE, which also went down in the big gale last week, will be raised and repaired. The DUNDEE is owned by Mr. Gerlach of cleveland, and as she only came out seven years ago, it is figured is too good a boat to leave at the bottom of the lake. It is said that she may be abandoned to the insurance companies as a constructive total loss, or else the insurance will be claimed and Capt. Gerlach will raise her.
      Chicago Tribune
      September 19, 1900

      . . . . .

It is reported from Detroit that no effort will be made to raise the steamer JOHM B. LYON, which foundered a week ago in lake Erie. She lies in about 60 feet of water, five miles off shore, midway between Ashtabula and Conneaut. From the accounts of the disaster it appears that the vessel is so badly wrecked that it will not pay to raise her.
      The schooner DUNDEE, which also went down in the big gale last week, will be raised and repaired. The DUNDEE is owned by Mr. Gerlach of cleveland, and as she only came out seven years ago, it is figured is too good a boat to leave at the bottom of the lake. It is said that she may be abandoned to the insurance companies as a constructive total loss, or else the insurance will be claimed and Capt. Gerlach will raise her.
      Chicago Tribune
      September 19, 1900

      . . . . .
     
     
      Cleveland, Sept. 20. -- The wreck of the schooner DUNDEE, which foundered in Lake Erie during the recent big blow, has been abandoned to the underwriters by Capt. William Gerlach.
      Detroit Free Press
      September 21, 1900


      The government survey steamer VISITOR on Friday proceeded up to the spot where the barge DUNDEE lies sunk off Cleveland. The engineers noted the condition and her location and estimated the cost of removing her. As a result of the investigation the government authorities will issue notices to the owners that the wreck must be removed or they will take steps to do that work themselves.
      Detroit Free Press
      October 9, 1900
     
     
      Schooner DUNDEE. U. S. No. 157366. Of 1,043 gross tons; 991 tons net. Built West Bay City, Mich., 1893. Home port, Cleveland, Ohio. 211.0 x 35.0 x 16.5
      Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1900
     
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk
Lives: 1 ?
Freight: iron ore
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1900
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.15481
Language of Item:
English
  • Ohio, United States
    Latitude: 41.4995 Longitude: -81.69541
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Dundee (Schooner), U157366, sunk, 13 Sep 1900