The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Forest Queen (Barge), aground, 8 Nov 1872


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The stmb. BURLINGTON which was coming down with the barges KENTUCKY, NORTH STAR and FOREST QUEEN, all laden with lumber from Saginaw, in tow, was forced to cut loose from them off Pt. Abino, last night, and leave them to their fate. This morning the tug GARDNERwas sent out after them, but had not returned at last account
      One of the barges, the KENTUCKY, was to be seen at anchor out in the bay at 11:00 this morning. As the gale has abated it is expected that all 3 will be brought in without damage or loss of cargo.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      November 8, 1872 3-1

      . . . . .

      The only disaster of magnitude befell a tow of lumber barges, which class of craft seem to have been very unfortunate during the past season, the victim in this instance being the steambarge BURLINGTON, with barges KENTUCKY, STAR OF THE NORTH and FOREST QUEEN, all loaded with lumber and bound from Bay City to Buffalo. The barges
were caught in the storm near Gravelly Bay, and the captain of the BURLINGTON endeavored to take his tow into harbor but was unsuccessful, and was obliged to head for Buffalo. Between Gravelly Bay and Pt. Abino the tow lines of the kentucky and the STAR OF THE NORTH parted. The storm was so violent that any attempt to secure the barges would have been useless, and the BURLINGTON and FOREST QUEEN kept on alone.
      Off Pt. Abino the line connecting the barges parted and since that time nothing has been heard or seen of the ill-fated FOREST QUEEN. The STAR OF THE NORTH drifted about at the mercy of the waves for a few hours and finally anchored near Pt. Abino. The
KENTUCKY anchored about 4 miles up the bay. The BURLINGTON arrived safely, and upon the news of the disaster being received the tug GARDNER was sent in pursuit of the missing craft. The STAR OF THE NORTH was brought into port yesterday morning, and
the crew of the KENTUCKY, which was waterlogged, were taken from their uncomfortable quarters. The barge itself was afterwards towed in near the new breakwater, where it will remain at anchor until the water becomes calm.
      The FOREST QUEEN had a crew of 7 men, and as nothing had been heard of either vessel or crew at a late hour yesterday, it is feared that their names must be added to the already long list of sprays which swept over the frail planks would be enought to weaken even the strongest and most hardy, and ere this the treacherous waters of Lake Erie have doubtless enshrouded and entombed the remains of the 7 unfortunate mariners.
      Buffalo Morning Express
      November 9, 1872 1-3

      . . . . .

It appears that the FOREST QUEEN was the last to break loose from the BURLINGTON. The NORTH STAR and KENTUCKY was lost off Gravelly Bay and the FOREST QUEEN held on until opposite Pt. Abino, when the line parted, since which nothing has been seen or heard from, which in any way throws light upon the fate of the barge or crew. The crew rescued from the waterlogged KENTUCKY reports passing some person on a wreck who hailed them and called for help. The FOREST QUEEN was owned by C.C. Blodgett of Detroit. Her cargo consisted of 20,000 staves for A.A. Gillespie and 900 hoops for Toles & Sweet.
Later - Hoops, staves and pieces of the cabin have been found 2 miles up the south shore this morning.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      November 9, 1872 3-6

      . . . . .

Detached pieces of the wrecked barge FOREST QUEEN came ashore yesterday; also a large quantity of the cargo, but the bodies of the captain and crew have not yet been recovered.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      November 11, 1872 3-3

      . . . . .

Buffalo, Nov. 9 - The barge FOREST QUEEN, bound from Bay City of Buffalo, was wrecked a few miles from here yesterday. The crew consisting of 3 men and a female cook, were all lost.
      The Toronto Mail
      Monday, November 11, 1872

      . . . . .

Nothing has yet been discovered of the crew of the wrecked barge FOREST QUEEN. Her commander was Capt. Wm. Walker of Detroit; Wm. Steva was mate, and a citizen of this state; J.A. Straub, a seaman, was a resident of this city; Alfred Oldfield, a seaman, residence unknown; Ufarg Rosa, mulatto cook, resident of Detroit.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      November 14, 1872 3-5



Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: 4
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1872
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.16021
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • New York, United States
    Latitude: 42.88645 Longitude: -78.87837
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Forest Queen (Barge), aground, 8 Nov 1872