The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Mary McVea (Schooner), U90179, aground, 8 Oct 1878


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LOSS OF THE MARY McVEA.
      She Goes On The Rocks At Walker's Point, Manitoulin Island.
      Private dispatches were received here on Saturday by Mr. Jacobson, on of the owners, and by Captain Ed Van Dalson, of the Union Towing Association, from Captain Edward Mullin, of the vessel, to the effect that the schooner MARY McVEA, laden with oats and pork, has gone ashore at Walker's Point, Manitoulin Island, and, with her cargo, would prove a total loss. The McVEA left here on Saturday, the 5th. The oats (12,255 bushels) were consigned to parties at Collingwood, and the port (120 barrels) to parties at some other place near by. The oats were insured in the Phoenix for $3,000. Whether the port was insured or not is not known. The cargo was shipped by C.J. Magill. The vessel was the property of Jacobson & McVea and was valued at $8,000, but only partly insured, the companies being the North-Western, National of Milwaukee, and the St. Paul Fire and Marine.
      On the strength of Captain Mullin's dispatch, the vessel has been abandoned to the Underwriters, who make some effort to save her. Captain Mullin says: "Ashore in bad condition; canvas all gone. Abandon her." The McVEA was a staunchly built, money making little schooner of 208 tons. She came out in 1870, and classed B 1.
      People in marine circles sympathize with Captain Mullin in his bad luck, and with Messrs. Jacobson & McVea on the loss of their fine little vessel.
      Collingwood, Ont., Oct. 12. -- Capt. Mullin, of the schooner MARY McVEA, of Chicago, arrived here by the steamer NORTHERN BELLE, and reports his vessel caught in a heavy squall on the night of the 8th, on Lake Huron, off Walker's Point, Manitoulin Island, losing her mainsail, foresail, and jibboom, leaving the vessel helpless. She drifted towards shore until 4 a. m. of the 9th, when the anchors were dropped. At 6 a. m. another severe squall, came from the westward; she dragged anchors and drifted on the rocks, and it is feared that, before assistance can reach the vessel, she will be a total loss. The cargo consisted of 12,000 bu of grain and 120 brls. of pork. The crew were saved.
      Chicago Inter Ocean
      Monday, October 14, 1878

      . . . . .

LOSS OF THE MARY McVEA. - One week ago today, the schooner MARY McVEA went ashore on Walker's Point, Manitoulin Island, and is a total loss. She was owned by Messrs. Jacobson & McVea, of Chicago, classed B 1, was of 208 tons register. Her cargo consisted of 12,255 bushels of oats and 120 barrels of pork, consigned to parties in Collingwood. The oats are insured in the Phoenix. The hull is partly insured, the companies being the National, of Milwaukee; St. Paul Fire & Marine, and the Northwestern. The crew were saved. The schooner was commanded by Captain Edward Mullen.
      Detroit Post & Tribune
      Tuesday, October 15, 1878

      . . . . .

      THE MARY McVEA. - Chicago Tribune, yesterday: "It is probable that the fine little schooner MARY McVEA, on the rocks at Walker's Point, Manitoulin Island, Lake Huron, is by this time beyond recovery. The Phoenix Insurance Company, which has $3,000 on the oats on board, would go in with the others in interest to send an expedition to the vessel, but as the Northwestern, National and St. Paul Fire & Marine, the companies on the hull, refuse to share the expense, it is not likely that anything will be done. The barreled pork on board, which is not perishable, is worth $1,000, and is the property of Armour & Co., of Chicago, who ought also to go in. Captain Mullen remains at the scene of the disaster for the present, to look after the interest of the vessel and cargo, but without a powerful tug of course he can do little or nothing, and, as we say, the vessel and most of her cargo have probably gone to destruction before his eyes."
      Detroit Post & Tribune
      Thursday, October 17, 1878

      . . . . .

THEY WONT SAVE HER. - The underwriters have concluded not to send an expedition to the schooner MARY McVEA, wrecked on Manitoulin Island. The principal reason for this conclusion is that there are no Canadian tugs in the vicinity to work on the schooner, and that American boats would not be permitted by the Canuck authorities to wreck in their waters. Capt. Edward Mullen, who is still at the scene, has been instructed to do what he can for the interests of all concerned in the matter of saving the outfit of the unfortunate craft, and then return to Chicago at as early a day as possible. From this it would appear that if the McVEA is not already a total wreck she soon will be, thanks to the miserable selfishness of the Canadian authorities.
      Detroit Post & Tribune
      Saturday, October 19, 1878

      . . . . .

THE Collingwood Bulletin publishes the following item, copied from an American paper "The underwriters have concluded not to send an expedition to the schooner McVEA wrecked on Manitoulin Island, The principal reason for this conclusion is that there are no Canadian tugs in the vicinity to work on the schooner. And that American boats would not be permitted by the Cannck authorities to wreck in their waters. Captain Edward Mullins, who is still on the scene, has instructed to do what he can for the interest of all concerned in the matter of saving the outfit of the unfortunate craft, and then return to Chicago as early a day as possible. From this it would appear that if the McVEA is not already a total wreck she soon will be, thanks to the Canadian authorities" The truth of the matter is as shown by a correspondent of the Mail, that there were Canadian tugs at Windsor, Collingwood, and Sarnia, all available but none called on to go to the assistance of the wrecked vessel. It is a fact that the Canadian Government will not allow Yankee tugs to do wrecking in Canadian waters, just as the United States Government refuses to allow Canadian tugs to do wrecking in American waters, This being the case our neighbours have decided to let the vrecked McVEA go to pieces rather than give a job to a Canadian tug. They can do so if they like it but it does not follow that they need to misrepresent the state of affairs .
      Barrie Northern Advance
      October 31, 1878



      If the vessels hold out, that cargo of supplies for Parry Sound will reach there yet this fall. It was shipped first on the MARY McVEA and was lost with her. It was duplicated on the J. G. WORTS and lost with that vessel, and now the GEORGE L. WRENN will try her luck in delivering it. This is the third time the order has been filled and the supplies shipped - oats, pork, lard, etc. Good luck to the WRENN.
      Chicago Inter-Ocean
      Wednesday, November 6, 1878
     
     

NAME: MARY MCVEA
RIG: Schooner
OFFICIAL NO: 90179
SIGNAL LETTERS:
LOA:
BEAM:
DEPTH:
GROSS: 208.16 (1870; 1871; 1872; 1873; 1875; 1876; 1877; 1878; 1879)
NET:
YEAR BUILT:
STATE:
CITY:
HOME PORT: Saugatuck, MI (1870; 1871; 1872; 1873); Chicago, IL (1875; 1876); Grand Haven, MI (1877;
1878; 1879)
YEARS LISTED: 1870; 1871; 1872; 1873; 1875; 1876; 1877; 1878; 1879.
NOTES:


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: nil
Freight: oats, pork
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1878
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.16213
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Mary McVea (Schooner), U90179, aground, 8 Oct 1878