The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
J. P. Ward (Schooner), capsized, 3 Sep 1878


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DISASTER TO THE "J.P.WARD."
      Captain Thomas Richardson, of the schooner J.P. WARD, with his crew, arrived in Chicago yesterday and reports the vessel lost off Little Point Sauble. The WARD left Pierport, a short distance from Manistee, on Monday night, with a cargo of water-elm lumber for William Ripley of Chicago. Tuesday night she sprang a bad leak, and, notwithstanding the greatest efforts of the crew at the pumps, soon filled and rolled over. The crew saved themselves by taking to the small boat. They pulled eighteen miles to Stoney Creek, and from there went to White Lake, where the Captain obtained a tug to go in search, hoping that she had not sunk but might be drifting about. She could not be found however, and several vessels which must have passed in her tracks were spoken, but none had seen anything of her. That the entire crew, including the female cook, escaped with their lives, may be regarded as very fortunate.
Captain Richardson was the owner of the vessel, and having no insurance, is a total loser. She was well advanced in years, but was considered a good little vessel, as she had been pretty well kept up. She was formerly a side-wheel steamboat, and, after being burned at Saginaw several years ago, was rebuilt and transformed into a schooner. Her tonnage was 112, and she was valued at about $2,000.
      The cargo was worth $1,000, and was the property of the Hopkins Manufacturing Company, of Bear Lake, who are the losers on it, as it also wavessel twenty uninsured. Mr. Ripley loses nothing except his prospective commission on the sale of the cargo.
      (LATER)
      Sheboygan, Wis., Sept. 5-- Captain Gunderson, of the schooner ISLAND CITY, reports finding the schooner UPWARD (doutless J.P. WARD) of Milwaukee, waterlogged, spars broken off, and deserted yesterday afternoon, about ten miles off White Lake. He sent his boat to the wreck and recovered a live dog, which he thought to be a man when first seen. Vessel was loaded with lumber. It is supposed the crew escaped with the small boat, as that was gone.
      Chicago Inter Ocean
      Friday, September 6, 1878

      . . . . .

      THE CAPSIZED SCHOONER WARD.
      The following special to the Inter Ocean was received yesterday:
      Muskegon, Mich. Sept. 6. -- About 12 o'clock last night the tug J. TORRENT, Captain Pelow, found the schooner C. NORTH about ten miles off Muskegon, having in tow the water-logged schooner J. P. WARD, of Chicago. Captain Pelow reports that the NORTH found the abandoned vessel twenty miles off Muskegon on the 3d, and had hung on to her until she fell in with the tug. Both masts have been carried away, and were dragging by the rigging; the bulwarks were stove in, and the top of the cabin had floated off. The small boat was gone. Hold full of lumber. The WARD loaded at Duck Lake for Kenosha. Nothing has been heard of the crew.
      The Inter Ocean's Sheboygan dispatch, printed yesterday, was the first the news the Captain and owner of the WARD had that the vessel was still afloat and could be recovered. When the captain arrived here with his crew he had given up all hope. Her cargo being water elm, very heavy stuff, he was positive, after the search he had made for her, that she had gone down.
      A dispatch received in Chicago yesterday from Milwaukee said: "The WARD is found. She is on the way here in tow of a steamer." The dispatch was received by William Ripley, the well-known lumberman, to whom the cargo is consigned.
      Captain Richardson has left for Milwaukee, and will meet the vessel there. Whether there will be a claim for salvage remains to be seen.
      Chicago Inter Ocean
      Saturday, September 7, 1878
     

      . . . . .

      DISASTER TO THE J. P. WARD
From the Inter-Ocean of Friday: Capt. Thomas Richardson, of the schooner J. P. Ward, with his crew, arrived in Chicago yesterday and reported the vessel lost off Little Point Sauble. The Ward left Pierport, a short distance from Manistee, on Monday night, with a cargo of water-elm for William Ripley, of Chicago. Tuesday night she sprung a bad leak, and, notwithstanding the greatest efforts of the crew at the pumps, soon filled and rolled over. The crew saved themselves by taking to the small boat. They pulled eighteen miles to Stoney Creek, and from there wen to White Lake, where the captain obtained a tug to go in search, hoping she had not sunk, but might be drifting about. She could not be found, however, and several vessels which must have passed in her track were spoken, but none had seen anything of her. That the entire crew, including the female cook, escaped with their lives, may be regarded as very fortunate. Capt. Richardson was the owner of the vessel, and having no insurance, is a total loser. She was well advanced in years, but was considered a good little vessel, as she had been pretty well kept up. She was formerly a sidewheel steamboat, and after being burned at Saginaw some years ago, was rebuilt and transformed into a schooner. Her tonnage was 112, and she was valued at about $2,000. The cargo was worth $1,000, and was the property of the Hopkins Manufacturing Company, of Bear Lake, who are the losers on it, as it also was uninsured. Mr. Ripley loses nothing except his prospective commission on the sale of the cargo.
Later. - Capt. Gunderson, of the schooner Island City, reports at Cheboygan finding the schooner Upward (doubtless J. P. Ward), of Milwaukee, waterlogged, spars broken off, and deserted, yesterday afternoon, about ten miles off White Lake. He sent his boat to the wreck and recovered a live dog, which he thought to be a man when first seen. Vessel was loaded with lumber. It is supposed the crew escaped with the small boat, as it is gone.
      Detroit Free Press
      Saturday, September 7, 1878
[ This little boat had a colorful history. She was built at Detroit by J. L. Wolverton in 1857 as a sidewheel tug and was in use as a boom tug on the Saginaw River until she caught fire in July of 1865. She was raised and converted to a schooner (US#12791) locally, at a total cost of $40,000.
She was towed to Saugatuck after the accident above and her hull was was used by Brittain to build a passenger propeller named J. S. SEAVERNS (US#76152), being launched anew in 1880. The SEAVERNS was sold Canadian in 1884 and was owned on Lake Superior when she backed onto a reef in Michipicoten Harbor in May of the same year. She foundered after being pulled free, a total loss. ] Dave Swayze note.






      Inside Muskegon Lake, the schooner J.P. WARD lies in the sand full of water, where she was run on to prevent her sinking in deep water.
      Chicago Inter Ocean
      Wednesday, October 16, 1878

      . . . . .

Brevities. - The Scow FLORA is ashore at Grand Haven, and has been abandoned. It is thought that the schooner TEMPEST, ashore at Muskegon, will be saved. At the same port the schooner J.P. WARD lies in the sand and full of water.
      The schooner WILLIAM BATES, ashore near Holland, will prove a total loss.
      Detroit Post & Tribune
      Thursday, October 17, 1878

      . . . . .

      A BRUTAL ASSAULT.
      A short time ago, when captain Tom Richardson's schooner, the J. P. WARD, capsized and had to be abandoned by the crew (to save their lives,) the schooner C. NORTH came along, took the capsized vessel in tow, and held on to her until near Muskegon, when a tug was employed to take her inside, where she was beached. Captain Richardson asked the captain of the NORTH to let him regain the WARD and he would pay the NORTH's bill as he could. This the NORTH man refused to do, and tied the WARD up for salvage and put a custodian aboard, who still has charge. On Saturday Captain Richardson met the captain of the NORTH on the Lumber Market, and made a fierce assualt upon him, knocking him down, and bruising his face badly. A warrent was taken out for Richardson and he was arrested but gave bail.
      The captain of the NORTH can have him fined on a charge of disorderly; can then arrest him for inciting a riot and can then sue for damages. And if he had shot Richardson dead, the coroner's jury would not have held him an instant. Captain Richardson's friends sympathize with him in his loss of the WARD, but they do not think 'mashing" people is the proper course to persue. Richardson is now sailing the scow MILTON.
      Chicago Inter Ocean
      Monday, October 21, 1878
     
     


NOTE: The J.P. WARD was dropped from the 1879 Underwriters Register.




Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: capsized
Lives: nil
Freight: lumber
Remarks: Recovered
Date of Original:
1878
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.16216
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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J. P. Ward (Schooner), capsized, 3 Sep 1878