The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
J. G. McGrath (Schooner), sunk, 28 Oct 1878


Description
Full Text

A dispatch to Capt. E.P. Dorr from Port Colborne states that the schr. J.G. McGRATH, bound from Pt. au Pelee to St. Cathrines with stone foundered off Long Pt. Sunday (10/27) morning, and the crew arrived at Port Colborne safe yesterday afternoon, having pulled 40 miles in a small boat. Capt. James W. Murray of the prop. ARAXES, which arrived in port yesterday reports the McGRATH going down 20 miles above Dunkirk, and he supposed with all hands. Capt. Murray says he tried to get near her to render assistance, but the angry waves prevented his turning about. He thinks the vessel lost her rudder for she did not appear to be steered in any manner, drifting continually to the leeward. He saw 3 heavy billows strike her in quick succession each causing her to careen and shift her cargo. Suddenly she made a plunge and went down foremost. The ARAXES put about to save the crew, but could not find any trace of them, and accordingly came to Buffalo.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      October 29, 1878 3-4

      . . . . .

Port Colborne, Oct. 28 - The schr. J.G. McGRATH bound from Pt. Pelee to St. Catharines with stone, sprung a leak last night and foundered this morning off Long Pt. The crew took to the small boat, and after a 40 mile pull were picked up by one of the harbor tugs about 1/2 a mile off the harbor. The crew were about done in and could not have lasted much longer. Capt. McAuley of the McGRATH condemns the conduct of the captain of the prop. ARAXES which was in close hailing distance and made no effort to the cries of the wrecked crew, nor render them any assistance.
The McGRATH went down in full view of the propeller and even then not the slightest effort was made to pick up the crew. The sea was running very high at the time and there was scarcely a possibility that the small boat into which the crew managed to get, could weather the storm, but with perfect indiference the propeller went away allowing the suffering crew to be exposed to death. Fortunately, the small boat did weather the storm and the crew arrived this afternoon being exposed condition about 10 hours and rowing 40 miles.
      Chicago Inter Ocean
      October 29, 1878
     
      . . . . .

      DISASTERS. -- As shown by our dispatches printed yesterday and this morning, there have been numerous additional disasters within a few days, and the probabilities are that more that have already occurred are yet to be learned of. Besides these new disasters, it is ascertained that the numerous vessels, stranded on the east shore of this lake, and below, for some time past, are faring very badly, and will prove total losses. Among those are the schooners CORAL, MARY, W. BATES, FLORA, etc., etc.
      The schooner J. G. McGRATH, which foundered on Monday morning, is in deep water, and wholly beyond recovery. The schooner M. C. CAMERON, unless another storm catches her, can be recovered. The scow FAITH has gone to pieces. The prospect for rescuing the steambarge JACQUES CARTIER and tug HI SMITH, are not at all encouraging. The H. D. MOORE and other craft just stranded on the east shore of this lake may be recovered if operations are immediately commenced to that end. The SLIGO recently ashore on St. Helena, is not badly damaged.
      Chicago Inter Ocean
      Wednesday, October 30, 1878
     
      . . . . .

Capt. McAulye of the schr. McGRATH condemned the conduct of the captain of the ARAXES....
It will be remembered that Capt. Murray said he turned back, but could find no trace of the crew, and he believed they went down with the vessel. Capt. Murray has the reputation of being a competent and brave navigator, and hardly seems possible that he could have failed to make some effort to save the crew of the McGRATH.
      Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
      October 30, 1878 3-4

      . . . . .

The schr. J.G. McGRATH, which sunk off Dunkirk Monday, was owned by Mr. H.C. Dunlap of St. Cathrines, Ont. and was rated A2. She was valued at $5,000 and was 250 tons burthen. There were 8 men aboard when she went down, captain, 2 mates, cook and 4 sailors.
      Buffalo Morning Express
      October 30, 1878 4-7

      . . . . .

The schooner reported as going down near Dunkirk on Monday morning (10/28) proved to be the J.G. McGRATH, bound from Pt. au Pelee to St. Cathrines with a load of stone. A rumor prevailed last evening that the crew had been lost, but no positive information could be obtained that this rumor was well founded, and therefore a simple statement of her going down was announced. As there was no signal of distress displayed the natural supposition was that no one was aboard.
Later information confirms our previos statement, as the crew took to the yawl boat and succeded in reaching Port Colborne Monday afternoon, rowing a distance of some 40 miles.
      Buffalo Daily Courier
      October 30, 1878 2-4

      . . . . .

The heavy storm on Sunday was disasterous to shipping on the lakes. Among the list is the schr. J.G. McGRATH of St. Catharines, Canada, which went down in 150 ft. of water about 20 miles above this port. The crew saved themselves.
      Dunkirk Journal
      October 30, 1878 3-3

      . . . . .

      Port Colborne, October 28 - The schooner J.G. McGRATH, bound from Point au Pelee to St. Catharines, foundered off Long Point this morning. The crew arrived here safely, after pulling 40 miles in a small boat. Capt. McAuley is severe upon the conduct of the captain of the propeller ARAXES, for refusing to render him assistance in his distress. He says the McGRATH was in close company with the ARAXES, and was flying signals of distress. The McGRATH went down in full view of the propeller, and not the slightest exertions were made by the latter to save the suffering crew, which fortunately reached the port in safety being exposed to the buffeting of the storm for 10 hours.
      (The McGRATH is a Canadian schooner of about 15,000 bushel capacity, and has been here several times this summer in the Buffalo grain trade. - Ed.)
      Detroit Post & Tribune
      Wednesday, October 30, 1878

      . . . . .


A special dispatch from Port Colborne says: Capt. McAuley of the wrecked schr. McGRATH is severe upon the conduct of the captain of the ARAXES for refusing to render him assistance in his distress. He says the McGRATH was in close company with the ARAXES, and was flying signal of distress. The McGRATH went down in full view of the propeller, and not the slightest exertion was made by the master to save the suffering crew, which fortunately reached port in safety, being exposed to the buffetting storm for 10 hours.
      Buffalo Daily Courier
      October 31, 1878 3-3

      . . . . .

The crew of the schr. J. G. McGRATH which sank near Dunkirk on Monday morning, took to their yawl boat and succeeded in reaching Port Colborne Monday afternoon, rowing a distance of 40 miles. There was a report that all were lost.
      Cleveland Herald
      October 31, 1878

      . . . . .

Buffalo, Oct. 28 - Captain Kinney, of the schooner GEORGE H. HOLT, states that when off Dunkirk yesterday morning he saw a schooner, the name of which he could not see, give two or three lurches and go down, but no signals of any kind were displayed.
      Meaford Monitor
      Friday, November 1, 1878

      . . . . .

      Brevities - Capt. James W. Murray, of the propeller ARAXES, states that he did all in his power to assist the schooner McGRATH, foundered near Dunkirk in Sunday's storm, but the sea was so heavy that he was unable to reach the vessel It has been reported that he did not render any assistance.
      Detroit Post & Tribune
      Friday, November 1, 1878

      . . . . .


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk
Lives: nil
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1878
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.16231
Language of Item:
English
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 42.555833 Longitude: -80.197222
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
Comment on this item
Groups of Related Records
Shipwreck news
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










J. G. McGrath (Schooner), sunk, 28 Oct 1878