The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Henry Cort (Propeller), sunk by collision, 17 Dec 1917


Description
Full Text

Judge William L. Day, arbitrator in the admiralty action arising from the collision between the stmr. MIDVALE and the whaleback stmr. HENRY CORT which occurred near Bar Point December 17 last, held the CORT to blame for having backed into the path of the MIDVALE.
      The accident took place when the big fleet was on the way down on the final trip last fall. The MIDVALE had on a load of ore and the CORT was engaged in breaking the fleet out of the ice. The latter was sunk by the force of the bump. A reward was offered early in the spring for the location of the CORT, and Capt. W.W. Smith of the Pittsburg Steamship Co. found her and had her properly marked.
      Buffalo Daily Courier
      May 25, 1918 2-5

      . . . . .

      Accidents and storms on the Great Lakes in 1918 resulted in the loss of 93 lives, of which 76 passed out on Lake Superior. The important marine events follow: -
      September 23 - Whaleback steamer HENRY CORT sunk by the steamer MIDVALE late
in December, 1917, was raised. (part)
      Collingwood Bulletin
      January 23, 1919


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk by collision
Remarks: Raised
Date of Original:
1917
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.16494
Language of Item:
English
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 42.055277 Longitude: -83.116388
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Henry Cort (Propeller), sunk by collision, 17 Dec 1917