The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Siberia (Propeller), U115848, sunk, 20 Oct 1905


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Capt. George E. Banham and part of the crew of the steamer SIBERIA, which is on the bottom near Long Point, boarded the wrecking tug SAGINAW of the Great Lakes Towing Co., yesterday morning and started for the scene of the disaster. The heavy seas were so threatening that all agreed it would be wise to defer the attempt to raise the SIBERIA until the weather should be more favorable.
      The cargo of the SIBERIA consists of about 90,000 bushels of barley, which must be got out of the water at once. Marine men say it will hardly bring 15 cents as damaged grain, unless saved without delay. The SIBERIA was shoved in under the point by the captain of the WADE, and lies in comparatively smooth water. The two mates were left aboard the ship to watch her.
      The SAGINAW tug left this morning at 9:30 with the officers of the SIBERIA and a part of the crew, and they will reach the stranded vessel this afternoon. It is believed that the steamer can be pumped out, in which case a large portion of the barley ought to be in fair condition. Nothing definate will be known however, concerning the condition of the ship and cargo until reports are heard from the tug SAGINAW.
      Buffalo Evening News
      October 23, 1905

      . . . . .

      The wrecking tug SAGINAW, which left here yesterday with the officers and crew of the SIBERIA, will pump out the stranded vessel, when she will be brought to Buffalo for repairs. The SAGINAW will also look after the steamer FRANK L. VANCE, which was filling with water Saturday morning.
      Buffalo Evening News
      October 25, 1905

      . . . . .

      A private telegram from Port Rowan, Ont., last night gave little hope for the rescue of the propeller SIBERIA, which is sunk inside of Long Point. The wrecking tug SAGINAW which went from this port with pumps and other equipment for the rescue of the steamer, was compelled to leave the boat owing to the heavy sea which came up as a result of the northwester which swept up the bay inside of the point.
      Buffalo Evening News
      October 26, 1905

      . . . . .

      STEAMER "SIBERIA" IS GIVEN UP.
After a careful examination of the steamer SIBERIA, lying on the bottom under Long Point, the wrecking tug SAGINAW returned yesterday with the crew of the steamer. Capt. Watt of the SAGINAW said last night that on account of the heavy northwest wind which was blowing he was unable to get to work on the SIBERIA with his pumps and that she was rapidly pounding to pieces in the heavy sea.
Capt. Wicks, commander of the Gilchrist fleet, was a passenger on the SAGINAW and carefully examined the wreck and it was under his instructions that the SIBERIA was abandoned. She will undoubtedly break up within a few hours, and her cargo is already a total loss. She had 91,000 bushels of barley which was insured for $36,000. She was a wooden hull without marine insurance.
      Buffalo Evening News
      October 28, 1905

      . . . . .

The weather was such this morning, that Wrecking Master George W. Pfohl decided to make an attempt to reach the sunken steamer SIBERIA, now under Long Point. The steamer MADDEN, which is chartered to lighter the SIBERIA, came up from Tonawanda and after coaling this morning took the tow-barge KATHERINE of the Empire Limestone Company and started for the wreck at noon. Reports from Long Point state that the wind has died out and that there is no sea, and that the barge may be got alongside the SIBERIA.
Quite a party went up on the MADDEN, including the manager of the Madden Line, M.J. Lynn of Bay City; Wrecking Master Pfohl and Messrs. Walter J. Schlafer and Fred Mayer of Smith, Davis & Company. They will reach the SIBERIA tonight, and if the pumps work smoothly the barge will be filled with the barley in the SIBERIA, and will return tomorrow.
      Buffalo Evening News
      November 17, 1905


      STEAMER SIBERIA'S CARGO HERE.
      Steamer MADDEN Arrives With 15,000 Bushels and Will Return for Wreck.
      The steamer LIZZIE MADDEN, Captain William J. Lynn, arrived in this port Saturday evening with 15,000 bushels of the cargo of barley now lying in the sunken steamer SIBERIA, under Long Point. The MADDEN left for the scene of the wreck a week ago last Friday, together with the Cowles Sandsucker and tow barge KATHERINE, They arrived at the SIBERIA the next day, which was ideal for the work in hand. The work of setting up the discharge pump was at once begun, and was completed in 10 hours. Sunday morning following, however, a heavy northeast gale sprang up, and the sea was so rough that the work was abandoned and the MADDEN pulled away about a mile and anchored.
      They were unable to resume operations until Tuesday, when they again began pumping. It was soon discovered that the discharge pump could not take care of the water thrown out by the Sandsucker, and half-speed was required. The tow barge was loaded and Tuesday night left for Buffalo with 8,000 bushels. Wednesday morning the building of bulkheads was started and everything was got in shape to commence loading the MADDEN, Thursday morning. During Thursday and Friday of last week about 15,000 bushels were placed in the MADDEN, and she left for home Saturday morning.
      The Sandsucker worked like a charm and in five minutes lowered the water in the SIBERIA 12 inches. During the gale on the previous Sunday, the forward deck-house of the SIBERIA was carried away, but her hull is in good condition. Her entire deck is out of water and one may walk its length without wetting his shoes. The MADDEN and the Sandsucker leave tomorrow, when in addition to taking out more of the grain, of which there is still 50,000 bushels in the SIBERIA, an attempt will be made to float the big steamer, which authorities say can be done.
      It seems that the farmers in the neighborhood of Long Point took very little grain from the SIBERIA. The barley appears to be in excellent condition on arrival here, and a large quantity of it has been sold for delivery to the Dold Malt house, where it is being dried out.
      Buffalo Evening News
      November 27, 1905
     





      STEAMER MADDEN BACK FROM LONG POINT.
The steamer LIZZIE MADDEN has returned to Buffalo with 30,000 bushels of barley taken out of the sunken steamer SIBERIA at Long Point. The MADDEN had a rough trip and her work was of the first order. She reached the wrecked SIBERIA last Friday morning, together with the sand-sucker SANDY HOOK. The SIBERIA was found to be in the same position as when left the week before. Diver John Wilson went down and examined the SIBERIA and found the starboard arch broken in two and it was also discovered that the top sides were all loose. The ship was open in many places, and no attempt was made to raise her.
Work on pumping out the grain was commenced, but the heavy seas obliged the and-sucker to cease operations three different times. The Gilchrist people, owners of the SIBERIA, had advised Wrecking Master George W. Pfohl that they would not pay any salvage on the boat, which left him no alternative but to abandon her. He says this morning that she could be raised, but that her hull would be valueless, the only salvage being her machinery, which wouldn't warrant saving it. Some 50,000 bushels of the grain is left in the hull of the SIBERIA but probably no attempt will be made to save it.
      Buffalo Evening News
      December 8, 1905

      . . . . .

      Propeller SIBERIA, U. S. No. 115848 of 1,892 tons gross, built 1882. Foundered October 20, 1905 at Long Point, Lake Erie. Total loss
      Loss of American Vessels
      1906 List of Merchant Vessels, U.S.A.

      . . . . .

      SIBERIA, Official U. S. Number 115848, Propeller of 1892 gross tons, 1461 net tons. Built 1882 at West Bay City. Home port, Cleveland. 272 x 39 x 22.5. Crew of 15.
      List of American Vessels
      of the United States, 1904

      . . . . .

      Sunk Oct. 1905 with a cargo of barley, 180 x 25, wreck lies in 15 to 20 feet of water, boiler, prop, ribs and some flooring and decking, dishes, gauges are about all that remains of the SIBERIA.
      Doug Fetherling Notes

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Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk
Lives: nil
Freight: barley
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1905
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.17019
Language of Item:
English
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 42.555833 Longitude: -80.197222
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Siberia (Propeller), U115848, sunk, 20 Oct 1905