The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Algeria (Schooner), U107222, sunk, 9 May 1906


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LAKE BOATS ARE WRECKED IN STORM.
      SEVERAL LOST WHEN SCHOONER ALGERIA SINKS - BARGE WILCOX GONE.
      MARINE STRIKE HELD RESPONSIBLE.
Cleveland, May 8. - The captain of the schooner ALGERIA, which foundered early today, was Martin Ellen. It is now practically certain that he and three of his men perished.
Cleveland, May 8. - The schooner ALGERIA sank about two miles off the harbor of Cleveland this morning, and it is thought three men lost their lives.
      The schooner IRON QUEEN is in a sinking condition outside the breakwater, and the crew of eight was taken off by the life saving crew.
The storm of last night and early today was a menace to shipping outside the harbor.
The big steamers tied up by strike came inside the breakwater, but the small schooners could not get in. Signals of distress came to the Life Saving Station and Capt. Motley of the life saving crew went out to the IRON QUEEN, reaching the crew with difficulty. They could not reach the ALGERIA, which went down about two miles out. Capt. Motley thinks there were at least three men the ALGERIA but does not know their names.
      MOST VIOLENT STORM.
The schooner ALGERIA was owned by Capt. James Davidson of Port Huron, Mich. She was 2,000 tons burden and was loaded with iron, ore. The ALGERIA generally carried a crew of seven men. It is known that three or four of these men came ashore last night.
The schooner IRON QUEEN is slowly sinking. She sprung a leak during the height of the storm and rapidly filled. She has a gross tonnage of 1384 tons.
The present storm is said by vessel men to be the most violent experienced in May on the lakes in many years.

      * * * *

Colchester, May 9. -- A barge with two masts lies sunk off here one-quarter of a mile from shore. The decks are under water, but there are evidences that the crew escaped. The wreck was apparently an old schooner, bound up with coal. Thus far it has been impossible to get particulars, but the vessel foundered some time in the night.
The vessel proved to be the M. I. WILCOX of Vermilion, O. She was loaded with 71,118 tons of coal at Huron, for the Pittsburg Coal Company. The captain expected to get a tug at Green Island, but failed to do so. He then started for Detroit River under sail, but was caught in the gale last night.
      * * * *
According to information received locally, the wrecks of the ALGERIA and the IRON QUEEN at Cleveland be laid almost directly to the marine strike. The ALGERIA was towed to a point several points outside of the Cleveland breakwater by the steamer BULGARIA, where the latter left her, and owing to inability to obtain a tug the ALGERIA had to remain outside, where she was caught in the storm. The IRON QUEEN was also towed to a point outside the breakwater, and a tug could not be obtained to take her inside.
It will be noticed that the WILCOX also was unable to get a tug and started out under sail, with disastrous consequences.
      Buffalo Evening News
      Wednesday, May 9, 1906

      . . . . .

      THREE LIVES LOST BY SINKING OF SCHOONER "ALGERIA" AT CLEVELAND.
Cleveland, O., May 9. - The schooner ALGERIA sank about two miles off the harbor of Cleveland this morning and it is thought three men lost their lives.
The schooner IRON QUEEN is in a sinking condition outside the breakwater and the crew of eight was taken off by the members of the life saving crew.
The storm of last night and early today with the heavy sea it kicked up was a menace to shipping outside the harbor. The big steamers that had been tied up there by the strike came inside the breakwater, but the small schooners could not get in. Signals of distress came to the life saving station and Captain Motley of the life saving crew, went out to the IRON QUEEN, rescuing the eight members of the crew with difficulty. They could not reach the ALGERIA, which went down about two miles out. Captain Motley thinks there were at least three men on the ALGERIA, but does not know their names.
The schooner ALGERIA was owned by Capt. James Davidson of Port Huron, Mich. She was of 2,000 tons burden and was loaded with iron ore.
The ALGERIA generally carried a crew of seven men. It is known that three of four of these man came ashore last night.
The schooner IRON QUEEN is slowly sinking. She sprang a leak during the height of the storm and rapidly filled with water. She has a gross tonnage of 1,384 tons.
      The Buffalo Times
      May 9, 1906

      . . . . .

      LOSING START FOR THE UNDERWRITERS
      Losses This Season Already Amount to Nearly Half a Million.
Marine underwriters have been hit almost as hard this season as they were last up to this time. It is said that the losses already amount to nearly half a million dollars, and with such a handicap, the season will hardly be a paying one, even with the best of luck from now to the close of navigation next fall.
The loss on the barge ALGERIA, which foundered off Cleveland night before last, is $35.000 on hull and $II,000 on her cargo of ore. The underwriters will lose $30,000 on the hull of the IRON QUEEN, and $7,500 on her cargo of ore. There will be a loss to pay also on the barge DAYTON, which has been waterlogged For the last Four days at Collins Inlet in Georgian Bay. She was loaded with lumber. Her deck load was taken off, but even then she could not be pumped out and an expedition from Collingwood has gone to her assistance The ZIMMERMAN-SAXONA disaster will cost the underwriters $100,000 and many minor accidents will run the figures up very high. Small losses like the damage by fire night before last to the barge WILSON at Byng Inlet, above the Soo, and the damage to the MOHEGAN, which had some plates torn off in collision with the J. J. McWILLIAMS in the harbor Tuesday night, will help to swell the total amount of loss, and the underwriters are theretore not in very good spirits. The claim that the loss of the ALGERIA and IRON QUEEN are directly traceable to the strike, because both boats foundered in plain sight of shore, for the reason that there were no tugs to go to their assistance.
      Buffalo Evening News
      Thursday, May 10, 1906

      . . . . .
     
      SUNKEN SCHOONER REMOVED.
Cleveland, Nov. 8. -- Walter G. Metcalf a diver, reported to the government engineer that he had completed the work of removing the sunken schooner ALGERIA, and a sudsequent survey made by the government engineer proves that there is now 28 feet of water where the boat went down, and the obstruction to navigation at the approach to Cleveland is removed.
      Buffalo Evening News
      November 8, 1906


Schooner ALGERIA. U.S. No. 107222. Of 2,038 tons gross. Built 1896. Foundered with the loss of 2 lives on May 9, 1906 at Cleveland, Ohio. 12 persons were on board.
      Loss of American Vessels During Fiscal year 1906
      Merchant Vessel List, U.S., 1906


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk
Lives: 2
Freight: iron ore
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1906
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.17101
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ohio, United States
    Latitude: 41.4995 Longitude: -81.69541
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Algeria (Schooner), U107222, sunk, 9 May 1906