The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Dean Richmond (Propeller), U6102, sunk, 14 Oct 1893


Description
Full Text

18 LOST
      THE DEAN RICHMOND FOUNDERED OFF DUNKIRK IN A GALE.
      The Crew All Drowned !
      Three Bodies Have Been Recovered At Dunkirk
      The Others Are Supposed To Be At Angola.

      ON VAN BUREN POINT.

      The Big Steamer Went On The Rocks And Is A Total Loss.
      Not A Soul Survived So Far As Can Be Learned Now.
      Miles And Miles Of Wreckage.
      Following the news of the terrible storm of Saturday in this city comes new of the foundering of the steamer DEAN RICHMOND off Dunkirk and the probable loss of her entire crew of 18 people.
      She was passed Saturday afternoon by steamers which made Buffalo. She was then apparently in great distress but her loss was not dreamed of.
      The HELENA which came in with the AMBOY in tow Saturday afternoon tried to give the RICHMOND aid but could not.
      The first intimation of the staunch vessel's loss was when a Dunkirk boy went out early yesterday morning to see the sea in all the grandeur of wind-lashed fury and found bits of wreckage, heaps of merchandise and the dead body of a man with a life preserver on buried in a pile of wreckage.
      The tale is a sad one and the probabilities are that no one will ever know how the DEAN RICHMOND foundered and her crew perished.
      A very few of the old sailors have a hope that some of the crew might have been saved. This can hardly be so, however. No big boats are known to have been near the spot after Saturday noon. [P.1, c.8]


      THE STORY OF THE WRECK.
      Struggling For Her Life The RICHMOND Passed From View Forever.
      PART OF HER DEAD CREW WASHED ASHORE.
      [Special to the Evening News.]
      Dunkirk, Oct. 16. - Late Saturday the big steamer DEAN RICHMOND was seen a few miles above here fighting for her life in a wicked sea.
      Bits of her wreckage and the dead bodies of some of her crew found on the Dunkirk shore yesterday morning tell eloquently how the fight resulted.
      The ship wrecked, the crew dead - every soul, so far as can be told now, is in brief the story of the loss.
      All day long the steamer's wreckage has been coming ashore, sweeping in on the waves with the dead bodies of the crew.
      Just when the RICHMOND broke up is not known, but it is thought to have been about 2 o'clock yesterday morning, for people in Dunkirk heard her whistling in distress long after midnight.
      The first the people of Dunkirk knew of the wreck was at 8 o'clock yesterday morning when Frand Bowling went down on the shore east of the harbor to see the storm.
      All along the shore he found bits of wreckage and piles of merchandise. He suspected a wreck of great extent and began an examination of the stuff.
      In a pile of broken wood, boxes and barrels he saw a life preserver end sticking out, he tried to draw it out to fins the boat's name on it.
      It was held fast, and when he cleared away the wreckage he found it was attached to the body of a man about 25 years old, dressed in a sailor's storm clothing.
      Coroner Blood had the body taken to the Morgue and searched. In the pocket were found letters addressed to A.B. Dodge, Toledo, care steamer DEAN RICHMOND. The letter came from Kansas, O., and was signed Mollie.
      Then a systematic search along the shore was begun, which was joined in by great many people.
      For miles the shore was covered with wreckage from the vessel, boxes of merchandise and barrels and sacks of flour.
      The sharks made their appearance early in the day and began looting the debris. Men came in wagons and carted away the flour and boxes. They paid no attention to searching the wreckage for bodies, only caring for what they could steal.
      About 3 o'clock in the afternoon another body was found near Polandertown, west of here. Before the Coroner arrived a second body was washed in, and both were taken to the Morgue. Both were sailors, but could not be identified.
      All doubts regarding the identity of the vessel were set at rest late in the afternoon, when a big piece of wreckage bearing the name "DEAN RICHMOND" was washed ashore.
      The three bodies found had life preservers on, so the wreck must have been expected. It is thought other bodies have been carried onto the beach at Silver Creek, Angola and Irving. The current sets that way.
      THE LOST CREW.
      The crew of the DEAN RICHMOND when it left Toledo, was made up of the following persons:
      G.W. Stoddard, captain, Toledo.
      George Boylessen, second mate, East Toledo. [Bolsen ?]
      Samuel Meadows, wheelsman, Toledo.
      E. Wheeler, lookout, Toledo.
      Frank Earnest, lookout, North Toledo.
      A. Dodge, second cook, Toledo.
      James Evans, chief engineer, shipped at Toledo.
      Jacob Earnest, deckhand, Toledo.
      William Zink, deckhand, Toledo.
      George M. Schilling, porter, Toledo.
      Walter Goodyear, first mate, Ottawa, Lake Mich.
      J.E. Brady, wheelsman, Residence unknown.
      Mrs. Ritta Ellsworth, stewardess, Alymer, Ont.
      Frank Hinton, second engineer, Port Huron.
      Herman Beathan, fireman, residence unknown.
      William Sargenfrie, fireman, residence unknown.
      Frank Patten, deckhand, residence unknown.
      Unknown man, deckhand, shipped at Buffalo.
      Capt. Stoddart leaves a wife and family; Boisen a wife. Mrs. Ellsworth is a widow and has children somewhere in the west. Frank Hilton was a sole support of a mother and sister. The chief engineer, J.H. Hogan, who left the boat before she sailed, is at the World's Fair, he is part owner of the lost steamer
      Dunkirk, N.Y. Oct 16 - Up to noon five bodies from the wrecked DEAN RICHMOND have been recovered. They have not yet been identified.
      Searching parties are at work, and it is probable that more bodies will be found during the day. It is now known that not one of the entire crew escaped death. [p.1, c.7 & 8]
      also
      THE DEAN RICHMOND.
      She Was Once A Buffalo Boat.
      Seen Saturday By The HELENA Making a Heroic Fight.
      About the only thing marine men are taking of is the foundering of the DEAN RICHMOND. She was looked upon as a safe boat. She was built in 1864 for the Western Transportation Company. She was rebuilt in 1874 and recalked in 1890.
      Bottsford and others of Port Huron bought her some years from the Western Transportation Company, and have been running her in the Toledo, St. Louis & Kansas City Line. She ran between this port and Toledo.
      The boat was seen off Erie Saturday by the captains of the steamers HELENA, NEOSHA and W.H. STEVENS. They were trying to make Buffalo. A high sea was running and none of the boats could reach her to assist her. Her mast was gone and one smokestack had blown away. From the way the RICHMOND was floundering about, it was quite evident her steering gear was out of order.
      When the boat did not appear Saturday night no anxiety was felt over her safety by Buffalo people. Even yesterday morning when she did not appear nobody expected to hear of her sinking, and it was not until the afternoon, when a report reached this city that three bodies had been washed ashore, was any anxiety really felt.
      Capt. George Stoddard was one of the best-known sailors on the lakes. He lived at Toledo, where he leaves a family.
      So far as known there was only one Buffalo man on the steamer. He was Francis Patton of 145 Gelston street.
      There is no doubt the RICHMOND went on the rocks at Van Buren Point. If she had gone on the reef she would in all probability have remained there. The GOLDEN FLEECE wreck can still be seen. The PASSAIC went ashore at the Point last year, but all her people were rescued.
      Midnight last night the beach was still thronged with people notwithstanding the terrible storm raging at the time. Well organized searching parties are quartered at intervals between Van Buren Point and the Battery Point, and a vigilant search for bodies will be kept up until all are recovered.
It was reported late last night, that a life-boat containing four of the RICHMOND's crew came ashore above Van Buren. All inquiries fail to substantiate the truth of the rumor.
      It is probable if any had escaped they would come to Dunkirk and report, as this is the nearest telegraph station. [p.1 c,7]

      also

      THE CAPTAIN'S BODY FOUND.
      Six Bodies From The Wrecked RICHMOND Have Been Found And Identified.
      Dunkirk, Oct. 16. - All the morning searching parties have been out along the shore looking for the bodies of the crew of the RICHMOND. There were three bodies in the Morgue this morning. They were recognized by the Company's Agent Mr. Hill from Buffalo, as those of A.B. Dodge, Samuel Meadows and William Brown At 11 o'clock a searching party found three more and when they arrived at the Morgue one was recognized as that of the captain of the RICHMOND, G.W. Stoddart of Toledo. His watch was stopped at 12:30, showing that to have been about the time the steamer went down.
The other bodies were those of the stewardess, Mrs. Ritta Ellsworth, and the second mate, George Boylessen. These bodies were all in bad shape and when the were found were pounding against the rocks.
In Boylessen's pocket were found all his papers, showing that he must have known that there was little or no hope for the boat, and prepared for the wreck by attempting to save all he could of his valuables.
Search parties have been sent out all along the shore for miles in each direction to look for the bodies of the rest of the crew and bring them to this city.

      also

      E X T R A !

      A SURVIVOR
      One Man Only Escaped From The DEAN RICHMOND.
      24 WERE DROWNED.
      The Captain's Wife And Three Children Were On Board The Vessel.
      The Survivor's Tale.
Dunkirk, Oct. 16 - 2 P. M. - Only one man escaped from the lost steamer DEAN RICHMOND, and he was found wandering on the beach near Van Buren Point in a half demented condition by an Observer reporter. He was haggard and worn and his eyes sunken in his head told a story of terrible suffering. He was found aimlessly wandering up and down the beach, and when spoken to burst into tears and said he was looking for his dog.
      He was questioned and said he had been washed off the RICHMOND, and was unquestionably the only man saved from the vessel. After he had been cared for and given stimulants he recovered sufficiently to tell the story of the awful last hours of the steamer.
      He said his name was C.L. Clarke, and he shipped in Toledo just before the RICHMOND sailed. He was coming to Buffalo and was working his way, it is believed.
      "There were 19 in the RICHMOND's crew," he said, "beside Capt. Stoddart, his wife and three children. We left Toledo at 6 o'clock Friday night, and sailed along all right until we got into the gale on Saturday. It struck us hard from the very start, but if we had had good luck we would have weathered the storm and been safe in port at this minute.
      "We tried to get into Erie harbor but could not on account of the choppy sea, and then Capt. Stoddart decided to make the run to Buffalo, if he could. We were badly wrenched by the heavy sea which struck us, it seemed, from every side.
      "About 2 P. M., after matters had grown worse right along, we sighted a couple of steamers. They were quite a distance away, but we signalled them for assistance. Capt. Stoddart had not given up at that time, but felt it would be safer if we were nearer some other vessel. He was thinking of his wife and children. The steamer we signalled either did not see us or could not get to us, for they went right along fighting their way into the storm, heading toward Buffalo.
      "The waves ran right over our decks and everything which was moveable was swept overboard. The captain's wife and children were locked up in the cabin for safety's sake, and the crew was working for their lives outside, under direction of the captain, who never lost his head for a moment.
      "An hour later we had lost a mast and smokestack. Then we continued to drift along at the mercy of the wind and waves.
      "About 7 o'clock in the evening the wheel house was washed away. The rudder and wheel were broken and we were badly crippled. We were then about 15 miles from shore and after considerable work managed to set the rudder so we could make for the shore.
"The captain had made up his mind to run for the shore and beach his vessel. He made fair headway with a hard fight and I began to get things ready to get out in the yawl boat with the captain's wife and children. I had a little dog on board which I thought a great deal of.
"I tied him in the boat and opened my jack knife, stuck it up in the gunwhale of the yawl, good and deep. I went back to the captain and just before I reached him, we were washed and I was carried overboard.
      "This must have been about 11 o'clock. I gave myself up for lost when I found myself in the water. I kept sight of the RICHMOND's lights for some time and saw her drifting down the lake, turning and twisting in every direction. I knew I was as good as dead and wondered whether the others would be saved or not.
      "And then I lost consciousness and did not know anything until I found myself lying on the beach near a town, which I found out was Silver Creek. When I came to myself I went into the town. I had some money and got something to eat, found out where I was and then came here to learn what had become of the steamer.
      "I heard this morning that she had gone down, and then I came over here and tried to find the boat and my dog. He must be suffering terribly, for he was tied in."
      Clarke insisted on continuing his search for his pet and a mile or two up the shore an overturned yawl boat from the RICHMOND was found. Clark saw it, junped forward and threw it over.
      Inside, tied to the seat, was the dead body of a little dog, and in the gunwhale, sunk deeply, was Clarke's jack-knife. [p.1, c.2]
      Buffalo Evening News
      Monday, October 16, 1893

      . . . . .

      BIG STORM OF SATURDAY NIGHT
      The MINNEHAHA loaded with corn went ashore on Saturday afternoon near Manistee. 6 killed, one saved. A few minutes after striking the bar the vessel broke in two and within half an hour nothing but the bow was left. There were no life-preservers on board.
The barge J.D. SAWYER was cut adrift by the B.W. ARNOLD near the Beavers in the saturday evening terrific gale. She is presumed lost.
      Eighteen were lost as the steamer DEAN RICHMOND goes down off Dunkirk, N.Y. She was chartered to the Toledo, St. Louis & Kansas City Line.
The barge HECLA is ashore at Wellington, Ontario.
The Barge J.C. MARTIN is ashore at Racine.
The tug ACME foundered on Lake Huron near Black River. None lost.
The schooners MORTON and CASTALIA are ashore near Sault Ste. Marie.
The steamer E.P. CURTIS and tow, ISABEL REED, T.S. FASSET and NELSON HOLLAND are ashore near Cheboygan.
The schooner CRAWFORD is ashore on Bois Blanc Island, Straits of Mackinac.
The schooner YUKON is ashore at Waiski Bay.
The barges KNIGHT TEMPLAR and SWEEPSTAKES, consorts of the steamer SALINE, are ashore between Cheboygan and Duncan.
      Port Huron Daily Times
      Monday, October 16, 1893
     
      . . . . .

      A FIGHT FOR LIFE
      ----o----
      A Survivor's Story of the Loss of the Dean Richmond
Dunkirk, October 16. - One man survived the terible disaster of the steamer Dean Richmond, which was sunk in deep water off this port Saturday night. He is C. L. Clark, who was wheelsman on the Richmond and shipped at Toledo. He came into town today, nearly dead from his terrible fight for life in the angry waters. He was interviewed this afternoon and gave a vivid story of the loss of the steamer.
"We left Toledo Friday morning," he said, "bound for Buffalo. The weather looked bad and the captain made up his mind to put into Erie for shelter. The gale struck us during Friday night, but we made good progress against it for a long time. Instead of going down, which we supposed it would, it only increased in violence as the night wore on, and Saturday morning Captain Stoddard headed for Erie. The sea was to high to attempt it, as our course was in the trough of the sea. The gale became a hurricane in the morning, and at 2 o'clock in te afternoon the smokestacks went over the side. One hour later a huge wave came over our boats and washed the pilot house off. The wheelsman on duty had a narrow escape at that time and the wheel and steering gear were swept away. The rudder broke and the Richmond drifted helplessly in the sea. The engines were kept moving and it was tried to run her ashore, but this failed also. The seas were following each other in quick succession and the cabins were nearly all gone. At 11 o'clocl I was caught by a wave which landed me some distance from the boat. I turned on my back as a blinding flash of lightning revealed the steamer. I saw the hatch covers fly up and the the boat rolled to one side and took in much water. Then she seemed to stand on end and go down. The light faded and I never saw her again.
"How I got ashore is a mystery to me. I had nothing to cling to and as the waves broke over me I was rendered unconscious by the force of their weight. When I came to I was on the beach, surrounded by wreckage and about four miles from the town.* Slowly my strength came back , and in two or three hours I managed to get on my feet and make my way to a house, where I was given food. I then made my way to town. The captain had his wife and three children, and as they have not been heard from, they must have down with the boat. We had four life boats, but in the storm were unable to launch them."
      Detroit Free Press
      Tues., Oct. 17, 1893

*Most of the bodies eventually found were wearing life jackets.

      . . . . .


      Clark' Story Discredited
      Buffalo, NY Oct 17.--A special dispatch from Dunkirk this morning says the story told by the man Clark, who claims to be the sole survivor of the wrecked Dean Richmond, is wholly discredited here. The agents of the boat line said no such man shipped at Toledo. Clark's story speaks of Capt. Stoddards wife and children being aboard the Dean Richmond when she went down. Coroner Blood of Dunkirk has received a dispatch from Mrs. Stoddard, dated Toledo, in which she says she will arrive in Dunkirk to-day. Clark has disappeared. There seems to be ground, however, for hope that a single person escaped.
      Cleveland Leader
      October18,1893.
     
      . . . . .
     
      T H I R T E E N !
      The Bodies Of About Half Of The DEAN RICHMOND's Crew Recovered.
      TEN ARE IDENTIFIED.
      Relatives From Toledo And Buffalo Are At Dunkirk
      Waiting For The Sea To Give Up Its Dead.
Dunkirk, Oct. 17. - The scenes around Coroner Blood's Morgue are sad. Many of the relatives of the lost crew of the RICHMOND have arrived and identified bodies.
      Of the 13 which have been found so far 10 have been identified as follows:
      Capt. George W. Stoddart, Toledo.
      Walter M. Goodyear, first mate, Ottawa Lake, Mich.
      George Botson, second mate, East Toledo.
      Mrs. Retta Ellsworth, stewardess, Aylmer, Ont.
      A.B. Dodge, second cook, Toledo.
      Samuel Meadows, wheelsman, Toledo
      E. Wheeler, lookout, Toledo.
      William Zink, deckhand, Toledo.
      J.E. Brady, wheelsman, uncertain, shipped at Toledo.
      George M. Schilling, uncertain, shipped at Toledo.
      The body of Wheeler was identified by his father, Ezra E. Wheeler of Toledo
      Mr. & Mrs. J.B. Wenrich, the latter a sister of chief engineer, J.P. Hogan, who escaped through a visit to the World's Fair, were on hand, having come from Fredonia to search for their nephew, Frank Hilton, the second engineer. James Patton of 63 Dart street, Buffalo, is also here looking after his son, Frank Patton, deckhand.
      Almost all the bodies are badly battered and bruised. Some were found on the beach high and dry, others were found pounding among the rocks.
The theory is advanced that all the people on the RICHMOND died of exhaustion as they all had life preservers on and in almost every case the lungs are free from water, showing they were not drowned.
      The man, C.L. Clarke, who claims to be the only survivor of the RICHMOND, has disappeared. Some people doubt his story, but he had so many facts it is hard to understand how he could get them unless he was really on Board the lost vessel.
      J.E. Botsford and J.H. Hogan, owners of the RICHMOND, the latter the chief engineer, arrived from Port Huron at 10:30 last night. Both felt badly over the loss of the RICHMOND and crew.
      Buffalo Evening News
      Tuesday, October 17, 1893 p.4, c.1.

      also

      THE RICHMOND'S HULL.
      It Is Believed To Be On The Lake Bottom, Eight Miles Off Van Buren Point.
      Just where the DEAN RICHMOND sank nobody knows. Mr. H.E. Hyde, agent of the Clover Leaf Line, which operated the boat, was in Dunkirk yesterday and expressed his belief that the hull was at the bottom of the lake about eight miles off Van Buren Point.
      "Judging," he said, "from the position of the bodies when found and the wreckage strewn along the beach, it appears that her upper works only have drifted ashore with some light merchandise from the decks. The hull is certainly at the bottom."
      Mr. Hyde further said; "I do not believe the RICHMOND put into Erie on Saturday as has been reported. Why should she ? Long before she was said to have left there she was seen in the lake many miles this side of that port. Capt. Stoddart, if he had been in Erie would, I hardly think, jeopardize the life of his crew by facing the storm which was then raging."
      Capt. J.G. Orr of C.B. Armstrong & Co. of this city, who was in Erie on Saturday, does not believe the boat put in Erie. He said; "I left Erie on Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock and she had not put in up to that time. If ever she did there is not the slightest likelihood a captain would ever attempt to put out in such a sea as was then on."
      Capt. A.A. Swan has gone to Dunkirk to protect the interests of the underwriters - especially those of Smith, Davis & Co., who have $12,000 of the $44,275 insurance on the hull.
      Buffalo Evening News
      Tuesday, October 17, 1893 p.4, c.1

      . . . . .

      NINE MISSING.
      The Lake Still Has Nearly Half The Richmond's Crew.
      Old Lake Erie has not yet given up nine members of the crew of the ill-fated propeller DEAN RICHMOND.
      So far 11 bodies have been recovered and they are all in the Morgue at Dunkirk. The lake shore is being searched by the friends of the missing sailor who were on the boat, but so far their search has been fruitless, and it may be many days before the remainder of the bodies are cast up by the waters of the lake.
      J.E. Bottsford and J.H. Hogan, two of the owners of the boat, drove to the scene of the wreck yesterday and fully identified the wreckage as that of the DEAN RICHMOND. Mr. Hogan was chief engineer on the boat as well. He left it a few days before she went down, to visit the World's Fair.
      Mr. Hogan thinks the primary cause of the trouble was the blowing away of the smoke stacks. That made it impossible to keep up steam and then the vessel drifted helplessly in the seas and broke up while the brave crew were trying to head her to Buffalo. The owners value the boat at $50,000. She carried about $40,000 insurance.
      A yawl boat from the RICHMOND was picked up at Van Buren Point yesterday. It was in a good state of preservation.
Mr. Hogan's nephew, Frank Hilton, was one of the engineers on the boat who is missing. Henry Roberts of 117 Commercial street called at the Morgue at Dunkirk yesterday. He was looking for Thomas Sullivan, who was on the RICHMOND when she went down, but did not find him.
The bodies of Capt. G.W. Stoddart, George Boison, A.B. Dodge, Samuel Meadows, William Zink and E. Wheeler will be sent to Toledo today, and that of Walter M. Goodyear to Ottawa Lake, Mich.
      Buffalo Evening News
      Wednesday, October 18, 1893 p.1, c.6

      . . . . .

      ONE OF THE RICHMOND'S CREW.
      Dunkirk, Nov. 16. - Last night's heavy wind brought to light another of the DEAN RICHMOND's crew. The body washed ashore near Crooked Creek and this morning was taken to the Morgue. On the left arm is tattooed an anchor in red and blue and on the right arm, was a ship. Outside of these marks there was nothing on the person by which he could be identified. The body is badly decomposed and had the appearance of being in the water for a long time.
      Buffalo Evening News
      Thursday, November 16, 1893 p.4, c.3

      . . . . .

      Dunkirk. - The tug HENRY W. JOHNSON has completed the search for the wreck of the DEAN RICHMOND over the 36 square miles marked off, but found no trace of the boat. They believe now that the wreck lies nearer shore and will drag accordingly.


      Dunkirk, Sept. 3. - The search for the wreck of the DEAN RICHMOND, which foundered off this place last October with the loss of 20 lives was given up today and the boats were ordered back to Detroit. During the last two weeks the tugs have dragged over 36 square miles of the lake bottom, which was staked off as being the probable place of the wreck. Nothing was found whatever to indicate where the steamer went down.
      Buffalo Enquirer
      September 3, 1894 p.5, c.4

      . . . . .

      A WRECK DISCOVERED. -- Dunkirk, N, Y., May 24. -- A wreck of a vessel has been discovered five miles off shore, nine miles west of here. It lies in 65 feet of water, and Coroner Blood, who has begun an investigation, is confident that it is that of the steamer DEAN RICHMOND, which foundered with all on board on Oct. 14, 1893.
      Buffalo Evening News
      Friday, May 24, 1895

      . . . . .

Buffalo, Sept. 28. - What is believed by vesselmen to be the long sought wreck of the steamer DEAN RICHMOND has been located by Frederick Dorier and two companions 500 feet off Battery Point, east of Dunkirk. The wreck lies in deep water and the site has been marked.
The DEAN RICHMOND foundered off Dunkirk, Oct. 13, 1893, with the loss of all hands. The Underwriters spent a good deal of money trying to find the ship, owing to her valuable cargo, but the expeditions which swept the bottom of the lake for many miles could find no trace of the boat. The finders expect a large sum for salvage.
      Saganaw Courier-Herald
      September 29, 1900

      . . . . .

      TO RAISE CARGO
      John D. Stanton, a diver of Cleveland, has announced his intention of going after the cargo of the DEAN RICHMOND, sunk near Dunkirk. The RICHMOND had on board 30 cars of pig lead and general merchandise. She was lost nearly 50 years ago.
      Buffalo Evening News
      May 9, 1910


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk
Lives: 20
Freight: merchandise
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1893
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.17413
Language of Item:
English
  • New York, United States
    Latitude: 42.4795 Longitude: -79.33393
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
Comment on this item
Groups of Related Records
Shipwreck news
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Dean Richmond (Propeller), U6102, sunk, 14 Oct 1893