The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
C. C. Ryan (Propeller), sunk, 7 Jun 1890


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Thomas Ryan yesterday was wired from Port Huron by the master of the barge JOURNEYMAN, that the JOURNEYMAN and the COHEN had broken away from the stm. C.C. RYAN and reached Port Huron. There also was a report that somebody on the RYAN had been injured by a stroke of lightening. The tow is loaded with ice from Georgian Bay for Sullivan & Nunan of this port.
      Buffalo Daily Courier
      June 12, 1890 2-1


Port Huron, June 12. -- The steam barge CHARLES E. RYAN was sunk June 6th on lake Huron. The CHARLES E> RYAN was formerly the Canadian propeller LAKE ONTARIO, which was wrecked in 1888 and rebuilt last spring.
      Chicago Inter Ocean
      June 13, 1890
     

Port Huron, Mich., June 12. -- The steam barge RYAN foundered 10 miles north of Port Austin light Saturday night. All hands were saved except Patrick Slattery of Buffalo.
The RYAN left Georgian Bay, towing the barges E. COHEN and the JOURNEYMAN. Saturday noon the lines parted from the barges and the steamer at 10 P. M. started to leak. The water gained very fast on them and the crew took to the boats, except Slattery, the mate, who would not get in the yawl.
      After this the RYAN's quarter went under water and with a heavy roll she turned bottom side up and went down. The crew looked for Slattery, but could not find him.
      Buffalo Evening News
      June 12, 1890
     
     

      THE STEAMBARGE "C.C. RYAN" FOUNDERS IN LAKE HURON.
      Mate Slattery Goes Down With Her - The Rest Of The Crew Saved.
A dispatch from Port Huron last night said: "The steambarge CHARLES C. RYAN and consorts JOURNEYMAN and COHEN, loaded with ice, left Midland for Buffalo last Thursday. All went well until Saturday afternoon, by which time the tow had got well across Lake Huron towards Point Au Barques, when the RYAN was found to be leaking rapidly. The water continued to gain on the pumps, despite the utmost efforts of the officers and crew, and soon after dark it became evident that the steamer must be abandoned, and that very quickly. The yawl was lowered and all hands escaped, excepting Patrick Slattery of Buffalo, mate of the unlucky vessel. He refused to leave the RYAN and went down with her. As there was considerable sea on, Slattery probably thought there was no chance on the yawl living. The crew were cast about for three days, until finally picked up by the schooner BRECK, and brought to this port last night. The JOURNEYMAN and COHEN arrived here yesterday."
      The RYAN was owned by Thomas M. Ryan of this port, who rebuilt her out of the Canadian propeller LAKE ONTARIO, which was wrecked off Charlotte in the fall of 1888. The LAKE ONTARIO was built in 1872 by Simpson at St. Catharines. Mr. Ryan bought the wreck, raised it, and rebuilt it partially at Charlotte, and towed it here for completion last April. The RYAN had the old machinery, which was overhauled, and got one of the HIAWATHA's old boilers. The wood work was measured 404 tons, was given an A 2 rating by the manager of the Inland Lloyds, with a valuation of $-?,-?-. She was insured for $22,000, of which the Exchange Company has $6,000, the Security $4,000, the Reliance of Liverpool, $6,000, the Etna and Greenwich each $3,000.
      Captain Michael Carr was master of the RYAN. The mate Patrick Slattery, who went down with the steamer, was about 50 years of age, and lived in this city with his mother. He long had been a lake sailor, and had served as master. There was a report that the RYAN had been struck by lightning after getting her ice cargo aboard, and that one of her crew was injured in consequence. One of Capt. Carr's sons is master of the JOURNEYMAN.
      It is understood that the RYAN sank in deep water.
      Buffalo Daily Courier
      Friday, June 13, 1890 2-1

      . . . . .

The loss of the propeller C.C. RYAN, which occurred off Tawas on Lake Huron last Saturday might have been a long time getting abroad. Only a rumor of it was known here yesterday, though her barges arrived in Port Huron early on Wednesday. The were the JOURNEYMAN and E. COHEN, and all were loaded with ice for Buffalo. She was the old Canadian steamer LAKE ONTARIO, which Capt. Thomas Ryan of Buffalo had Americanized and rebuilt here at a cost, it is said, of upward of $35,000. She did not get out of the shipyard till late in the season and had only made a trip or two. She was commanded by Capt. Michael Carr of Buffalo. A son of the captain was in the JOURNEYMAN, and when the barges reached Port Huron it was supposed that all on the RYAN were lost. She is insured for $21,000, of which $10,000 is in companies held by Smith, Davis & Co $6,000 by the Aetna office, and $5,000 by Crosby & McDonald of Chicago. The loss will be quite serious to Capt. Ryan, who worked many a day on the rebuild of the steamer last winter and spring. Following is the press account of the loss:
      Port Huron, June 12.
The steambarge RYAN foundered ten miles north of Port Austin Light on Saturday night. All hands were saved, except Patrick Slattery of Buffalo. Capt. Carr of the RYAN give the following account of the disaster: The RYAN left Georgian Bay, towing the barges E. COHEN and the JOURNEYMAN. On Saturday noon the lines parted from the barges, and the steamer at 10 P.M. started to leak. The water gained very fast on them and the crew took to the boats, except Slattery, the mate, who would not get in the yawl. After this the RYAN's quarter went under water, and with a heavy roll, she turned bottom side up and went down. The crew looked for Slattery, but could not find him.
      After the RYAN went down, they rigged a sail made from a shirt and a bag and started for land, or in hopes of being picked up by some passing boat. They were in the boat until Monday afternoon, when they sighted the schooner BRECK. They were taken on board and arrived here last night.
      Port Huron, June 12. - The steambarge CHARLES E. RYAN, with barges COHEN and JOURNEYMAN in tow, all loaded with ice, left Midland for Buffalo last Thursday, June 5th. All went well until Saturday afternoon, by which time the tow had got well across Lake Huron towards Point Aux Barques, when the RYAN was found to be leaking rapidly. The water continued to gain on the pumps despite the utmost efforts of the officers and crew, and soon after dark it became evident that the steamer must be abandoned, and that very quickly. The yawl was lowered and all hands escaped, except Patrick Slattery of Buffalo, Mate of the unlucky vessel. He refused to leave the RYAN, and went down with her. As there was considerable sea on, Slattery probably thought there was no chance of the yawl living. The crew were cast about for three days until finally picked up by the schooner BRECK and brought to this port.
      Buffalo Morning Express
      Friday, June 13, 1890 7-1

      . . . . .

      Steambarge C.C. RYAN, of Buffalo, which foundered on Lake Huron, was rebuilt out of the Canadain prop. LAKE ONTARIO, wrecked off Charlotte in 1888. Thos. Ryan, Buffalo, bought the wreck, raised it and rebuilt it. The LAKE ONTARIO was built in 1872 by Simpson, at St. Catharines. The RYAN got one of the HIAWATHA's old boilers and her own old machinery was overhauled. Ryan claims she cost him about $30,000 but there are those who claim this is about $10,000 too high. The RYAN was insured for $22,000. It is believed her ice cargo was also insured. Pat Flattery, mate, lost, was about 50 years of age and an old lake sailor. He was unmarried and lived in Buffalo.
      Daily British Whig, Kingston
      June 16, 1890

      . . . . .
     
      STORY OF THE LOSS OF THE RYAN.
      Capt. Carr Tells (the Express) A Story Of The Diasater.
Not until now has the whole story of the loss of the steamer C.C. Ryan been told, though she went down ten days ago. Capt. Carr has been in town a day or two and last night gave the Express a history of the disaster. The RYAN with her consorts JOURNEYMAN and COHEN left Midland on Thursday, June 5th with ice for Buffalo. It was very foggy and Capt. Carr went very slow till he reached the Beckworth (sic) Island without seeing anything. He then steered for Cabbag (sic) Head and ran eleven hours when thinking he had gone far enough he changed his course and came down Lake Huron 40 miles.
The chief engineer then reported the boat leaking, but said he could keep the leak down with the condenser. But the leak increased and soon the engineer reported that the water was gaining on the pumps. There was no time to lose and the RYAN blew for her consorts to let go, after which she was headed for Alpena and ran 30 miles at the top of her speed. It was now 8 o'clock on Saturday evening and the water was up to the engine room. All pumps were at work, but soon the engineer declared that the steamer must go down very quickly. At 9:30 Capt. Carr ordered the boat launched and some things were put into it for the crew. All of the crew, the woman cook, and a man who had been working his passage down, got into the boat, but Mate Slattery refused to go. He would take his chances on the house to steam drum rather than go in the boat. For he was sure the boat would founder.
"I tried to persuade him to come with us," said Capt. Carr, "and told him we would come out all right, but he refused, so we pushed off and had got only 40 or 50 feet away when she went down. We tried to find Slattery after that, but he was surely drowned. I kept the boat near the spot till the men said we would all go down, and at last we pulled away. The men rowed and bailed all night. We had to run with the wind and it carried us back to Georgian Bay.
"We found a shirt and an old bag next day to make sail with, and we set them up on an oar so that we could make about six miles an hour. I steered the boat from the start till we were picked up by the schooner BRECK on Monday, and I think we must have sailed about 120 miles. We didnt eat or sleep during the time. There wasn't any time. The boat had to be bailed and managed very carefully to keep her afloat.
      "When we were safe on the BRECK's lumber piles some of the men were so benumbed that they couldn't walk and I wasn't much better off. I can feel it in my feet now. But they were all game. Even the woman was as brave as the rest of us and never once cried, though it was her first voyage. "The RYAN was entirely seaworthy, let people who didn't know anything about her say what they may. She handled as pretty as any boat I ever saw and was all right till she began to leak. She never rolled over, and her boiler is today as firmly fastened as any boat's ever was. I can't explain how she came to leak. It started near the boiler and it will never be known what caused it."
      Buffalo Morning Express
      Tuesday, June 17, 1890 6-4

      . . . . .

      It is reported that Sullivan, the ice dealer who lost a cargo of ice when the prop. C.C. RYAN went down on Lake Huron last summer, has begun suit against Capt. Ryan for damages.
      Buffalo Morning Express
      May 22, 1891 7-1

      . . . . .
     
      The Canadian Department of Marine and Fisheries has received from the President of the United States a magnificent gold watch, accompanied by a heavy chain, for presentation to Martin Mahoney, captain of the schooner M. L. BRECK of Kingston, in recognition of humanity in effecting the rescue of a woman and ten men, comprising the shipwrecked crew of the steamer CHARLES C. RYAN of Buffalo, June 9, 1890
      Buffalo Enquirer
      Saturday, July 11, 1891
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk
Lives: 1
Freight: ice
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1890
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.18037
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Michigan, United States
    Latitude: 44.26946 Longitude: -83.5147
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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C. C. Ryan (Propeller), sunk, 7 Jun 1890