The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Commodore Perry (Propeller), aground, 26 Jul 1910


Description
Full Text

REVENUE CUTTER PERRY IS COMPLETE LOSS.
      Vessel Was Built In Buffalo In 1884 And Was Intended For Service On Great Lakes.
      Washington, Aug. 2. - The revenue cutter PERRY, one of the smallest and the oldest of the fleet of that service, ran ashore July 26 at Tonki Point, on the east side of St. Paul Island, one of the Pribiloff group in the Bering Sea, and is a complete loss.
      News of the loss of the PERRY was telegraphed to the Treasury Department by Capt. Foley, the senior officer of the Behring Sea fleet. In his dispatch he reported that the vessel filled with water and that there were no wrecking appliances in the neighborhood.
      Capt. Foley visited the wreck, ordered her stripped and abandoned and her complement distributed to other vessels. There were no lives lost.
      The PERRY is 161 feet long, was built in 1884 at Buffalo, and was originally assigned to duty on the Great Lakes. In 1893 she was transferred to the Pacific coast, where she performed valuable duties in Alaskan waters.
      Buffalo Evening News
      August 2, 1910


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: nil
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1910
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.18185
Language of Item:
English
  • New York, United States
    Latitude: 42.88645 Longitude: -78.87837
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Commodore Perry (Propeller), aground, 26 Jul 1910