The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Almeda (Schooner), U313, aground, 4 Nov 1877


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Buffalo, Nov. 4.-- Captain McKenna telegraphs here that the schooner CITY OF TAWAS has gone to pieces. He has saved all that was possible of the vessel's outfit.
      The schooner ALMEDA is a total loss at Port Glasgow. She is insured , and also her cargo.
      The J.W. Hall Great Lakes Marine Scrapbook, November 1877


      A dispatch from Rodney, Ont., says: The schooner ALMEDA of Buffalo, Captain Michael Carr, went ashore at Port Glasgow Thursday night. She was partially loaded with the same cargo that was abandoned by the schooner LEWIS ROSS, the vessel that went ashore at the same place three weeks ago. The captain thinks she will be a total wreck, as her back is broken now and nearly every plank in her has started. The crew are all safe.
      Cleveland Herald
      November 6, 1877


      The Detroit Post says: The expedition from this city to rescue the schooner ALMEDA, ashore near New Glasgow, on the Canada side of Lake Erie, is likely to end quietly after all. The owner of the tug WINSLOW disclaims any intention to violate the laws of Canada or offend the authorities in any particular. Whether it is against the law to rescue a vessel in distress on a foreign shore is still a mooted question. In this case, however, we learn that the American tug will not come in contact with the wrecked vessel. She has a lighter alongside, a Canada bottom. On this lighter was placed a pump, which was thense to be transferred to the ALMEDA, and it is said that the lighter will also act as a disconnecter between the tug and the wreck, having a tow line to each, and the pulling to be done through her. This may be an easy way in the future to solve the international question about wrecking.
      Cleveland Herald
      November 14, 1877



      Captain Grummond, having got off the schooner ALMEDA, is going for the BEN FRANKLIN. He was to get $2,500 if her saved the ALMEDA, or no pay.
      Cleveland Herald
      November 15, 1877




INTERNATIONAL TROUBLES AT HAND. - As is well known, there has been considerable strife between American and Canadian tug owners concerning the rescuing of vessels on the shores of the respective countries. To say that the feeling has amounted to jealousy is to put it mildly. When a Canadian vessel goes ashore on the American side it boils the blood of a Briton to think that he cannot choose the tug he wishes to rescue his property, but when it happens that he cannot employ his own tug to help his own vessel, but must employ a Yankee one he fairly whoops like an Arapaho. So, when half a dozen American crafts lay themselves on the north shore of Lake Erie, for instance, and there are only two available Canadian tugs to do the rescuing, and no American tug take a hand in on pain of confiscation, Johnathan, prodded by Yankee spunk and Yankee interest, swears by the great American eagle that such things shall not be, not by a long shot, chain shot, or any other shot.
Thus the trouble has been brewing all season, until now it appears that a culmination is at hand. The schooner ALMEDA, as already reported in the Post and Tribune, was driven ashore last week near New Glasgow, on the Canadian shore of Lake Erie, while loading lumber lost by a wreck some two weeks previous. She is owned in Buffalo, we believe, and to attempt rescuing her was very tempting to tug owners hereabout. But would they dare do it in the face of repeated refusals from the authorities at Ottawa to allow American tugs to wreck in Canadian waters, and the same kind of decisions from Washington in regard to Canadian tugs?
This question got a practical answer on Friday night, when the tug Winslow, as was reported exclusively in the Post and Tribune, started out on a wrecking expedition under sealed orders. On Saturday it leaked out that the expedition was for the purpose of rescuing the schooner ALMEDA, ashore at New Glasgow, on the Canadian shore of Lake Erie. Here is boldness for you. The British Lion defied on his own homestead! The appearance of the WINSLOW at New Glasgow was telegraphed to various tug owners on the other side, and they in turn applied to Ottawa for protection from what they regard as equivalent to invasion. The Ottawa authorities promptly took the case in hand and during the afternoon a Canadian officer left Port Stanley on the tug Parker armed with the proper documents, to seize the WINSLOW. This was the latest phase of the matter up to Saturday evening.
The Winslow's crew, it was learned in Detroit, do not propose to let their boat be seized, and will only be driven from working at the ALMEDA by superior force. If force is used they are to use force in return, so that we have the starting of a nice little border warfare right at our doors. The progress of things will be watched with intense interest, but it is to be hoped that reasonable counsels will prevail and only a test case come out of the new
construction of international law bearing on wrecking. The Canadian tug men, it may be stated, however, have got their bristles up, and sustained by repeated assurances from Ottawa that they will be protected in their rights, they are hopeful of driving the American tugs away, no matter at what cost or by what means.
      Detroit Post and Tribune
      Mon., Nov. 12, 1877




PEACE ASSURED. - The expedition from this city to rescue the schooner Almeda, ashore near New Glasgow, on the Canada side of Lake Erie, is likely to end quietly after all. The owner of the Winslow disclaims any intention to violate the laws of Canada or offend the authorities in any particular. Whether it is against the law to rescue a vessel in distress on a foreign shore is still a mooted question. In this case, however, we learn that the American tug will not come in contact with the wrecked vessel. She had a lighter along, a Canadian bottom. On this lighter was placed the pump, which was then to be transferred to the ALMEDA, and it is said that the lighter will also act as a disconnector between the tug and the wreck, having a tow-line to each, and the pulling will be done through her. This may be an easy way in the future to solve the international question about wrecking, leaving the business open to fair competition and rendering futile the tight-faced construction which has recently been given the law, if indeed there be any law to authorize the conduct which officials on both sides of the line have in various instances exhibited.
      Detroit Post and Tribune
      Nov. 14, 1877



A CANADIAN GUNBOAT TO BE FITTED OUT IMMEDIATELY. - From trustworthy sources it was learned yesterday by the POST AND TRIBUNE that a British naval officer is on the way from Ottawa to Windsor, where he will arrive soon, commissioned to charter a steamboat and fit her out as a gunboat to be kept ready for service in view of the troubles that have lately arisen on the question of American tugs wrecking in Canadian waters. The officer is to be clothed with extraordinary powers, included among which are the authority to enforce international regulations and settle recent difficulties, and the appointment of subordinates in the various custom-house districts to look after Canadian interests in the connection named. We have heretofore said that Canadian tug owners had been promised the protection they asked from the government at Ottawa, and now, if the report is correct, we shall see what we shall see.
      Detroit Post and Tribune
      Nov. 14, 1877



THE ALAMEDA IN PORT. - The tug Winslow, Capt. Matt Swain, brought to this port yesterday the schooner ALMEDA, which was up so high and dry on the beach near New Glasgow, that people could walk up to her. Her prospect of getting off was considered so hopeless that her owner abandoned her to the underwriters. There was a policy for $5,000 for total wreck on her. The Winslow contracted to take her off for $2,500 or no pay, if rescued to be delivered in Buffalo. In three days the Winslow had her afloat. Then the wind was unfavorable for going to Buffalo and the craft was, with consent of the agent of the underwriters, who accompanied the expedition, brought to Detroit. She is a sorry-looking boat, and as she was insured for total loss and it cost $1,500 to get her afloat, it is likely to be unfortunate for the owner. Some very strong pulling was required at the ALMEDA, but the Winslow and Capt. Swain were equal to the emergency.
      Detroit Post and Tribune
      Nov. 14, 1877
     

Schooner ALMEDA. U. S. No. 313. Of 216.10 tons. Home port, Buffalo, N.Y.
      Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1871
     
     






















Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: nil
Remarks: Got off
Date of Original:
1877
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.18634
Language of Item:
English
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 42.2975 Longitude: -81.888611
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Almeda (Schooner), U313, aground, 4 Nov 1877