The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Mary Booth (Schooner), U16392, sunk, 7 Nov 1877


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A special dispatch to the Free Press from Montague, Mich., November 8th, says: The schooner MARY BOOTH foundered off Milwaukee Tuesday afternoon. The boat with the crew was driven across Lake Michigan, and reached here with the crew exhausted and chilled. The BOOTH was built by Bidwell & Banta, of Buffalo, and launched in May, 1857. She was of scow bottom, of 131 tons burden, valued at $2,000, rated B 2, and owned by Curtiss, of Chicago.
      Cleveland Herald
      November 10, 1877



Captain Baker, of the schooner MARY BOOTH, in a detailed statement of his experience in the storm of Monday last, which he furnishes us, says that the BOOTH was water-logged when the crew left her in the small boat, and that she rolled over shortly afterward. The crew were in the boat forty-eight hours, in a terrible sea and biting atmosphere, but finally made the land at White Lake. They had been without food or sleep for two days before abandoning the vessel, and their condition when they landed was terrible. Not one of them could have held out three hours longer. The mate, John Beleler, had his feet frozen, and the limbs of all the men were badly swollen. All were exhausted and almost ready to lie down and die. Humane people furnished them with food and lodgings, and the next day the captain applied to the railroad authorities for passes home, explaining the circumstances. Passes were refused, however, and the captain got his men on different vessels coming here, and worked his own passage over. Though very sick from the terrible experience he had gone through, he had to sleep in the forecastle, on the floor, without any covering. The names of the crew, who, together with the captain, lost everything except what clothes they had on, are; John Kurt, cook; George Hoose; Andrew Linnman; John Campbell, and one whose name is not known.
      Cleveland Herald
      November 14, 1877



Captain Baker, of the schooner MARY BOOTH, in a detailed statement of his experience in the storm of Monday last, which he furnishes us, says that the BOOTH was water-logged when the crew left her in the small boat, and that she rolled over shortly afterward. The crew were in the boat forty-eight hours, in a terrible sea and biting atmosphere, but finally made the land at White Lake. They had been without food or sleep for two days before abandoning the vessel, and their condition when they landed was terrible. Not one of them could have held out three hours longer.
      Port Huron Daily Times
      Wednesday, November 14, 1877
     
     
     
Schooner MARY BOOTH. U. S. No. 16392. Of 131.78 tons. Home port, Chicago, Ill.
      Merchant vessel List, U. S., 1871
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk
Lives: nil
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1877
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.18645
Language of Item:
English
  • Wisconsin, United States
    Latitude: 43.0389 Longitude: -87.90647
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Mary Booth (Schooner), U16392, sunk, 7 Nov 1877