The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Fontana (Schooner), U120713, sunk by collision, 4 Aug 1900


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      ONE MAN WAS DROWNED
      Big Schooner FONTANA Sunk by the Schooner SANTIAGO Yesterday
      UNFORTUNATE VESSEL IS RIGHT IN THE CHANNEL, OFF FORT GRATIOT.
      Port Huron, Mich., Aug. 4. - The barge SANTIAGO , in tow of the steamer APPOMATTOX collided with and sank the barge FONTANA, in tow of the steamer CALIYUGA in the St. Clair River early this morning. The collision occurred opposite Fort Gratiot lighthouse, at a point where the channel is narrow and up and down boats are obliged to pass close together.
      One life was lost, John McGregor, who shipped on the FONTANA at Erie, Pa., two months ago, was asleep in the vessel's forecastle when the collision occurred. The FONTANA sank bow first and he had no chance to escape.
      The APPOMATTOX and SANTIAGO were bound up and the CALIYUGA and FONTANA were bound down. A light fog prevailed. The steamers passed each other safely, but the SANTIAGO sheered into the FONTANA and struck her forward, making a big hole in the latter's bow. The FONTANA sank in a few minutes, bow first. Her cabin and stern are out of water.
      The members of the crew, except McGregor, were on deck, and they barely managed to get into the yawl boat before the FONTANA plunged to the bottom of the river. They lost all of their personal belongings. Capt. George McCoy was in charge of the FONTANA, while Capt. Frank Hebner commanded the SANTIAGO. The APPOMATTOX and her consort immediately came to anchor and lay by the wreck all night.
      The officers and crew of all four boats positively refuse to talk about the collision.
      The schooner FONTANA is owned by the Cleveland Cliffs Iron Co., of Cleveland O. She is 231 feet long; 39 feet beam, net tonnage 1,105 . E.C. Recor, of St. Clair, one of the stockholders of the Cleveland Cliffs Iron Co., says the FONTANA will be raised at once. The FONTANA had good contracts for iron ore from Marquette to Ohio ports. She is fully insured. Mr. Recor says the collision occurred by reason of the boat taking a sheer.
      When the schooner sank, her cargo of iron ore apparently shifted forward. Her bow is on the bottom in 50 feet of water, and she apparently stands straight up, her stem being so high that her cabin is above water.
      The wreck lies on the Canadian side of the river with the stern heading northwest, about 1,000 feet from the light. A channel is left on the American side for boats to run through, but steamers must not try to pass each other at this spot. The wrecking job will be very difficult, as the current runs at the rate of five miles an hour. It is possible that the FONTANA will meet the same fate as the schooner M.E. TREMBLE, which was sunk several years ago. This wreck was blown up with dynamite to get it out of the way.
      As is generally the case in river collisions, there is a third boat in the case. It is said that the steamer INTER OCEAN was passing at the time, and the suction from the craft caused the SANTIAGO to take a sheer on the end of her tow line. The damage to the SANTIAGO is not known. Her stem was somewhat broken, and she is said to be leaking. She proceeded on her way this morning, however. A light will be maintained on the FONTANA by the Kendall marine bureau and a watchman as well to warn passing boats
      Also
      Cleveland, August 4. -- The schooner FONTANA, which was sunk this morning near Port Huron, was insured through Mather & Co., of Philadelphia. The risk was placed with foreign companies.
      Also
Port Huron, August 4. -- It has not yet been determined what to do with the sunken boat. Representatives of the owners and insurance companies will meet here tomorrow morning at 8 o'clock to decide the matter.
      Detroit Free Press
      August 4, 1900


      FATAL COLLISION IN St. CLAIR RIVER.
      Port Huron, Mich., Aug. 4. - The barge SANTIAGO , in tow of the steamer APPOMATTOX collided with and sank the steamer (sic) FONTANA, in tow of the steamer CALIYUGA in the St. Clair River early this morning. The collision occurred opposite Fort Gratiot lighthouse, at a point where the channel is narrow and up and down boats are obliged to pass close together.
      One life was lost, John McGregor, who shipped on the FONTANA at Erie, Pa., two months ago, was asleep in the forecastle when the collision occurred. The FONTANA sank bow first and he had no chance to escape.
      The APPOMATTOX and SANTIAGO were bound up and the CALIYUGA and FONTANA were bound down. A light fog prevailed. The steamers passed each other safely, but the SANTIAGO sheered into the FONTANA and struck her forward, making a big hole in the latter's bow. The FONTANA sank in a few minutes, bow first. Her cabin and stern are out of water.
      The members of the crew, excepting McGregor, were on deck, and they barely managed to get into the yawl boat before the FONTANA plunged to the bottom of the river. They lost all of their personal belongings. Capt. George McCoy was in charge of the FONTANA, while Capt. Frank Hebner commanded the SANTIAGO. The APPOMATTOX and her consort immediately came to anchor and lay by the wreck all night.
      The officers and crew of all four boats positively refuse to talk about the collision.
      Marine men had been looking for a third disastrous collision in the channel between Lake Huron and Lake Erie, as all marine disasters come in cycles of three each.
      The schooner FONTANA is owned by the Cleveland Cliffs Iron Co., of Cleveland, O. She was built in 1888. She is 231 feet long, 39 feet beam, net tonnage, 1,105.
      Saginaw Courier-Herald
      August 5, 1900


      AGROUND ON THE FONTANA WRECK.
      Schooner KINGFISHER Did Much Damage To Sunken Boat.
      LATTER LIES IN A VERY DANGEROUS POSITION
      WRECKING MEN ARE LOOKING OVER THE SITUATION.
Port Huron, August 5, -- The schooner KINGFISHER, a consort of the steamer SAMUEL MARSHALL, collided with the wreck of the schooner FONTANA in the channel at Fort Gratiot and went aground on it. The FONTANA's foremast and maintop were carried away by the KINGFISHER and much damage was done.
      The stern of the FONTANA is almost in the middle of the river and it will be a miricle if some down bound boat does not collide with it. The KINGFISHER was released by the tug BROCKWAY, and the MARSHALL, after several hour's work and left in tow of the steamer, apparently little damaged. The KINGFISHER was the second barge of the tow. The manager of the McMorran Wrecking Company was up today looking over the wreck with a view to making a bid for the job of raising the boat. The current is very rapid there and the task will be a heavy one.
      Detroit Free Press
      August 6, 1900



Port Huron, Mich., Aug. 6. -- The schooner KINGFISHER in tow of the steamer SAMUEL MARSHALL, collided with the wreck of the schooner FONTANA, which lies in the channel off Fort Gratiot. The FONTANA's foremast and maintop weres carried away by the KINGFISHER, and much damage was done. The stern of the FONTANA lies almost in the middle of the river and it will be a miricle if some down bound boat does not collide with it. The KINGFISHER was released by the tug BROCKWAY and the MARSHALL, after severl hours' work, and left in tow of the steamer, apparently but little damaged.
      Saginaw Courier-Herald
      August 7, 1900

      . . . . .

      The schooner KINGFISHER in tow of the steamer SAMUEL MARSHALL, collided on Monday with the wreck of the schooner FONTANA, which lies in the channel of Fort Gratiot. The FONTANA's foremast was carried away by the KINGFISHER, and other damage was done. The stern of the FONTANA lies almost in the middle of the river. Wrecking masters from Detroit and Port Huron are practically agreed that they do not want the job of raising her. And by reason of her location, she can hardly be raised except, perhaps, with pontoons. She lies just at the entrance to the rapids, a little to the Canadian side of the center of the channel, and some 200 feet below the lighthouse. Boats steering on the ranges will hit her. Boats having tows coming down stream are in constant danger of being thrown upon the wreck.
      ALSO
      The owners of the sunken schooner FONTANA are taking all precautions to avoid another accident. Light are placed on both her spars at night and men with torches and a megaphone are stationed on the wreck. It is not definately decided what disposition will be made of her, she may be destroyed with dynamite. Marine Record
      August 9, 1900

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The wreck of the schooner FONTANA lies entirely in American waters and about 100 feet to the westward of the boundry line. The schoonerwas in collision with the schooner SANTIAGO on August 3.
      Port Huron Daily Times
      Thursday, August 9, 1900
     

      Capt. G. H. Sinclair, who represents the underwriters interests in the FONTANA, says that as divers will be unable to patch the hole in the FONTANA from the outside, some of the ore cargo will be removed and patching from the inside resorted to..
      Marine Record
      August 16, 1900

      . . . . .

Two black spar buoys have been placed on the westerly edge of the channel in the St. Clair River, to mark the 20 foot curve between the wreck of the schooner FONTANA and the west bank of the river. The shortest distance between the Fontana and this curve is about 500 feet and vessels will find 20 feet and over between the wreck and the line marked by the two spar buoys referred to. The most northerly buoy is about 450 feet due west from Fort Gratiot Light-house, and the second buoy is about 500 feet due south of the angle making out from the Grand Trunk Car Works.
      Marine Review
      August 16, 1900
     
      . . . . .

      INTER-OCEAN SEIZED
      ALLEGED SHE CAUSED THE SANTIAGO TO SHEER INTO THE FONTANA
      APPOMATTOX AND SANTIAGO WILL ALSO BE SUED FOR DAMAGES.
      Total Amount Claimed Is $90,698, That On Hull $60,000.
The steamer INTER-OCEAN was libeled and seized by a United States marshal at Port Huron yesterday morning, and may not be able to get away on her trip until tonight. The seizure proceedings were conducted by Messrs. Shaw & Cady, admiralty lawyers of this city, acting for Hoyt, Dustin & Kelly, attorneys for the St. Clair Steamship Company, owners of the schooner FONTANA, sunk near the Fort Gratiot light, at the entrance to the St. Clair River. William G. Mather, of Cleveland, is president and managing owner of this company, which is one of several lake transportation companies whose vessels are controlled by the Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company, of Cleveland. The old wooden steamer INTER-OCEAN is owned by Capt. Peter Wex of Buffalo, who commanded her, and Henry W. Wilson, of Buffalo, who acts as her shore manager.
The owners of the FONTANA charge this steamer with being partly to blame for her sinking. She must remain in port, until she can be appraised and a bond arranged for her release, and her manager will be in Detroit today for the latter purpose. The appraisement is necessary because of doubt that her value, beyond which she is not liable, will be sufficient to cover her share of the damages claimed by the FONTANA's owners, $90,698. The doubt is well founded for the Inland Lloyds register for this year gives her value as $20,000. She is 27 years old.
      The INTER-OCEAN is one of three charged with the blame. The others are the wooden schooner SANTIAGO, which struck the FONTANA, and the wooden steamer APPOMATTOX, which had her in tow at the time. These two latter are owned by the Boston Coal Dock & Wharf Co., of which Pickands, Mather & Co., of Cleveland, are the managers. The Boston Company is one of the many branches of the Hocking Valley coal and railroad system. The APPOMATTOX was built by Davidson at West Bay City four years ago, registers 2,643 gross tons, rates A1 Star, and is worth $120,000. Her consort, SANTIAGO, is but a year old, built by the same man, registers 2,600 gross tons, rates A1 Star and is valued at about $100,000. As their appraisement is not necessary, their manager will simply enter an appearance and give a bond, without an hour's delay to the boats. The KALLYUGA, which had the FONTANA in tow at the time of the collision is a wooden steamer 13 years old, built at St. Clair by Langell, registers 1,941 gross tons, rates A1½ Star, and is valued at about $75,000.
      The story of the now famous disaster, as related to the lible, is quite interesting, and contains information now made public for the first time. It says that at 11 o'clock on the night of August 3, those navigating the KALLYUGA made out the lights of the APPOMATTOX and SANTIAGO. A short distance back of them, to the west, could be seen the lights of the INTER-OCEAN. When the two tows were still a mile apart the KALLYUGA blew two whistles, indicating her desire to pass to the port, or Canadian, side of the APPOMATTOX and consort, thus taking him out of the way of all three boats going up. The APPOMATTOX promptly answered. Later, to be sure of his position. The KALLYUGA the two blasts, and the APPOMATTOX did likewise. Immediately after the first signal the KALLYUGA began to pull over towards the Canadian side. At the second signal the KALLYUGA checked down with the red light of the SANTIAGO was shut out of view, when her master rang his engineer to go ahead at the usual speed. She had hardly time to attain it when she and the SANTIAGO were nearly abreast, and the latter began to sheer towards the KALLYUGA. To avoid the schooner the KALLYUGA's wheel was put hard a-starboard and she was checked down. The SANTIAGO passed the KALLYUGA's bow by twenty feet, and her starboard bow grazed the starboard quarters of the steamer, which had meantime swung her wheel hard-a-port to avoid the schooner at her stern.
      When the schooner began to sheer, the KALLYUGA's master blew a danger signal to his consort, the FONTANA. Just as the latter began to swing to port, in obedience to the signal, she was struck at the bluff of the starboard bow by the SANTIAGO, which it id alleged was travelling seven miles an hour, when the FONTANA was going at the rate of six.
      The most interesting point of the whole story relates to the part played by the INTER-OCEAN. It is charged that she was but a short distance from the SANTIAGO, at the time of the collision, and trying to pass the latter, but a current setting partly crosswise "walled" up the water between her and the SANTIAGO, and that this current was of such volume and power as to cause the big schooner to sheer, and that once she began to sheer her rudder had little, if any control of her. The usual allegations of poor seamanship, negligence of lookouts, etc, are charged against the three by the FONTANA.
      The damages claimed are as follows: Loss on hull of FONTANA, $60,000 Loss on cargo, $12,446; On charter, which was for the season at $1 10 on ? from Marquette and Presque Isle to Lake Erie ports $15,000; For freight of the trip $2,852; on crew's effects $400: Total $90,693.
      Detroit Free Press
      August 22, 1900










     
      STORY OF THE FONTANA ACCIDENT
Libel proceedings against the steamer Inter Ocean on account of the sinking recently of the Cleveland schooner Fontana in the St. Clair River tells the story of the accident from the standpoint of the owners of the FONTANA. A different story will of course, be told by those interested in the other vessels that are involved in the matter.
      Owners of the FONTANA claim damages aggregating $90,698, this includes vessel, cargo and loss on account of the vessel's season charter. The libel states that at 11 o'clock on the night of Aug. 3, those navigating the KALIYUGA made out the lights of the APPOMATTOX, and SANTIAGO. A short distance back of them, to the west, could be seen the lights of the INTER OCEAN. When the two tows were still a mile apart the KALIYUGA blew two whistles, indicating her disire to pass to the port, or Canadian side of the APPOMATTOX and consort, thus moving out of the way of all three boats going up. The APPOMATTOX promptly answered. Later to be sure of his position the KALIYUGA's master repeated the two blasts, and the APPOMATTOIX did likewise, Immediately after the first signal the KALIYUGA began to pull over to the Canadian side. At the second signal the KALIYUGA checked down until the red light of the SANTIAGO was shut out of view, when her master rang his engineer to go ahead at the usual speed. She had hardly time to aattain it when she and the SANTIAGO were nearly abreast, and the latter began to sheer towards the KALIYUGA. To avoid the schooner the KALIYUGA's wheel was put hard a-starboard and she was checked down. The SANTIAGO passed the KALIYUGA's bow by 20 feet, and her starboard bow grazed the starboard quarter of the steamer, which had meantime swung her wheel hard a-port to avoid the schooner at her stern. When the schooner began to sheer the KALIYUGA's master blew a danger signal to his consort the FONTANA. Just as the aatter began to swing to port, in obedience to the signal, she was struck at the bluff of the starboard bow by the SANTIAGO, which it is alleged was travelling seven miles an hour, while the FONTANA was going at the rate of six. The charge as regards the INTER OCEAN is that she was but a short distance from the SANTIAGO at the time of the collision, and trying to pass the latter; that a current setting partly crosswise "walled" up the water between her and the SANTIAGO and that this current was of such volume and power as to cause the big schooner to sheer, and that once she began to sheer her rudder had little if any control of her.
      Marine Review
      August 23, 1900
      (Photo of the sunken Fontana in the article.)

      . . . . .

      Messrs. James Ryan & Sons on Monday made out a bond of $20,000 to secure the release of the steamer INTER OCEAN which has been libeled for being concerned in the sinking of the schooner FONTANA.
      Marine Record
      August 30, 1900
     
      . . . . .
     
Persons interested in the wreck of the FONTANA have recently advertised for bids for her sale in the position in which she now lies opposite Gratiot Light, St. Clair River.
      Marine Record
      September 6, 1900

      . . . . .
     
      The wreck of the schooner FONTANA which lies in the center of the channel near Fort Gratiot, is getting to be a harder wrecking job every day. Since she went to the bottom she has settled steadily and during the last few days has gone down over two feet. In a short time nothing will be seen above the surface of the river.
      Marine Record
      September 13, 1900
     
      . . . . .
     
      The wreck of the FONTANA, near Port Huron, is settling deeper into the mud. She has gone down so far now that the water is up to the top of the cabin, and in a short time will be below the surface. The wreck is a dangerous obstruction to navigation.
      Saginaw Courier-Herald
      September 19, 1900
     
      . . . . .
     
      WRECK OF THE FONTANA
The wreck of the Fontana, which is the nastiest and most dangerous that has occurred to Lake navigation in recent years, was abandoned to the Government by the underwriters during the present week. While the papers of abandonment were on their way to the Secretary of War, the wreck disappeared entirely, spars gone, with about three feet of water running over it. There was nothing to mark it's location except a ripple caused by the strong current and it became, on account of the narrow channel and current, at once the greatest menace on the lakes. Were another freighter to run into it, it would in all probibility block navigation for some time. Nothing now remains to be done but for the Government to blow up the wreck. That should be done at once. There has been some criticism of the underwriter for leaving the wreck as it is, but even their moral right of abandonment is unquestioned. The underwriters are subject for the loss of the craft, but are under no obligation to stand the additional expense of its removal when no one would bid upon raising it. It is one of the contingencies of navigation and legitimately becomes a Government charge the same as any other obstruction. When the wreck disappeared Mr. J. H. Sheadle of the Cleveland Iron Co., former owners of the craft, caused steps to be taken in the common interest of navigation to mark the location of the sunken vessel. It is expected the Government authorities will blow up the wreck at once.
      ALSO
      The foundered schooner FONTANA is now entirely under water with nothing to show her position. Both masts have been carried away by the gale. She is now one of the most dangerous wrecks that could obstruct the entrance to the St. Clair River. A small vessel with a light will be anchored over the wreck. The FONTANA has been sinking steadily since she went down after her collision with the SANTIAGO, and there is now full three feet of water over her cabin. Every precaution is needed by vessels entering the river to prevent running on the wreck.
      Marine Review
      September 20, 1900

      . . . . .
     
      The Lake Carriers Association officials have made arrangements with Kendal, of Port Huron, to light the wreck of the schooner FONTANA. Two white lights, one above the other, will be placed on the wreck. The FONTANA is now entirely under water, with nothing to show her location. Both masts were carried away by the gale. She is one of the most damgerous wrecks that could obstruct the entrance to St. Clair River.
      Saginaw Courier-Herald
      September 20, 1900
     
      . . . . .

Under the provisions of the River and Harbor act of March 3, I899 The secretary of War assumed control of the removal of the wrecked schooners FONTANA and JOHN MARTIN at the head of the St. Clair River.
      Marine Record
      September 27, 1900

      . . . . .
     
Capt. John Mitchell, as one of the Committee of the Lake Carriers appointed to investigate the subject, returned from Port Huron on Monday. Capt. Mitchell says that Co. Lydeckeff, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. is going to have the wreck of the schooner FONTANA removed, and the channel cleared as soon as possible.
      Marine Record
      September 27, 1900
     
      . . . . .
     
Under the porvisions of the River and Harbor act of March 5, 1899, the Secretary of War assumed control of the removal of the wrecked schooners FONTANA and JOHN MARTIN, at the head of St. Clair River, and the following directions must be strictly observed by all vessels approaching and passing the locality: Steamers with more than one schooner in tow, will be required to take a tug to assist in passing the wrecks or break up. Boats will not be allowed to meet or pass other within one-half mile of the wrecks, downbound boats having the right-of-way. downbound boats will not be permitted to pass the wrecks at night. Boats arriving at the light-ship after 5:3O o'clock standard time, will come to anchor above the lightship, leaving a clear passage for upbound craft; and thereafter boats will arrange
themselves in order of their arrival. A boat will not pass another at anchor below her. At daylight boats will pass down the river in order of their arrival at the anchorage ground, down boats having continuous right of way until the entire fleet has passed.
The following sailing directions will apply to downbound craft -- Keep to westward of Fort Gratiot range to pass clear of FONTANA, and when abreast of her head on to the Bottsford Elevator. In all cases up-bound boats will check and wait below Fort Gratiot front range light for any downbound boats below the lightship to pass.
Downbound boats which are not allowed to pass at all during the night, will have the right of way in the morning until the fleet has passed down, and upbound boats, must stay below Fort Gratiot front range light until notified that downbound fleet has passed, when they will proceed in order of their arrival. Sailing directions for upbound boats: Keep on Fort Gratiot range until abreast of the MARTIN, then starboard to pass clear of the FONTANA and head on the lightship. The black buoy opposite the lighthouse marks the limit of the 20 feet depth, and all vessels may safely lay a direct course from this buoy to the lightship. The upbound passage is passable to the east of the FONTANA if boats keep well to the eastward, where deep water will be found close to the Canadian shore in the immediate vicinity of the wrecks. This course is necessary because of the strong current setting from the Canadian shore towards the FONTANA. United States patrol tugs are stationed above and below, and such further instructions as may be communivated from them must be observed.
      Marine Record
      September 27, 1900

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In removing the sunken schooner FONTANA, at Port Huron, M. Sullivan of this city, who has the contract, will use the dredge GLADIATOR the tug COLUMBIA and a steam derrick. The divers will be enabled to work within a cage constructed on and sliding with the big spud anghors of the dredge which will prevent all danger of being washed away or getting the lines mixed in the swift current. An attempt will be made to pick up some of the iron ore which formed the FONTANA's cargo.
      Marine Record
      October 4, 1900
     
      . . . . .

Col. Lydecker, United States Engineer, opened bids on Tuesday for the removal of the wrecked schooner FONTANA. The contract was awarded to M. Sullivan, of this City, whose bid of $7,000 was the lowest. Mr. Sullivan is the well known contractor, formerly of the firm of Sullivan & Dunbar. Mr. Sullivan expects to have the wreck fully removed within 10 days. Safe navigation over the wreck of the schooner MARTIN is now assured and Col. Lydecker authorized the removal of all mandatory regulations concerning the passage of boats past the wrecks. The patrol tugs have been removed from duty and vessels may pass as they did before the JOHN MARTIN was sunk. In order that no further accidents may occur, masters are cautioned against meeting or passing other vessel in the immediate vicinity of the FONTANA ---- Detroit Report
      Marine Record
      October 4, I9OO (part)

      . . . . .
     
      The contract for removing the wreck of the FONTANA at Port Huron has been let to Mr. Sullivan, of Detroit, and work will begin at once. Capt. Sullivan will receive $7,000 for doing the work. The unsuccessful bidders were: Harris W. Baker, of Detroit, $8,400, and James Ried and Sons, of Bay City, $8,000. The tug COLUMBIA and dredge GLADIATOR and a steam derrick will be used in the work. An attempt will be made to recover some of the iron ore cargo of the FONTANA.
      Saginaw Courier-herald
      October 5, 1900

      . . . . .

Work in removing the wreck of the schooner FONTANA from the channel by Government contract began on Monday and will be pushed as fast as possible. The tug COLUMBIA and dredge GLADIATOR arrived at the scene of the wreck and are now working on her.
      Marine Record
      October 11, 1900
     
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In five working days from now the wreckers expect to have the FONTANA entirely removed from the channel. The work is progressing in good shape, and the southerly winds and warm weather have been a great help. The passing boats continue to hammer away at the lightship over the sunken schooner JOHN MARTIN. It was torn away Monday and again on Tuesday evening at 10 o'clock. This has become an everyday occurence and necessitates large repairs to the scow, cable and anchor.
      Marine Record
      October 25, 1900

      . . . . .

Contractor Sullivan has begun blasting away the stern of the FONTANA From indications he will not blow up the forward part which lies in sixty feet of water, whereas the spuds of his dredge can reach down but thirty-two feet. Thus far he has not rescued any of her ore cargo, nor is he likely to.
      Marine Record
      October 18, 1900
     
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In five working days from now the wreckers expect to have the FONTANA entirely removed from the channel. The work is progressing in good order.
      Marine Record
      October 25, 1900
     
      . . . . .

Work on the wreck of the FONTANA is progressing rapidly. The wrecking contractor will be able to save some of the equipment of the schooner. It will be possible to save the big steam windlass and gear, valued at about $800, also the two anchors. It is not known when the work will be completed.
      Marine Record
      November 8, 1900

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      Wreck & Casualty Report from Sept.16 to Oct.15, 1900.
      Sept. 22, 1900 the steamer YUMA and schooner MARTIN collided at the mouth of Lake Huron, near the wreck of the schooner FONTANA, and the MARTIN sunk, carrying down 4 of her crew; estimated value of vessel $18,000; Cargo $6,OO Total value $24,OO0. Total loss.
      Marine Record
      November 8, 1900

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The establishment of a light by Canadian authorities on the shoal to the southward of Stag Island and the removal of the wreck of the FONTANA render the continuance of the red and black horizontal striped buoy on the south end of the shoal extending to the southward of Stag Island, and the two black spar buoys placed off Fort Gratiot Light station to mark the west edge of the channel opposite the wreck of the FONTANA, no longer necessary. They are therefore discontinued
      Marine Review
      November 15, 1900

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      NOTICE TO MARINERS
      St. Clair River Michigan.
      Notice is hereby given that the establishment of a light by Canadian authorities on a shoal to the southward of Stag Island and the removal of the wreck of the FONTANA render the continuance of the red and black horizontal striped buoy on the South end of this shoal extending to the Southward of Stag Island, and the two black spar buoys placed off Fort Gratiot Light station to mark the west end of the channel opposite the wreck of the FONTANA no longer necessary.They are therefore discontinued as from this date, Nov. I4. 1900
      Light House Establishment
      Marine Record
      November 15, 1900

      . . . . .
     
Witnesses sworn in the case of the St. Clair Steamship Co. Vs, the steamer APPOMATTOX and schooner SANTIAGO and the steamer INTER OCEAN for causing the wreck of the FONTANA last summer off Fort Gratiot, before Judge Swan, the plaintiffs introduced evidence to show that the SANTIAGO, which struck the FONTANA, is a hard steering boat with insufficient steering apparatus. Messers Canfield and Grey, the attorneys for the INTER OCEAN, assisted in strengthening this point, as the INTER OCEAN is dragged into the case through a charge that it was her attempt to pass the SANTIAGO which caused the whole trouble.
      Marine Record
      February 7, 1901

      . . . . .
     
The case of the St. Clair Steamship Co., against the steamer APPOMATTOX and the schooner SANTIAGO for damages resulting from the sinking of the FONTANA off Fort Gratiot last summer. The amount claimed was $90,000 and the case closed in favor of the FONTANA and against the SANTIAGO, which vessel is not worth the amount of her damages, and it is a question of how much can be realized from her.
      Marine Record
      February 21, 1901

      . . . . .
     
Schooner barge FONTANA. U. S. No. 120713. Of 1,163.65 tons gross; 1,105,47 tons net. Built St. Clair, Mich., 1888. Home port, Port Huron, Mich. 231.4 x 39.1 x 17.0
      Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1896
     
     
     
     
     

     
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk by collision
Lives: 1
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1900
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.18929
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Fontana (Schooner), U120713, sunk by collision, 4 Aug 1900