The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Lottie Cooper (Schooner), U140185, aground, 9 Apr 1894


Description
Full Text

April 9 - Dragged ashore at Sheboygan and wrecked. On April 9, 1894, she was capsized and wrecked while at anchor at Sheboygan, WI. One man was lost trying to get ashore on a raft and five were taken off by life saving crew. She had a cargo of 230 thousand feet lumber from Advance, Michigan, to Sheboygan, her home port. "The schooner LOTTIE COOPER was wrecked just north of the harbor piers in the windstorm early Monday morning. She was from Pine Lake with a cargo of elm lumber for Matoon Manufactoring Co. This side of Centerville she sprang a leak, and on arriving here between 11 and 12 o'clock Sunday night, as she was unwieldy in handling came to off the harbor entrance. It was then found that water covered her cabin and forecastle floors, and in the high wind and sea prevailing she could not carry canvass enough to enable her to steer into the harbor. Anchor was cast, and about one o'clock it being thought unsafe to ride out the storm there, flash light signals were given for a tug to tow her in. As none responded one of the life saving crew was sent to get one started out. They were found to have no one on board and no steam up. At daylight a flag signal for a tug was given, which was soon after changed to a signal of distress and a call for service from the life station, as she was dragging her anchor and moving shoreward north of the harbor entrance. The life crew promptly responded, but before they could reach the vessel it capsized with her crew clinging to the mast and rigging. The tug Sheboygan had been got in readiness and went out with the life boat and the crew of the wrecked schooner were all rescued and taken to the station except Edward Ellison, who was swept off on a quantity of lumber, which the heavy breakers quickly scattered and he sank and was not seen again. He was about 50 years of age, and leaves a wife and two children in Norway, whom he was hoping soon to be able, from his earnings, to bring to this country. The crew saved were Capt. Fred Lorenz, Mate Wm. Huhme, seamen Chas. Esbach, Angust Pegelow, and Barney Haynes, all of this city but the mate, who lives at Charlevoix, Michigan.
The vessel was owned by Capt. Ole Groh, Capt. Lorenz, W.D. Crocker, G.B. Matoon, and E.E. Pantzer, and was uninsured. She was valued at $3,500, and is considered a total loss. The lumber value is estimated at $7,000.
      Sheboygan Evening Telegraph
      April 9, 1894

      . . . . .

The schooner LOTTIE COOPER, lumber laden, went ashore near Sheboygan at 5 o'clock this morning. The life saving crew rescued all the crew except one who was swept overboard and was drowned.
      Port Huron Daily Times
      Monday, April 9, 1894

      . . . . .
     
The first life lost on the Great Lakes, for the season of 1894, was that of Edward Olson, a member of the crew of the schooner LOTTIE COOPER which was capsized off this port at 5 o'clock this morning. When the sun went down last evening, a heavy wind from the southeast began blowing, which later in the evening increased to a fierce gale, that lashed the water of Lake Michigan into an angry sea. The three masted schooner, LOTTIE COOPER, left Pine Lake, Mich., between seven and eight o'clock, Saturday evening for Sheboygan. She came to, about 50 rods south of the government piers, at eleven o'clock last night and dropped her anchor. Her torches were flashed for a tug but there was no response to the signals. A night of terror was spent on the vessel by the crew. Every huge wave that dashed over the boat drenched them to the skin. Morning dawned at last and their colors were hoisted. The companion way to the forecastle of the vessel was washed away and the bulwarks followed. She then began to fill with water and the flag was lowered to half mast, and in a few minutes, the vessel gave a lurch and keeled completely over. The crew gave a leap and sank from ten to twelve feet below the surface of the water. When then came to the surface the keel of the boat was skyward and the greater part of the cargo of lumber was caught in the rigging where the men clung to it. Edward Olson grabbed several loose boards and floated from the boat and in a short time, the men saw him lose his hold on the boards and sink from their sight. The lookout at the life saving station saw the boat careen and the crew responded with the small surf boat, but before getting to the end of the piers they had to return and take the large boat and with the assistance of the tug SHEBOYGAN, made the perilous trip to the wreck, and rescued the live men, clinging to the moving pile of lumber, returning with them, safely to port, after about half an hours work. The men were taken to the sleeping apartment at the station where their wet clothing was removed and dry ones furnished. The bodies of the men were badly bruised, from the shifting of the lumber upon which they were compelled to cling for nearly a half hour. The COOPER was command by Capt. Fred Lorenz of this city and William Huhme of Charlevoix, was firs mate. The remainder of the crew was composed of Charles Esbach, August Pegelow and Barney Haynes, all of this city. Edward Olson, the drowned man, is a Norwegian, and his wife and two children, a daughter of 16 and a boy of 12 years, still live in Norway. He was about 50 years of age and had been in this country only three years. The COOPER left this city last Wednesday on her first trip for Pine Lake , Michigan, where she loaded 230,000 feet of elm lumber for the Mattoon Mfg. Co. The cargo was valued at about $3,500 and the vessel at $7,000. The vessel is a total loss without insurance. Part of the lumber will probably be saved. A greater part of the deck load was washed away during the night. The LOTTIE COOPER was built by Trumann & Cooper at Manitowoc, in 1873 and was named after a daughter of Mr. Cooper. When wrecked she was owned by Capt. Ole Groh, Capt. Lorenz, W. D. Crocker, G.B. Mattoon and Eugene Pantzer. Much credit is due Capt. Nequette, the members of the life saving crew, Capt. Ole Groh and Capt. William Groh and the crew of the tug Sheboygan for their brave and heroic work in the saving of the lives of the live men. After the crew was picked off, the lumber parted and had the tug and life boat been five minutes later, all hands would have perished in sight of their homes. Had Olson clung to the same pile of lumber, that the remainder of the men did, his life would also have been saved. The COOPER was 242 tons burden and was in good shape, as her spars, sails and rigging were all new. A large number were attracted to the beach this morning to watch the wrecked hulk drift toward the beach. There was some trouble in finding out the correct name of the man drowned. The captain of the vessel, upon which he sailed says his name is Edward Olson, and that his family reside at Orindale, Norway. The COOPER is breaking up and washing
ashore. Olson's body has not been found.
      Sheboygan Evening Telegram
      April 9, 1894

      . . . . .

Capt. Fred Lorenz says that the published accounts of the loss of the LOTTIE COOPER did not state all of the facts of the case. He states that the vessel sprung a leak between Centerville and this port and when he came off to the piers that the water covered the forecastle and cabin floors. Her condition was such that he could not carry canvas so that she would steer to enter the harbor and that is why he came to an anchor. When he flashed his torches as long as he did, he expected that a tug would come to his relief and bring him into port. The captain and crew felt grateful to the life saving crew and the tug for effecting their rescue as they did and they also express their thanks to the Seaman's Association for the financial aid extended to them.
      Sheboygan Evening Telegram
      April 12, 1894

      . . . . .

The schooner JOSEPH DUVALL went out early this morning and an effort is being made to raise the anchors and chains of the sunken schooner LOTTIE COOPER.
      Sheboygan Evening Telegram
      April 24, 1894

      . . . . .

What was left of the hull of the wrecked schooner LOTTIE COOPER is fast breaking up and washing ashore.
      Sheboygan Evening Telegram
      May 18, 1894

      . . . . .

Matthew Carr is at work cutting a hole in the bottom of the wrecked schooner LOTTIE COOPER, to recover her hold full of lumber
      Sheboygan Evening Telegram
      May 26, 1894.

      . . . . .

The storm last night created a heavy sea on the lake. The hull of the LOTTIE COOPER was broken up and today the frame work sticks ten feet above the water. The lumber from her hold was washed on the beach and a gang of men was put at work this morning gathering it up.
      Sheboygan Evening Telegram
      June 18, 1894

      . . . . .

Schooner LOTTIE COOPER. U.S. No. 140185. Of 252.48 tons gross; 239.86 tons net. Built at Manitowoc, Wis., in 1876. Home port, Milwaukee, Wis. 131.0 x 27.0 x 9.0
      Merchant Vessel List, U.S., 1891
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: 1
Freight: lumber
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1894
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.19908
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Wisconsin, United States
    Latitude: 43.75083 Longitude: -87.71453
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
Comment on this item
Groups of Related Records
Shipwreck news
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Lottie Cooper (Schooner), U140185, aground, 9 Apr 1894