The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Olive Branch (Schooner), sunk, 30 Sep 1880


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Schooner OLIVE BRANCH; foundered between Main and False Duck's, Lake Ontario, all hands lost - Sept. 30.
      Casualty List for 1880
      Toronto Globe
      November 30, 1880

      . . . . .

      Considerable commotion was caused last evening on the report going currency that a schooner had been lost and that her final plunge had been seen by captains of other craft, who were so far off, however, as to be incapable of giving a correct description of the unfortunate vessel or lending their assistance. She is stated to have been seen between the Ducks, a fore-and-after, the only canvas being carried being part of the fore-sail and a jib. The sea yesterday was very heavy, and the vessel seems to have labored a great deal, and been in much distress. It is not definitely known how she foundered, whether she capsized or filled with water and sank. The masters of the HURON, FITZHUGH and AUGUSTA all brought the information to port that en route hither they saw a schooner in the distance ahead of them, that about noon she suddenly disappeared, and that they all concluded a disaster had occurred. Their impression is confirmed by the Captain of the schooner DUDLEY, who saw the topmast of a vessel above water as she sailed down the lake for Kingston in the afternoon. Various have been the surmises, but up to the time of writing no reliable clue has been obtained respecting the name of the missing schooner or the crew, who are generally supposed to have perished. (part)
      Kingston Whig-Standard
      September 30, 1880

      . . . . .

So far no information has been received respecting the vessel disaster which has been the principal subject of discussion in Marine circles since it took place. It has been suggested that the unfortunate craft was the schooner OLIVE BRANCH which left Oswego on Wednesday morning at 6 o'clock for Portsmouth, laden with coal. She should have reached her destination on the same evening, provided no mishap occurred, which is now feared. The accident occurred about two miles north-west of the Main Ducks. The Captain of the schooner DUDLEY states that he noticed the taut and painted spars, from the peak of one of which floated a Union Jack. The Captain of the schooner HURON saw the vessel sink. He was watching her through a marine glass. She seemed to be in the trough of the sea and to have rolled over before disappearing. The missing craft may not be the OLIVE BRANCH - it is hoped not. Captain Aull was master of the vessel and also part owner with Mr. 0ldrieve. She was classed B I and valued at $3,000. Her crew was composed of three others, two Frenchmen and an Oswegoan.
Captain McLeod, of the 8chooner"C.B. Sloan" told a Whig reporter that he passed a wrecked vessel about four miles North West of the Main Duck Island, he thought. He said her spars were sticking out of the water, she had a "Fly". He could see the end of the wrecked vessels jibboom. He passed within a stone's throw of the vessel.
The OLIVE BRANCH was not insured..
      The Kingston Whig
      October 1, 1880

      . . . . .

      With regard to the OLIVE BRANCH no further information has been ascertained, and the persons who know the crew gloomily shake their heads and say " she may have went down." On board there were six persons, three men and the cook. No tug has as yet gone to the scene of the disaster at the Ducks.
      The part owners of the OLIVE BRANCH, Messrs. Oldrieve and Horn, believe that the vessel is sunk. There is only one hope - that the schooner is lying in some port on the American side. Oswego marine men have heard nothing about her. The parties supposed to be lost are Capt. Aull, of Kingston; Mrs. Menerva Jarvis, Belleville, cook; two Frenchmen, and an Oswego sailor. The vessel had been insured, but the policy expired on the 15th September. Messrs. Oldrieve and Horn had ordered her reinsurance, but the older does not seem to have been carried out. The vessel was about nine years old, and was built by Mr. Redman, of Picton
      Kingston Whig-Standard
      Saturday, October 2, 1880

      . . . . .

The Ducks Disaster. -- The schooner OCEAN WAVE is all right. She has been lying at MacDonald's Cove. The only vessel reported to have been lost and that has not yet been reported is the OLIVE BRANCH. Yesterday the tug FRANKLIN made a trip up the lake, but could go no further than Simcoe Island. The Captain of the schooner H.P. MURRAY saw the topmast and fly of the sunken schooner at the Ducks, a description of which corresponds with that of the OLIVE BRANCH.
      Kingston Whig-Standard
      Monday, October 4, 1880

      . . . . .

      The schooner WANDERER left Oswego on Friday for Belleville, and had a very rough passage. The crew saw the topmast of a schooner above the water on Hennessy's shoal, near the Ducks. From the distance between her spars she was though to be larger than the OLIVE BRANCH.
      Kingston Whig-Standard
      Tuesday, October 5, 1880

      . . . . .

      No tidings have been heard from the schooner OLIVE BRANCH as yet. It is proven conclusively that the vessel has gone down at the Ducks. Vessels from Kingston have been unable to go out to the sunken craft on account of heavy seas outside.
      Kingston Whig-Standard
      Tuesday, October 5, 1880

      . . . . .
     
Kingston Whig. -- Considerable commotion was caused last evening on the report gaining currency that a schooner had been lost and that her final plunge had been seen by the captains of three other crafts, who were so far off, however, as to be incapable of giving a correct description of the unfortunate vessel or lending their assistance, She is stated to have been seen between the Ducks, a fore-and -after, the only canvas carried being a part of the foresail and jib. The sea yesterday was very heavy, and the vessel seems to have labored a great deal, and been in much distress. It is not definitely known how she foundered whether she capsized or filled with water and sank. The masters of the Huron, Fitzhugh and Augusta all brought the information to port that en-route hither they saw a schooner in the distance ahead of them, that about noon she suddenly disappeared, and that they all concluded a disaster had occurred Their impression is confirmed by the captain of the schooner Dudley. Who saw the topmast of a vessel above water as he sailed down the lake for Kingston in the afternoon.
      Oswego Palladium
      Saturday. October 2, 1880
     

      The Missing Vessel.
Nothing further transpires relative to the vessel capsized off the Ducks, and it appears quite certain that she is the OLIVE BRANCH of Kingston. A despatch from Sackets to-day says: Fishermen arrived here this morning from the Duck Islands report that it was the schooner OCEAN WAVE that capsized near the islands. All hands were lost." This is incorrect, of course, the OCEAN WAVE having been here yesterday. The owners of the OLIVE BRANCH have given her up as lost. Her crew consisted of Andrew Aull, captain, three French sailors, names not known, and Mrs. Minnie Jarvis of Belleville, cook.
The policy of the hull expires Sept. 15.
      Oswego Palladium
      Tuesday October 5, 1880.

      . . . . .

THE OLIVE BRANCH. -- Capt. Dix of the WHITE OAK, enroute to Kingston, lowered a boat and approached the mast of the sunken vessel at the Ducks. The fly was secured, brought to the city and submitted to the inspection of Mrs. Capt. McKee who made it. She believes it belongs to the OLIVE BRANCH. Suspicions have thus been confirmed almost beyond a doubt. Capt. Dix says the vessel lies about two miles from Timber Island, in about 70 feet of water. Her bow is about eight or ten feet higher than her stern. She is on a sloping shoal. Had she sailed a mile nearer the city, she would have survived the storm, or at least the crew would have been saved. All hands must have been on deck at the time of the disaster and their bodies will probably rise today or tomorrow.
      Rev. John Aull, of Raths, a brother of the unfortunate Captain, has written to a citizen asking for particulars of the accident. The Captain had four brothers and two sisters.
      It is hardly probable that the vessel will be raised. Some vessel coming along the lake in the night will break off the spars and that will be the end of her.
      Kingston Whig-Standard
      Friday, October 8, 1880

      . . . . .

      It is thought that the schooner OLIVE BRANCH, which was sunk on Hennessy's Shoal, has gone to pieces, as pieces of wreckage supposed to have been from her came ashore near Indian Point.
      Kingston Whig-Standard
      November 18, 1880

      . . . . .

OLIVE BRANCH, schooner of 121 tons register, bound from Oswego to Kingston foundered in heavy weather half way between the False and the Main Duck Islands, a total loss, which was valued at $3,600. She was registered at the port of Picton and was 9 years old at the time.
      Statement of Wreck & Casualties for I880
      Dept. of Marine & Fisheries

      . . . .

      Port Of Picton Vessel Register
      Register Number - 38
      Name : OLIVE BRANCH
      Description : Schooner
      Tonnage : 121 tons.
      When Built : 1871
      Where Built : Picton
      Masters Name : Thomas J. Wellbanks
      Builders Name & Data of Certificate: Wm. Redmond, Oct. 27, 1871
      Description of Vessel : -
      Length : 92 feet and 4 inches
      Breadth : 22 feet (above wales)
      Depth of Hold : 8 feet
      Masts : Two
      Stern : Square
      Bowsprit : Standing
      How Built : Carvel
      How Rigged : Schooner
      Figure-head : None
      Decks : One

Subscribing owners :-Walter Ross of Picton sole owner, sold to Thomas Wellbanks & Thomas Wellbanks Jnr., a half share in the vessel between them, all 64 shares were sold to Joseph Dix of Garden Island dated Feb. 29, I872, who sold on March 8, I873 to Christopher Harris of Storrington who sold a half share in the vessel to Andrew Aull of Kingston dated April 18, 1876
      Notations :- Carried to new book

      . . . . .

      from Port of Picton Book of Transactions.
OLIVE BRANCH : Vessel foundered 4 miles East of False Ducks Between False and Main Ducks, Lake Ontario Sept. 30, 1880. All hands lost. Register closed Dec. 31, 1880

      . . . . .

OLIVE BRANCH schooner of 160 tons (American tons), built by Redmon at Picton in I87I, owned by Ross and registered at the port of Picton, valued at $8,000 and classed A I, surveyed in Feb. I873
      Association of Canadian Lake Underwriters
      Lake Vessel Register for I873

      . . . . .

OLIVE BRANCH , schooner of 160 tons, built by Redman at Picton 1871. owned by Ross
and registered at the Port of Picton, valued at $6,000 and classed as A I, last survey -Feb. I873.
      Association of Canadian Lake Underwriters
      Lake Vessel Register for I874

      . . . . .

OLIVE BRANCH, schooner of 121 tons built 1871 at Picton and owned by Christopher Harris of Storrington, Frontenec County, Ont., a mariner 92 x 22 x 8.
      Dominion of Canada Vessel Register 1874

      . . . . .

OLIVE BRANCH, Canadian schooner of I60 tons, built Picton by Redman, Oct. 1871, and owned by Oldrieve & others, Home Port, Kingston. Valued at $4,600 Class A 2.
      Marine Insurance Classification Index, 1878


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk
Lives: all
Remarks: Total loss
Date of Original:
1880
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.20368
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Olive Branch (Schooner), sunk, 30 Sep 1880