The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
William Armstrong (Propeller), sunk, 30 Jun 1889


Description
Full Text

FERRY BOAT SUNK.
      Passenger Agent McFall Drowned Off Brockville by the Sinking of a Ferry Boat.
Montreal, July 1. - The city was shocked today by the intelligence of the drowning of Charles C. McFall, Canada passenger agent of the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, and one of the best-known and most popular railroad men in Canada, which occurred yesterday at Brockville. Mr. McFall, whose headquarters were in Montreal, left there Saturday night for Brockville on business. This morning with a friend named Hocklinger of Brockville he took the ferry steamer WILLIAM ARMSTRONG from Brockville for Morristown on the American side, and after transacting some business left on the return trip. When the ferry boat, which had three heavily loaded cars and a freight car aboard, was half way between Brockville and the American side the hold was found to be filled with water, and in less than three minutes the boat lurched over on one side and sank in 80 feet of water. In addition to Capt. Leonard and a crew of five, there were on board J. Hocklinger of Brockville; Allan Hayner, a Canadian Custom officer; John Sweeney of Brockville and McFall. All jumped into the water and were rescued by a passing steamer, with the exception of McFall, who, when last seen, was trying to get a boat from the sinking steamer. McFall had hundreds of friends in Canada and the United States and was very popular in railroad circles.
      Buffalo Evening News
      Monday, July 1, 1889



ARMSTRONG, steamer, American stern-wheel bound from Morristown to Brockville, sank at Brockville when her stern dropped out, with the loss of one life. She was a total loss, June 30, 1889
      Statement of Wreck & Casualty for 1889
      Dept. of Marine & Fisheries.

     
Mr. Leslie is not yet discouraged about the raising of the steamer ARMSTRONG. About $9,000 worth of material went down with the GASKIN which the pontoon struck, but it is recoverable. The GASKIN was condemned anyway and may be left on the bottom of the river.
      Toronto Globe
      Friday, September 20, 1889


Kingston, Sept. 20. - Mr. Leslie will resume work at the steamer ARMSTRONG. He will first lift the hull of the schooner GASKIN. He has engaged the schooner JESSIE BRECK
      Toronto GLOBE
      Saturday, September 21, 1889


Mr. Leslie will again start work at the Steamer ARMSTRONG tomorrow.
      Toronto Globe
      Tuesday, October 1, 1889


The raising of the wrecking material from the sunken barge GASKIN is going on well.
      Toronto GLOBE
      Saturday, October 12, 1889

      Owing to the strong nor'easter now blowing, work on the steamer ARIISTRONG had to be abandoned.
      Toronto Globe
      Wednesday, October 16, I889


A diver is at work today on the wreck of the ARMSTRONG.
      Toronto Globe
      Thursday, October 17, 1889


The schooner S. NEELON, now at Collins Bay will take the place of the schooner JESSIE BRECK at the wreck of the steamer ARMSTRONG.
      Toronto Globe
      Wednesday, October 23, I889


List of casualties in this vicinity include the sinking or the railway ferry steamer ARMSTRONG, between Brockville and Morristown.
      Toronto Globe
      Tuesday, October 29, 1889


The diver working on the wreck of the ARMSTRONG who had such a narrow escape from death on Thursday last, is recovering. The mishap has further delayed work.
      Toronto Globe
      Wednesday, October 30, I889


      There are three divers at work on the steamer ARMSTRONG.
      Toronto Globe
      Thursday, November 7, I889


      Brockville, November 9. ANOTHER MISFORTUNE
The wrecking schooner R. GASKIN, sunk beside the steamer ARMSTRONG, was raised today until her topmast was above the water when the hose for supplying air from the compressor to the lifting pontoon burst. Two tugs attempted to take her into shallow water, but before they made much she again settled down. The attempt to raise the ARMSTRONG has been a series of misfortunes.
      Toronto Globe
      Monday, November 11, 1889


      THE ARMSTRONG WRECK
Brockville, Nov. I4. -- The damaged Pontoon which sunk the schooner GASKIN was raised yesterday afternoon. Two pontoons are still attached to the steamer ARMSTRONG. And two more will be lowered, which, it is hoped, will bring her up.
      Toronto Globe
      Friday, November I5, I889


The tug RIVAL left tonight for Kingston with the two Pontoons damaged at the wreck of the ARMSTRONG. Another attempt will be made on Monday to raise the GASKIN.
      Toronto Globe
      Monday, November I8, I889


Brockville, Nov. 24. -- Another attempt was made yesterday to raise the schooner GASKIN. A pontoon was lowered and attached, and when it was pumped out she rose far enough to be towed into shallow water, where she now lies with her topmasts above water. She is now out of the way of the ARMSTRONG, on which operations will be resumed.
      Toronto Globe
      Monday, November 25, 1889


      The "Ogdensburg Journal" says that Mr. Leslie's contract was to raise the ferry ARMSTRONG in time for the winter's work, and he was to receive $10,000. The present abandonment releases the owners, and it is at their option whether a further contract is made. The Journal is informed that Mr. Leslie sunk at least $15,000 in the undertaking.
      The Toronto Globe
      Friday, December 27, 1889


The Brockville Recorder, says that the steamer ARMSTRONG will soon be raised and taken to the dock at Brockville if the course of operations which have begun is completed. It is now more than 12 feet from the bottom of the river and is supported by strong chains to two schooners and has been moved several feet towards the shore
      March 17, 1890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings


Fred Rail has left the wreck of the steamer ARMSTRONG for Milwaukee and a position on the schooner MERRILL
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      March 26, 1890


The vessels at the ARMSTRONG wreck stood Fridays gale well. The timbers held all right but two cables used in lashing the vessels together snapped.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      March 31, 1890



Last Thursday the smoke stack of the ARMSTRONG was in sight, work was carried on all day Sunday, and by Monday morning the hurricane deck was in sight. This deck is built of pine and is very badly smashed. Two cars full of coal were on board but the coal has all been emptied into the river. On Friday she was raised and pumping was commenced. She will probably come to this city Monday.
      March 31, I890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings



The rescue of the ARMSTRONG is not complete yet due to the storms.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      April 1, 1890


      Mr. Leslie has purchased the schooner PHILO BENNETT from Breck & Booth.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      April 2, I890


It has been decided to remove the vessels and accomplish the raising of the ARMSTRONG by driving long spiles into the river bottom, placing cross timbers and raising her by jacks. The schooners will be fitted out for the seasons business.
      Also
Samuel Mulligan, one of the wrecking hands at the steamer ARMSTRONG was badly hurt yesterday by a guy rope breaking and striking him on the face inflicting severe wounds especially over the right eye. Six stitches were needed to close the wound. He will be Mate on the NEELON.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      April 2, 1890


The ARMSTRONG was lowered last Friday. She did not reach Ogdensburg last week as reported, but thinks she will take a rest in Brockville for 3 or 4 months yet
      April 7, I990
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings


It is likely that schooners BRECK and NEELON will be towed from Brockville to the City this week. Five large timbers which was too long to be used in raising the steamer ARMSTRONG are in the NEELON and will be discharged at Collins Ray.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston )
      April 7, I890


      Louis LaLone, boss carpenter at Collins Bay has gone to Brockville to make repairs on the schooners NEELON and BRECK.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      April 8, I890


Tug McARTHUR will leave tonight for Brockville and will return to the City tomorrow with schooners NEELON and BRECK and two pontoons.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston )
      April 12, I890


On Sunday the tug McARTHUR, with the schooner JESSIE BRECK a number of large timbers and some buoys in tow arrived from Brockville. She would have brought the schooner NEELON, but as the pontoons were not in position to take away, the scheme was abandoned.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      April 15, 1890


Difficulty is being experienced in raising the sunken pontoons at Brockville owned by the Collinsby Rafting Co, and used in lifting the steamer ARMSTRONG, they are lying in 34 feet of water. Capt. Mooney says he would just as soon undertake to raise the ARMSTRONG as complete the work of raising the pontoons.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston )
      April I8, I890


      The two pontoons used in the work of raising the steamer ARMSTRONG at Brockville have been raised and are hanging on the sides of the schooner NEELON. The whole outfit will be conveyed to this city by the steamer McARTHUR.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      April 22, I890


      The masts of the sunken barge GASKIN near Brockville, have been broken off to prevent navigation being obstructed.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      April 24, I890


The final effort is being made this week to raise the ARMSTRONG wreck. The pile driver is being worked from the barge BENNETT.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      April 25, 1890


      Capt. D. H. Lyon has bought a steamer for car service between Ogdensburg and Prescott to take the place of the steamer ARMSTRONG. She is known by the name of the SOUTH EASTERN and hails from Sorel, Quebec. She is 185 feet long and carries five cars. This boat is only three years old, is staunch and seaworthy. Mr. Lyon is preparing to bring her to Ogdensburg. She will take her place on June 1st.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      April 26, 1890

      . . . . .

      TUG McARTHUR BURNED.
Kingston, Ont. April 25. -- The tug McARTHUR owned by the Collins Bay Rafting Co., burned to the water's edge this morning with $25,ooo worth of machinery, which she had just brought from the wreck of the steamer ARMSTRONG. W. Leslie is the principle owner. He lost $5,000 on his contract to raise the sunken ARMSTRONG. The boat is insured but the machinery not. The McARTHUR was worth between $15,000 and $18,000.
      Detroit Free Press
      April 26, 1890
     
      . . . . .

The cabin of the old barge BENNETT has been repaired. It was burnt out while lying at Kingston dock last Winter.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      April 30, 1890

The work of driving piles on the site of the ARMSTRONG wreck has been commenced
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      May 7, I890


      Sinking of the schooner JESSIE BRECK
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      May I7, I890

      A sketch of a Vessel
      The schooner JESSIE BRECK was owned by Breck & Booth of Kingston. She was built at Port Colborne in 1873 for her present owners. She was classed A I½ and was considered a strong and substantial boat. Two years ago she was caught in a heavy gale and had her masts taken out of her. None of the crew were lost. This is the first serious accident she has met. She never lost a man before. She was valued at $6,000 and was not insured. She was kept in excellent repairs, her owners having spent $2,200 on her last season. It is a remarkable fact that the BRECK makes the third vessel out of the four which were engaged at the wreck of the ARMSTRONG to have met with a disaster. The schooner GASKIN was sunk at Brockville by a pontoon running through her bottom; the steamer McARTHUR was burned to the waters edge at Collinsby and now the JESSIE BRECK is a wreck near Simcoe Island. It will cost between $2,000 and $3,000 to put the BRECK in seaworthy condition again. It is reported that her deck is burst open and the cabin swept away.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      May I9, I890


The frame work on the piles driven around the ARMSTRONG on which it, is calculated to raise the old boat is nearing completion and it is expected work with the hydraulic jacks will be commenced shortly. The number of jacks at present is five.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      May 30, I890



The ARMSTRONG is languishing at the C. P. R. dock in Brockville. The worst of bad luck has been the portion of this steamer since the day she went to the bottom. Capt. Lyon who owns the boat, refuses to take the boat now she is raised, claiming that the Company lost money, more than she is worth getting up. One of the schooners used in raising her was burned a day or two ago, and all things look gloomy for the poor old ARMSTRONG.
      April 28, 1890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings


Capt. Lyon has purchased a new boat named the SOUTH EASTERN at Sorel, P.Q., and will begin to ferry cars the first of June.
      May 5, I890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings


The ARMSTRONG is once more on the boards. Work has been continued and it is reported that she will be brought to Ogdensburg and placed on the dry-dock for repairs
      June 3, I890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings


      Arrangements for raising the steamer ARMSTRONG have been completed. There seems to be a brighter prospects of bringing her to the surface without mishap than ever before. The boat lies in the shallow water near the docks at Brockville. Spiles have been driven about her, three on each side at the end and three on each side at the center. Some idea of how solidly they stand can be gathered from the fact that in driving they went but ½ inch at a stroke of the I,000 pound hammer. Timbers have been placed across resting on the top of the spiles to which chains have been attached. Ten jacks are in use. If nothing occurs to mar the plans the workmen will have her riding the surface of the water in a few days.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      June 5, 1890


The stern of the steamer ARMSTRONG was raised yesterday to allow pumping. It will commence as soon as a plank in her hull is repaired, being torn off by one of the links in the chain becoming caught in it. The diver reports that her hull is in perfectly sound condition.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      June 12,1890


Steamer ARMSTRONG is now afloat. Her upper works are sadly wrecked.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      June 14, I890


      Steamer ARMS'I'RONG being afloat, Mr. Leslie has sent a letter to Capt. Lyon asking that gentleman whether he would take her to Brockville or Ogdensburg, this provision being optional, we understand, in the contract made. In the meantime she will remain where she is, the pump being used when needed to keep her afloat.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston )
      June 18, 1890


All the cross beans around the ARMSTRONG, except the one at the stern have been removed.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston )
      June 20, I890



      The steamer ARMSTRONG is afloat again and is expected here every day.
      June 23, 1890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings


      THE ARMSTRONG TROUBLE.
      Capt. Lyon Talks About The Contract Made With Capt. Leslie.
Ogdensburg Journal. -- Capt. D. H. Lyon, General manager of the Canadian Pacific Transfer Co. was in this city yesterday. In regard to the reported trouble between himself and the wrecker Leslie, he said he knew nothing except what he'd read and that their relationship so far had been friendly. He refused to say anything officially, as the company had not yet decided upon what policy would be pursued. Speaking as a private individual he said the ARMSTRONG was not fully raised and re-floated. The chain still remained under her stern and the pumps were used to a considerable extent in keeping her up. The boat was badly damaged by the process of raising which was not done by pontoons as specified in the contract purposely to avoid this. The stern has been damaged by dynamite, and it is doubtful if the boat is good for much, which can not be ascertained until she is pulled out of the water. He said he thought Mr. Leslie would very soon remove the remaining chains from under the boat. It was plain to see Mr. Lyons was very much disappointed at Mr. Leslie not raising the boat last fall as agreed. He said the people at the time were surprised at the large amount of money offered by the Company for raising her. This was done because a boat was needed to break the ice, there was not time to build a new boat, and it was represented to them that this one could be raised and made ready in time for the work.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston )
      June 27, 1890


The steamer ARMSTRONG will be removed to Ogdensburg for repairs.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      June 28, I890


      W. Leslie has been notified to deliver the steamer ARMSTRONG on the railway at Ogdensburg and the contract money will be paid, the company reserving the right to contest the case because of non-fulfillment of the contract.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      July 2, 1890


Steamer ARMSTRONG has been taken to Ogdensburg in tow of the steamer ALERT.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      July 11, 1890


      The steamer ARMSTRONG has at last put in an appearance at the Marine Railway. Last Thursday morning at 10 o'clock the news that the ARMSTRONG had arrived caused considerable excitement. Hundreds of visitors started for the shipyard, but unless they had known what boat was before them, they never would have recognized the ARMSTRONG in the unsightly mass of timber hauled up on the dry-dock. The steamer has been underwater just one year, and of course would not be expected to present a very fine appearance. The hull is not badly injured, the machinery is also in fair shape, but the cabins, decks, pilot house, and in fact all the wood work of the vessel is in ruins.
It is stated the machinery alone is worth $6,000. Capt. Lyon has decided to have the boat fitted up as a ferry for cars and heavy freight, but not as an excursion boat, as it was before. The three cars loaded with coal remained on the boat in the same position as when it sunk. They were taken off Tuesday morning and the iron rails were found to be covered with rust half an inch thick
      July 14, 1890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings


It is reported in the American papers that W. Leslie, on putting the steamer ARMSTRONG on the 'ways' at Ogdensburg received a cheque for $I0,000, the contract price for raising her.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      July 16, 1890


The woodwork of the ARMSTRONG has been all torn away, leaving only the hull. The decks are to be raised several feet higher than they formerly were. The boat is to be rebuilt very roughly as it is intended only as a ferry for cars.
      July 2I, I890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings



Steamer ARMSTRONG being repaired, probably will become a ferry between Brockville and Morristown.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      July 26, 1890


Steamer ARMSTRONG, stripped to her bottom, will be launched soon, and her repairs completed in time for winter use.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      August 16, I890


The ARMSTRONG is being rapidly repaired at the shipyard. It is expected that she will be running on her route early in the fall.
      August 16, 1890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings



The steamer ARMSTRONG will not be fitted up as an excursion boat as formerly, but will be finished roughly for cars.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      August 26, 1890


The steamer ARMSTRONG, raised from the bottom of the river last summer, and now undergoing repairs at Ogdensburg, will not be ready for the winter service until about December 1st.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      September 17, 1890


There is no particular mourning over the loss of the big barge WAHNAPITAE. She was so long and wide that she was very hard to handle, and always threatened destruction to whatever came in her way. She was, to aN extent, a demoralizer of freight rates, and as such will be missed without regret.
Nothing definite was known by the Union on Dry Dock Company about the report that the Clover Leaf Line would build three more steamers this willter. The company are well pleased with the S.C. REYNOLDS, and if, as is claimed, new connections have been arranged that will insure greater traffic, they will probably build one duplicate at least.
      Marine Review
      October 30, 1890


The steamer ARMSTRONG has undergone a complete change to her upper works. She has been raised at the bow and stern. Commodious cabins have been built amidships on both sides of the track, otherwise she is perfectly open. The boat now has two tall smokestacks instead of one as formerly . When completed she will look even better than before the wreck, and be many times safer. The carpenter work on the boat is nearly completed and painting has been commenced.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      November 1, 1890


The old burnt tug McARTHUR was brought to Davis dry-dock today. She will be docked tomorrow, for the purpose of taking out the bed-plates of the engine, shaft and all iron work.
      Daily British Whig (Kingston)
      November 10, 1890




      The ARMSTRONG is receiving the finishing touches at Hannan's dock.
      October 6, 1890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings


The steamer ARMSTRONG is rapidly nearing completion. Steam was on a few days ago and the machinery found to be in first class condition, Capt. Anderson of the BELLEVILLE will take command of the ARMSTRONC.
      November 3, I890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings


      The top of the pilot house which floated off the steamer ARMSTRONG when the boat was sunk, will be taken to Terrace Park and used as the top of a little summer house at Capt. Dave Lyon's cottage.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      November 19, 1890


The steering wheel of the steamer ROTHESAY has been put on the steamer ARMSTRONG, the steamer is nearly ready for use.
      British Daily Whig (Kingston)
      December 4, 1890


The steamer ARMSTRONG is now running on her old route between this city and Prescott.
      December 9, 1890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings


The mocking bird whistle of the steamer ARMSTRONG once more floats musically upon the breeze,
      December I5, 1890
      Lawrence County Hist. Association
      Canton, New York, Newspaper Clippings

      . . . . .

      ENROLMENT, No Two (2)
      Port of Ogdensburg, N. Y. -- Official Number 80613.

Name . . . . . . . Wm. ARMSTRONG
Type . . . . . . . Propeller
When Built . . . . 1876
Where Built . . . Ogdensburg, N. Y.

Length . . . . . . . 100 feet
Breadth . . . . . . . 30 feet
Depth . . . . . . . 6 feet

Tonnage . . . . . . One hundred and eight one and 24 one hundredths (181-24/100ths.)
      Capacity under tonnage deck . . . . 128-54/100ths.
      Capacity of enclosures on upper deck 52-70/100ths.
      Total tonnage . . . . . . . . . . . . 181-24/100ths.

Decks . . . . . . One
Stern . . . . . . Round
Head . . . . . . Plain
Present Master . David H. Lyon and sole owner
Enrolled at the Port of Ogdensburg, N. Y. in the district of Oswegatchie, April 25, 1877

      . . . . .

      ENROLMENT, No 1
      Port of Ogdensburg, N. Y. -- Official Number 80613.

Name . . . . . . . Wm. ARMSTRONG
Type . . . . . . . Propeller
When Built . . . . 1876
Where Built . . . Ogdensburg, N. Y.

Length . . . . . . . 100 feet
Breadth . . . . . . . 30 feet
Depth . . . . . . . 6 feet

Tonnage . . . . . . One hundred and eight one and 24 one hundredths (181-24/100ths.)
      Capacity under tonnage deck . . . . 128-54/100ths.
      Capacity of enclosures on upper deck 52-70/100ths.
      Total tonnage . . . . . . . . . . . . 181-24/100ths.

Decks . . . . . . One
Stern . . . . . . Round
Head . . . . . . Plain
Present Master . David H. Lyon
Sole Owner . . . . Charles Lyon
Enrolled at the Port of Ogdensburg, N. Y. district of Oswegatchie, September 13, 1879
     
Former Enrolment No 2, dated April 25, 1877 and now surrendered.

      . . . . .

      WILLIAM ARMSTRONG, Can. Reg. No. 107688. Built Ogdensburg, N. Y. in 1876. A train ferry rebuilt at barge MONS MEG in 1913.
      Prelim. List of Canadian Vessels
      1809 to 1930
     
      WILLIAM ARMSTRONG, Can. Reg. No. 107688. Built Ogdensburg, N. Y. in 1876. A train ferry rebuilt at barge MONS MEG in 1913.
      Prelim. List of Canadian Vessels
      1809 to 1930
     
      WILLIAM ARMSTRONG, Can. Reg. No. 107688. Built Ogdensburg, N. Y. in 1876. A train ferry rebuilt at barge MONS MEG in 1913.
      Prelim. List of Canadian Vessels
      1809 to 1930
     

      . . . . .


      American Certificate of Enrollment No. 10 dated April 11, 1882, for the Sts. (steam screw) Wm. ARMSTRONG of Ogdensburg, of 181 tons gross, 90 tons net, was surrendered at Ogdensburg N.Y. June 17, 1912 as she was sold foreign (Canada).

      . . . . .

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG. Can. Reg. No. I07688. Registered at the port of Prescott. Built 1876 at Ogdensburg N. Y. Length 105 feet, Breadth 31 feet, Depth 9·4 feet. 318 tons gross, 225 tons register, a 90 H. P. propeller owned by Prescott & Ogdensburg Ferry Co. of Prescott, Ontario
      Shipping Register of Canada for 1913
      Sessional Papers Vol. I6 No. 21 B 1913



      WILLIAM ARMSTRONG, Can. Reg. No. 107688. Built Ogdensburg, N. Y. in 1876. A train ferry rebuilt at barge MONS MEG in 1913.
      Prelim. List of Canadian Vessels
      1809 to 1930
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk
Lives: 1
Freight: ore cars
Remarks: Raised
Date of Original:
1889
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.21846
Language of Item:
English
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 44.58341 Longitude: -75.68264
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
Comment on this item
Groups of Related Records
Shipwreck news
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










William Armstrong (Propeller), sunk, 30 Jun 1889