The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Swallow (Propeller), U115184, sunk by collision, 5 Oct 1900


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Marine City, Mich., Oct. 5. -- The steambarge SWALLOW was sunk by an unknown steamer in St. Clair River early this morning.
      A mistake of signals caused the collision. The unknown boat kept right on her course and did not stop to ascertain the damage done.
      The crew of the SWALLOW, which was 134 feet long, valued at $10,000, and owned by Detroit people, were saved.
      Saginaw Courier-Herald
      October 6, 1900
     
      . . . . .
     
      SUNK BY AN UNKNOWN.
Marine City, October 5. -- At 4:20 o'clock this morning an unknown steel steamer ran into the steamer SWALLOW, towing the barge MANITOU, just opposite the salt block above Cherry Beach, in the St. Clair River. The SWALLOW had a hole ten feet long ripped in her starboard bow and went to the bottom by the time she could be steered to the shore.
      The SWALLOW and tow were bound down. The boats came together at full speed and the SWALLOW was struck on the starboard bow. There was great excitement aboard and the crew at once set about heading the disabled craft for the shore. They succeeded in getting in getting her as far as the channel bank, when she went down in 18 feet of water. The unknown boat kept on her course and didn't stop an instant to see what damage had been done.
      The SWALLOW was loaded with cedar posts and shingles from Muskegon and was bound for Detroit. She was a wooden boat 134 feet long, built in Trenton in 1873, and was owned by Lennane Bros., Carl Stebert and Capt. Quinlan, all of Detroit. She was valued at $10,000.
      ------
Capt. Quinlan, of the SWALLOW, says she is a total wreck, lying on the bank three miles below Marine City. The mate, M. Kinna, was in charge at the time. Quinlan says he could not make out the name of the other, but judged her to be one of the big steel craft. Just before the crush, Quinlan says, three boats were bound up, abreast, on his port side; the mate gave one blast, but the one nearest answered with two, then each repeated the original signals, and the collision came. Quinlan holds that as he was dounbound he had the right of way, and that the other, by his course, has plainly violated the government statutes governing the passage of boats in narrow channels, incorporated in what is known as the White Law. He has placed the matter in the hands of Gray & Gray, attorneys, and proposes to make a strong fight for damages. He thinks he knows the name of the other boat but is not certain. However the Port Huron local Steamboat Inspectors will be in possession of the name in a few days. The statute governing the Steamboat Inspection Service compels both masters to report at their earliest opportunity the facts of the collision to the inspectors of the local district in which it occurred, which happens to be Port Huron.
      The eleven members of the SWALLOW's crew managed to fish their effects out through a hole in the cabin roof, which is just above the water. The bow is also out of water.
      Detroit Free Press
      October 6, 1900
     
      . . . . .

The steamer SWALLOW,which went ashore near Cherry Beach early yesterday morning is a total wreck. Port Huron Local Steamboat Inspectors are endeavoring to ascertain the name of the boat which colliced with the SWALLOW.
      Port Huron Daily Times
      Saturday, October 6, 1900
     

      THE SWALLOW COLLISION.
      Capt. Quinlan of the steamer SWALLOW, which was run down by an unknown steamer two miles below Marine City early on Friday morning last, says the mate was in charge at the time. Just before the crash three steamers were bound up, abreast, on his port side; The mate gave one blast, but the one nearest answered with two, then each repeated the original signals, and the collision came. Quinlan holds that as he was downbound he had the right of way, and that the other, by his course, has plainly violated the government statutes governing the passage of boats in narrow channels, incorporated in what is known as the White Law. He has placed the matter in the hands of attorneys and proposes to make a strong fight for damages. The SWALLOW has a hole in her starboard bow 10 feet long and Capt. Quinlan pronounces her a total loss. She is owned by Lennane Bros., Carl Slebert and Capt. Quinlan, all of Detroit. They value her at $10,000.
      A dispatch from Port Huron states that without a doubt it was the Rockefeller steamer SIEMENS that collided with the steamer SWALLOW near Marine City Friday morning. The Swallow's deckload of shingles and cedar posts is being removed.
      Detroit Free Press
      October 8, 1900
     
      . . . . .
     
The old barge DACOTAH is being used to lighter the cargo of the steamer SWALLOW, lying on the American bank of the St. Clair, below Marine City. The SWALLOW is said to be too far gone to warrent raising.
      Detroit Free Press
      October 10, 1900
     
      . . . . .
     
Wrecker QUINN has parctically finished the scattering of the LEADER by dynamite, and has taken his outfit and the steamer RELIABLE to the SWALLOW. He will attempt to float the latter, which is sunk on the bank below Marine City, and if he succeeds she will be towed down here, wher her lumber cargo will be unloaded and sold. It is said to be worth about $2,000. After she is unloaded her owners will determine whether or not she is worth a rebuild.
      Detroit Free Press
      October 11, 1900
     
     
      . . . . .
     
Capt. John Quinn has received word from the captain of the RELIABLE, engaged in raising the wreck of the steam barge SWALLOW, that the wreck would be floated down to Detroit today. The old boat's hull has been lifted from the bottom of the river off Marine City and pumped out. It the SWALLOW comes to Detroit today, it will have been quick work on the part of her wreckers, for work was begun on her only last Friday. Her cargo of lumber, amounting in value to about $2,000 will be sold here when she arrives.
      Detroit Free Press
      October 15, 1900
     
      . . . . .
     
      Wrecker Quinn will go up today to finish blowing up the LEADER wreck.
      The SWALLOW is here, but her owners have not yet decided whether or not to rebuild her.
      Detroit Free Press
      October 18, 1900
     
     
Steam screw SWALLOW. U. S. No. 115184. Of 256.67 tons gross; 203.42 tons net. Built Trenton, Mich., 1873. Home port, Port Huron, Mich. 133.8 x 25.8 x 10.8 Of 175 Nominal horse-power
      Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1891
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: sunk by collision
Lives: nil
Remarks: Raised
Date of Original:
1900
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.22635
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Michigan, United States
    Latitude: 42.68476 Longitude: -82.50963
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Swallow (Propeller), U115184, sunk by collision, 5 Oct 1900