The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
China (Schooner), aground, 5 Nov 1879


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SCHOONER WRECKED
      The Vessel Driven Ashore at Lion's Heed - The Crew Barely Escape With Their Lives
      The gale and snow storm on Sunday night last was the most violent that has been experienced on Georgian Bay for a number of years past. Disasters of various kinds are reported from different quarters, and it will be a time long to be remembered by those who were obliged to encounter the fury of the storm. Probably the most
disastrous casualty was that of the schooner CHINA, of Hamilton, E. McGowan vaster. This fine vessel is full canal size, 319 tons register, and was bound from Buffalo to Parry Sound for a cargo of lumber. She was caught in the gale when off Cabots Head, and the vessel was put about, with a view to make the shelter of Toberinory
harbor. Owing to the intensity of the gale, the vessel being light, and a large portion of her canvas carried away, she failed to accomplish her purpose. She then retraced her course and came to anchor off Lion's Head about six o'clock p.m. Although both anchors were down, she was unable to hold against the raging elements, and,
parting her small cable, she commenced dragging her only remaining anchor, and at about 3 a.m. struck the shore in Lion's Head harbor broadside on. The crew, consisting of the captain, first and second mates, six men and one woman, the stewardess, all got ashore safely, but in an exhausted condition, and after one or two rebuffs which Capt. McGowan complains of, were cared for by the residents of Lion's Head. The captain and crew did all in human power to save their vessel, but as it was necessary to save the lives of all on board, they were obliged to let her drift ashore. Capt. McGowan arrived here on Wednesday and immediately telegraphed for assistance, and a wrecking tug will arrive upon the scene of the disaster in a day or two. The schooner is about four feet out of water, but as there are about 11 feet of water close alongside it, it is thought she will be got off without much damage.
      Wiarton Echo
      November 7, 1879
     
      . . . . .
     

      The gale and snowstorm on Sunday night last was the most violent that has been experienced on Georgian Bay for a number of years past. Disasters of various kinds are reported from different quarters,and it will be a time long to be remembered by those who were obliged to encounter the fury of the storm.Probably the most disastrous casuality was that of the schooner CHINA of, milton.E. McGowan, Master. This fine vessel is full canal size, 319 tons register, and was bound from Buffalo to Parry Sound for a cargo of lumber. She was caught in the gale when off Cabot's Head, and the vessel was put about, with a view to make the shelter of Tobermory Harbor.
Owing to the intensity of the gale, the vessel being light, and a large portion of her canvas carried away, she failed to accomplish her purpose. She then retraced her course and came to anchor off Lion's Head, about 6 o'clock P.M. Although both anchors were down, she was unable to hold against the raging elements, and parted her small cable, she commenced dragging her only remaining anchor, and at about 3 o'clock A. M. struck the shore in Lion's Head Harbor broadside on.
      The crew, consisting of the Captain, first and second mates, six men and one women, the stewardess, all got ashore safely, but in an exhausted condition, and after one or two rebuffs, which Captain McGowan complains of, were cared for by the residents of Lion's Head.
      The Captain and crew did all in human power to save their vessel but as it was necessary to save the lives of all on board, they were obliged to let her drift ashore. Captain McGowan arrived here (Wiarton) on Wednesday and immediately telegraphed for assistance and a wrecking tug will arrive upon the scene of the disaster in a day or two. The Schooner is about 4 feet out of water, but as there are about II feet of water close alongside it, it is thought she will be got off without much damage ---- Echo.
      Meaford Monitor
      Friday, November 14, 1879
     
      . . . . .
     
      THE SCHOONER CHINA -- The schooner CHINA, reported ashore here in last week's ECHO, is still in the same position. The tug TECUMSEH from Sarnia, arrived of f the harbor on Thursday, the 6th inst., but owing to the unsheltered position of the bay she did not deem it safe to attempt to get the vessel off. The people at this place have asked aid of the Government to build a breakwater, and had such shelter been in existence the night the schooner came ashore, your correspondent is certain the mishap would not have occurred. A breakwater is much needed at this harbor, and could be built at a trifling cost compared with a great many works of the kind, and would be the means of preventing disasters in the future, as this is a very dangerous point for a vessel to be caught in a gale. The harbor with this improvement is well, adapted to shelter shipping from the storms that rage at this season. The CHINA has been dismantled and the sails, cordage, etc., has been taken to Owen Sound for storage. An effort will be made within a day or two to get her off.
      Wiarton Echo
      November 14, 1879
     
      . . . . .

LION'S HEAD -- The schooner CHINA, ashore here, was got off by the wrecking tug McARTHUR last Friday and towed to Owen Sound. The CHINA is owned by Mr. A. N. Moffatt, of Port Huron, Mich. She will go on the dry dock for repairs. Her rudder is gone, and she is leaking badly. The damage she has sustained is not considered extensive.
      Wiarton Echo
      Friday, November 21, 1879
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: aground
Lives: nil
Remarks: Got off
Date of Original:
1879
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.22792
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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China (Schooner), aground, 5 Nov 1879