The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Detroit Free Press (Detroit, MI), 1 Jul, 1906


Description
Full Text
FOR FLOATING POOLROOM
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REAL USE FOR STEAMER STIRLING AT CHICAGO
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Will Give Opposition to the City of Traverse
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Chicago, June 30. - It was announced today that the steamer John R. Stirling, purchased last Monday at Detroit by Capt. George Tebo to operate in the passenger business in Chicago, was really the property of Mont. Tennes and his backers, and was to be used as a floating pool room in opposition to the City of Traverse. The steamer is now having the necessary alterations made at Algonac on the St. Clair River. The work is being rushed, and it is expected to have the Stirling ready to start for Chicago by Monday night, arriving here Thursday. A landing place for the boat has already been secured in the river east of Rush street bridge. The craft will be sailed by Capt. George Tebo, lately in the vessel fueling business on the Chicago river.

It is said that the Tennes crowd paid $20,000 to the Great Lakes Engineering Works for the boat, and that it will represent an outlay of at least $30,000 by the time it is ready for service.

The Stirling was formerly the freight steamer Vanderbilt, which for many years traded between Chicago and Buffalo in the package freight business. A cabin will be added on the upper deck, and with the other changes to be provided the boat can accommodate 1,500 people.


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Original:
1 Jul, 1906
Local identifier:
GLN.5680
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
Dave Swayze
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
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Detroit Free Press (Detroit, MI), 1 Jul, 1906