The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Sea Gull (yacht), storm / ashore, 1 Nov 1926


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OLD THORNBURY SAILOR LOST IN A GALE ON THE BAY
      Frank Henman's Boat Was Washed Up on Christian Island Recently
      NO TRACE OF BODY
      Left Parry Sound on November 20th in Sail Boat for Thornbury
      (Canadian Press Cable)
PARRY SOUND, Dec. 6: Efforts are being made to ascertain the fate of Frank Henman of Thornbury, who left here on November 20th, in his sail boat on his return trip after having delivered a cargo of fruit and vegetables in Parry Sound. He was last seen on November 22nd, about 12 miles from Copper Head, and as the weather has been very severe, the worst is feared.


      Found Boat But No Body
      (Special to The Sun Times)
THORNBURY. Dec. 6 All indications point to Hemnan as having been drowned as infonnation has been received at Thomburyto the effect that the Chief at Christian Island wrote to the Chief at Penetang that Henman's boat was found on the shore, broken in two and with the sails set, some time ago but with no trace of the owner. It is presumed that he was washed overboard and drowned. He was an elderly man well on toward 80 years of age, and could not stand a great deal of rough weather. He has a brother residing in Collingwood and a sister living in California but these are his only relatives in this country. He was thought of and his disappearance has occasioned genuine regret among his friends in Thornbury.
. Daily Sun-Times. Owen Sound
      December 6,1926
.
..

      Capt. Frank Henman. An Intrepid Navigator
      Left Parry Sound for Thornbury, But Has Not Been Heard of Since
      His Wrecked Boat Was Found on Shores of Christian Island
      (Special to The Sun-Times)
THORNBURY Dec 8:- Capt Frank Henman of Thornbury who is believed to have been drowned from his small sailing craft the Sea Gull which was found beached on the shores of Christian Island, was one of the best known old time sailors in the Georgian Bay. According to his friends he never knew what danger on the open water meant and took more chances than most men. It is no doubt that it was this recklessness or disregard of danger that finally cost him
his life. When his small craft was found on the Christian Island shore almost broken in two the sails were up but one of the masts was broken off a few feet from the top and it is surmised that he was washed into the bay while endeavouring to adjust the sail on the mast. It was on Saturday November 20th that Capt Henman left Parry Sound and he has not been seen or heard of since.
      When his friends in Thornbury realized that their popular citizen had probably found a grave in Davy Jones locker it was suggested that a search party be organized to explore the shores of Christian Island in an effort to find the body but the recent cold spell has caused a heavy fringe of ice to form outside the Thornbury harbor and it is understood the suggestion has been dropped. There are those in Thornbury who in view of the many Miraculous escapes he has
made in the past are loth to believe that he has been drowned but think he will yet turn up although the majority of the people have given up all hopes.
Capt Henman was a good citizen of the town of Thornbury. He was not a married man but enjoyed the respect and confidence of the people generally and will be much missed. He was for a number of years superintendent of the Sunday School of the former Methodist church. He was seventy.seven years of age and came to Canada from England when only 10 years old. For the past twenty.seven years he has made his home with David White, of Thornbury. He has onebrother, David Henman who lives near Collingwood and a sister living in California. The former
stated when in Thornbury a few days ago that he would search the east shore of the Georgian Bay and Christian Island shores when the storm was over to try and find the body of his brother.
      Capt Henman had been trading in fruit along the north shore for over forty years. During the last few years he always sailed alone and was known by many sailors who sailed the east and north shore of the Georgian Bay as the most daring captain that ever sailed in this part. He had many shipwrecks at one time his craft being burned to the water's edge and he had to swim to shore. Another time his boat had turned over in a storm while sailing and through his presence of mind he grabbed a piece of rope from the sail, being himself on the bottom straddling and using his feet for paddles until he reached shore. These are only a couple of the many miraculous escapes he has had.
      Daily Sun-Times Owen Sound
      December 8, 1926
      [courtesy Bill Hester]
     


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Notes:
Reason: storm / ashore
Lives: 1
Remarks: Total loss ?
Date of Original:
1926
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
McN.W.25154
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
William R. McNeil
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Sea Gull (yacht), storm / ashore, 1 Nov 1926