The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Iron Ore being taken from an Open-Pit Mine, Hibbing, Minn.


Description
Media Type:
Image
Item Type:
Stereographs
Description:
Stereoview of steam shovel working in an open pit mine where it is loading iron ore onto rail ore cars for carriage to the ore loaders at the rail head.
Inscriptions:
163
"6965 Iron Ore Being Taken from an Open Pit Mine, Hibbing, Minn."
Keystone View Company
Copyrighted
Manufacturers Publishers
Made in U.S.A.
Meadville, Pa., New York, N. Y., Chicago, Ill., London, England

Reverse:
163-(6965)
Iron Ore being taken from an Open-Pit Mine, Hibbing, Minn.

This steam shovel is scooping up iron ore in an open-pit mine in the Mesaba Range in Minnesota. This is the most valuable iron region known in the world. Most iron is hard rock and must be blasted. It must also be mined underground. But in this unusual mountain range the iron ore is so near the surface and so soft that it can be mined with steam shovels such as you ssee in this picture. This shovel is cutting a trench several yards wide. It is loading the ore it removes into those cars near by. This shovel can load one of those cars in about three minutes. Each year the Mesaba Range mines furnish one-third of the world's supply of iron. The Mesaba, The Vermilion, and Cuyuna Ranges, all in northern Minnesota, enable the United States to lead the world in iron and steel industries.

At one time all the iron ore from this district was shipped to the eastern coal fields. This was economical because it takes two tons of coal to smelt every ton of ore. However, instead of allowing the ore boats to return empty they were finally used to bring back coal so that some of the smelting could be done in the iron district. Today important steel and iron works are located in both the iron and the coal districts.

Iron and steel, which is a form of iron, are so necessary to us today that if all iron suddenly disappeared we would have to live almost as savages do. Our tools, machinery, screws, nails, ships, engines, automobiles, car tracks, frame work for large buildings, stoves, and many other things are made wholly or partly of this important and valuable metal.

Copyright by the Keystone View Company.
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Place of Publication:
Meadville, PA
Date of Original:
circa 1905
Dimensions:
Width: 17.7 cm
Height: 8.7 cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
784
Language of Item:
English
  • Minnesota, United States
    Latitude: 47.42715 Longitude: -92.93769
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
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Iron Ore being taken from an Open-Pit Mine, Hibbing, Minn.
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Iron Ore being taken from an Open-Pit Mine, Hibbing, Minn.


Stereoview of steam shovel working in an open pit mine where it is loading iron ore onto rail ore cars for carriage to the ore loaders at the rail head.