The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Rochester Express (Rochester, NY), Monday, Oct. 2, 1876


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Full Text
Capt. Dan. H. Bromley, of Rochester
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Capt. Bromley was born in New Haven, Oswego county, in the year 1810, and he was, therefore, in the sixty-sixth year of his age at the time of his death. Owing to his reticence regarding himself, very few particulars of his eventful life can be obtained. he was a brother of Pliny M. Bromley, whose death two years ago, is well remembered by the people of Rochester. he was also a brother of Hiram and Drayton Bromley.

Capt. Dan., as the deceased was perhaps best known to hundreds of people in this vicinity, first started out in life in the forwarding establishment of his oldest brother, Hiram Bromley, in Albany. at the age of sixteen years he assumed charge of a line of the defunct packets on the Erie Canal. For this position he seemed to be well adapted, and as, at that time, the packets were the favorite means of travel, he at once sprang into a wonderful popularity all long the entire route, winning friends innumerable by his geniality, sterling integrity and politeness.

Finally he became master of three packet boats, and did an immense business. When the railroads in this section were completed, of course the packet business began to wane, and Captain Bromley then took charge of a train on the Niagara Falls road as conductor. Here again his courtesy won hosts of friends for him. he remained in that position for may years.

In 1864 he went to Niagara Falls and assumed a proprietary interest in the Clifton House. In 1867 he came to this city and became a partner with his brother, P.M. Bromley, in the proprietorship of the Osburn House. His sociability, industrious habits and constant care for the comfort of his guests made him, we may truthfully say, one of the most popular landlords in he state. With all hd was a great favorite, and his fondness for young people and his excellent spirits, made him one of the best known and best liked men in Rochester.

He was, to sum up his virtues in a single sentence - every inch a gentleman. It is some three months since Captain Bromley was attacked with the first symptoms of the disease which ended in his death. It was not until a week ago, however, that signs of imminent danger became apparent. In his death the city lost a good man and a useful citizen.


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Original:
Monday, Oct. 2, 1876
Local identifier:
GLN.14027
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
Richard Palmer
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
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Rochester Express (Rochester, NY), Monday, Oct. 2, 1876